Type 26 Frigate CBL Cable contractors win increases worth up to 22.8%.

Unite the trade union confirmed today that strike action involving over 30 members contracted to work on the new Type 26 Frigates on the Clyde has been called off after a significant pay victory.

The Unite members employed by CBL Cable Contractors Limited based at the BAE Systems Govan and Scotstoun shipyards on the Clyde secured a pay rise of £3.05 per hour. This means the lowest paid workers are set to receive a wage increase worth up to 22.8 per cent. By July, all workers will be paid the ‘shipyard rate’ depending on their role.

Unite general secretary Sharon Graham said:

“The CBL Cable workers have secured a significant victory. Let’s remember that it was only because our members were prepared to take strike action the company came back to the table with an improved offer. We are pleased the new year has begun for the CBL workforce with a pay deal secured by Unite which delivers better jobs, pay and conditions.”

The CBL contractors including electricians, labourers and cable hands were scheduled to take strike action through the months of January, February and March. The dispute centred on Unite demanding the workers be paid the BAE Systems shipyard rate, or an additional £1 per hour on top of the current rates of pay. The dispute also involved travel related payments which Unite’s members are due.

The Clyde shipyards fall under the scope of the Joint Industry Board Agreement which sets the standards for employment, grading, and apprentice training in the electrical contracting industry. The agreement includes travel time and the use of a personal vehicle to travel to work which entitles workers to a mileage allowance.

Stevie Dillon, Unite regional coordinator, added:

“The pay deal ensures that our CBL Cable members based in the Govan and Scotstoun yards are now on an equal footing with other BAE workers. Through the determination of our members to fight for what they were rightfully owed; the company has finally seen sense before any strike action took place. The deal was overwhelmingly backed by the membership and it’s a great way to start the new year.”

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
2 months ago

At least the matter is settled.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
2 months ago

We hope, there are more.reasons for this kind of thing. The nation needs these ships now, not eventually.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
2 months ago

Industrial action at a time like this is not very bright what is given can be taken away the navy could reconsider its orders anytime and the yards and it’s people could be in real trouble. Now and in the near future

Angus
Angus
2 months ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

And exactly where would they be built if not there? We have lost so much capacity the options are no longer there. And those building the ships should get a fair wage for a fair days work, many get far more for doing far less….

Frank62
Frank62
2 months ago
Reply to  Angus

Indeed. We have one frigate build shed coming there & another building T31s at Rosyth. Nowhere else has this capacity & the contracts are signed & funded. We need these ships yesterday.
We need to stop the endless war on workers across industry, trying to screw as much as possible out of the workforce for the least wages & benefits, hoarding all the profits at the top.

andy reeves
andy reeves
2 months ago
Reply to  Angus

too much money was thrown at the clyde. there could have been at least one yard in the north east saved with that money

Paul
Paul
2 months ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

Well collective bargaining worked, the ordinary worker won a compromise from those in charge and is better off for it. So it was an extremely brilliant time to threaten industrial action. Score one to the hard working men and women who actually build the ships