The two-week NATO exercise Dynamic Mariner 21/Joint Warrior 21-2 was concluded on Wednesday off the coast of Scotland.

Dynamic Mariner 21/Joint Warrior 21-2 (DYMR21/JW212) is a Maritime Force Integration live exercise and was part of the certification process for the NATO Response Force Maritime Component (NRF/M) for 2022.

“Created in 2002, the NATO Response Force is a highly ready and technologically advanced, multinational force made up of land, air, maritime and Special Operations Forces components which provides collective defense and rapidly deployable units. NATO say that it provides a quick response to an emerging crisis as well as peace-support operations, critical infrastructure protection and disaster relief.”

The exercise took place in the waters off Northwest Scotland, known as the Minch, and UK land and airspace.

It brought together 21 surface ships, 1 submarine, 7 maritime patrol aircraft and other air assets as well as personnel, from 12 nations, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Latvia, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States.

DYMR21 was led by the NATO Maritime Command in coordination with Joint Tactical Exercise Planning Staff of Royal Navy.

“The exercise also involves Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) and Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group One (SNMCMG1), two of NATO’s Standing Forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence on a permanent basis. NATO’s maritime strength lies in the ability of the Standing Forces and National Response Force elements to rapidly join with high readiness, high capability national forces and task groups. Regular training between these groups is a force multiplier and provides a collectively trained and interoperable capability that NATO can confidently deploy if necessary.”

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“Dynamic Mariner was another opportunity to work with allied navies, learn and understand each unit’s capabilities and maximize interoperability within the task group,” said Commodore Bradley Peats, Commander of SNMG1.

“To keep our nations safe in an unpredictable world, we need to be constantly exercising and training with realistic scenarios. We do this by working together to ensure we remain ready to respond to any current or future threat.”

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Ian M
Ian M
6 days ago

The second image shows clearly how warship design has moved on.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
6 days ago
Reply to  Ian M

Agreed.

Not just looks and RCS but how integrated and precise the whole thing is.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 days ago

Next on the agenda for POW?

“Thales UK and Schiebel have undertaken first UK flight trials of a new shipborne multisensor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) developed to meet emerging requirements for persistent over-the-horizon surveillance.”

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/air-platforms/latest/thales-scheibel-complete-s-100-uas-flight-trials

TypewriterMonkey
TypewriterMonkey
6 days ago

Slightly off topic, sorry, but anyone know what happened to the F35B ‘rolling landing’ technique that was tested on the QE? It looked interesting but seems like we’re sticking with the ‘classic’ Harrier style… move to the side over the ship and then land. Has the ‘rolling landing’ been dumped to fit in with the US Marines?

Last edited 6 days ago by TypewriterMonkey
Ian M
Ian M
6 days ago

I thought the “rolling” landing was used if the aircraft is heavy ie. still carrying ordnance or a lot of fuel.

DP
DP
6 days ago
Reply to  Ian M

Yes, I believe so (not an expert) but isn’t there a cost saving in terms of fuel used with rolling landing also? Appreciate in the grand scheme of things this might be small fry but over the course of the life of QE and PoW, it would add up, would it not?

Ian M
Ian M
6 days ago
Reply to  DP

Not so much the cost of fuel but unexpended ordnance which is often jettisoned in the ‘oggin prior to landing back on board. I’m sure some Naval gunnery types on here will elucidate.

Last edited 6 days ago by Ian M
Mike
Mike
6 days ago

The decks of the Royal Navy carrier always look so empty, don’t they? The MCM ships are now in their twilight years.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 days ago
Reply to  Mike

Whoa, you’re a bit late to the party with that old chestnut Harold. Things have moved on since.

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago
Reply to  Mike

Hold your horses troll TH, Harold, PierreLM etc….Yout trolling is a little outdated, you need to up your game and make more of an effort….currently you are sitting at 1 out of 10 on the sad trollometer!

Klonkie
Klonkie
6 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

On a personal note, I enjoy the responses from those who are in the know. Brightens up the gloomy COVID lockdown we are currently in. Besides, I learn things from the educated replies which I value.

Still, your point is well made on the repetitive nature of the trolling.

Airborne
Airborne
5 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Agreed klonk but Mike isn’t one of those educated replies.

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

hah ha you have me there Sir! Do appreciate their posts waste other people’s time.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 days ago
Reply to  Mike

That efforts so tame I’m actually in agreement.

Yes, MCMV are gradually on their way out. Replaced with new tech.

The deck of the carrier is empty, for now.
Having just achieved operational clearance why should it be any different.

Klonkie
Klonkie
6 days ago

Greetings D, re the looming MCMV looing gap. do you know which current assets will act as the motherships for the planned unmanned MCMV systems?

My concern is the task gets added to the list of the upcoming type 31/2 frigates. I believe 3-4 Rivers are normally in home waters on fishery protection duties. So I wonder if there is an opportunity tp place a modulized MCMV system on the aft deck? Useful in times of a crisis.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Evening K.

I don’t, as far as I’m aware there has been no news on motherships at all. Maybe some of the Hunts initially??? They are going last.

3 Batch 1 Rivers remain in home waters, the batch2’s are off and away.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
6 days ago

It won’t be any of the current Sandown or Hunts acting as mother’s ships.
The work boats and containerised systems are simply to heavy and deploying an 11m workboat on and off of a Hunt would cause massive and dangerous stability issues.

It’s been looked at and dismissed as not a viable option.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Thanks for that GB.

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago

Cheers D

Frank62
Frank62
6 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Might be wrong but I thought mothershiping MCM drone was to be part of the spec for the T32?

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
6 days ago
Reply to  Mike

Twilight years?
With the RN maybe .
However there are plenty of suitors looking to buy the Sandowns and Hunts. Those hulls have at least another 30 years left in them if not more, that’s the great thing about GRP its pretty much indestructible in regular ship use as a hull material. You just need to keep updating whats inside and they could go on for probably 100 years.

DP
DP
6 days ago

Completely off topic but watched the new 007 movie last night. It was a cracker. I really liked Sean Connery as Bond but think Daniel Craig has, in my view, made Bond his own. Shame he’s retiring. It made me chuckle though, watching a T45 launch some ballistic missiles from its forward silos …. with multiple warheads, as a land attack system! Was this another FFNW option that was actually taken up? 😆

Klonkie
Klonkie
6 days ago
Reply to  DP

You lucky sod! We are in lock down so no movie going until the end of October. Pleased you enjoyed it. My money is on either Tom Hardy or Idris Elba as the new Bond

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
6 days ago
Reply to  DP

Watched it last week and enjoyed it.
The Buffer needs to sort out the part of ship though.
The RCP2 bracket on the bridge screen needed a lick of paint and who left the port side door ajar during a firing… Probably the weapons Tiff with a go pro getting some good shots for his Instagram page
😂