HMS Shoreham has returned to Scotland.

The Royal Navy say that the Sandown Class Mine Counter Measures Vessel left Scottish shores in 2018, making the 6,000-mile journey to the Gulf, where she was part of the UK’s enduring presence in the region along with fellow Royal Navy minehunter HMS Brocklesby.

“While deployed, Shoreham helped keep important sea-lanes secure, ready to detect and neutralise underwater devices should anyone threaten the safe passage of merchant shipping.

While the ships stay in the region, the crews rotate, with the current ship’s company – Crew Five from MCM1 – having spent eleven-months deployed on operations in the last 15-months.  The Crew also had the task of sailing the 600-tonne ship home.”

The journey back home saw the crew conduct maritime security operations in over seven different seas and four vital maritime “choke points”, deterring both piracy and terrorism.  Both HMS Shoreham and HMS Brocklesby also participated in Operation Sea Guardian, NATO’s maritime security mission in the Mediterranean.

“I am incredibly proud of my ship’s company for the hard work and effort they have put into making this trip home a success,” said Lieutenant Commander Richard Kemp, Commanding Officer of HMS Shoreham.

“They have shown a fantastic ethos, especially during some challenging periods at sea.  I now look forward to granting my ship’s company some well-deserved post-deployment leave before we continue operations in the UK.”

You can read more here.

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JK
JK
1 day ago

What happens to her now?

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 day ago
Reply to  JK

Gifted to Ukraine?

David Barry
David Barry
1 day ago

Welcome home!

Ron
Ron
1 day ago

As these two classes of MCM vessels are being taking out of service I wonder if a few of them could be used by a University or a new Ocean research group for research and polution controls in coastal seas. They might be even useful in controling infrastucture such as undersea cables/pipelines etc. Only an idea.

As for HMS Shoreham and Brocklesby, good job and welcome home. Of to new pastures soon.

Steve M
Steve M
1 day ago
Reply to  Ron

replace gun with High pressure waer cannon and transfer to Fisheries, they can patrol Channel islands

George Parker
George Parker
5 hours ago
Reply to  Steve M

You beat me to it Steve. They would be perfect for the job. I’d leave the gun and add the water cannon. They could also be used to sink inflatables used by illegal economic migrants.

Tommo
Tommo
37 minutes ago
Reply to  George Parker

George you’ve got my Vote for the latter of your 2nd suggestion Out Sweeps that should catch some Props, better still if Swedish Mk 9 cutters were also fitted

Mike
Mike
1 day ago

This is my argument. These ships have been used for a multitude of tasks. How can remote controlled mine hunters fulfil that same range of roles? And what will be used when they are scrapped or passed on to maintain the ‘enduring presence’ in the region in question? The navy gets smaller and it’s all well and good having a few larger ships but these small vessels do so much.

Challenger
Challenger
1 day ago
Reply to  Mike

The Type 32 has been touted as a means to increase the escort fleet to 24 but if they are the sole replacements for the mine-hunter fleet then it’s yet another net cut in numbers! With the batch 1 River’s and Echo’s getting long in the tooth by 2030 i’ve long thought we should at that point bring the batch 2 River’s back to the UK and replace both the former vessels and the Hunt’s/Sandown’s with 8-12 2-3,000 ton hulls that have a basic patrol/presence fit and the space/configuration to deploy containerized mine-warfare or survey equipment. Type 31/32’s (with a… Read more »

eclipse
eclipse
23 hours ago
Reply to  Challenger

We just can’t afford that. Per tonne, I believe minehunters are the navy’s most expensive vessels. I’m happy with the T32s if they get done properly, and internationally our allies will value a frigate with a bunch of autonomous MCMVs more than 4 or 5 manned MCMVs. If we see another budget increase, which is possible in the worlds current climate, I would begin with arming the ships we have better, then increasing sub numbers, whether through AIP or more nuclear, probably the former.

Tommo
Tommo
22 hours ago
Reply to  eclipse

Eclipse, Hms Wilton was the Navy’s first foray into GRP constructed MW ship or as it was Hms see through, very affective for a low Magnetic signature, Expensive but a point had been proven When the First Hunt class Hms Brecon was Commissioned she was at the time the largest GRP boat built so construction was lengthy, it had to be strong but light in structure first with bow thrusters everything had too be made to keep the Ships Mag signature as low as possible costly their were but Damn good at what they were built for .The use of… Read more »

Ron
Ron
22 hours ago
Reply to  eclipse

Eclipse, in many ways we can afford 8-12 2-3,000 ton mother ships, it just depends on how we do it. At the moment the government is looking at the possibility of a T32, at the same time looking at a MRSS and a LSS plus a mother ship for unmanned MCM, ROVs etc. So lets look at what other nations are doing, I did mention Belgium Holland in my first post. They are building with the French a 2,400-2,800 ton mothership at the cost of about £100 million each. They have bays for unmanned surface vessels, ROVs, automated underwater detection… Read more »

George Parker
George Parker
5 hours ago
Reply to  eclipse

Can we dispense with the throwaway comment. “We cannot afford that.” The first duty of government is national defence and that includes our global interests. Post BREXIT Great Britain, simply cannot afford to have a numerically inadequate Royal Navy. We could easily justify doubling the fleet in every area other than carriers. We give away enough money to achieve that target and greatly expand the other services too.

Ron Stateside
Ron Stateside
23 hours ago

Just noting that in the replies above, nobody is taking into account what the capabilities of the unmanned MCMVs are. I’m all for increased hull numbers too, but if a small boat can do route survey then so be it. This represents a massive cost savings. Personally I would like to see a mix of smaller (ship based) and larger (shore based) unmanned vehicles along with about 7 Venari minehunter motherships for where presence and quick reaction are needed.

Tommo
Tommo
18 hours ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

Ron I take it that for Route surveys such as OP Pike a small boat could do this task would this be manned or Remote unmanned was just wondering if orderance was too be found which happens especially after storms have passed through R.S quadrants would it be dealt with straight away or marked and left ?

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
8 hours ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

People are fixated on numbers, rather than capability. And what affect these platforms bring to the fight.

Andrew
Andrew
3 hours ago

Not being in the navy, could someone please explain to me how the tour of duty works for the crews? The article states that the crew have been deployed for 11 of the last 15 months… what does that actually mean in real life? how long would a crew be expected to be based in the gulf/deployed before being allowed to fly back to the Uk to be with family for a break/downtime…. Long deployments was the reason I never joined the navy, I just didn’t think the work/life balance was right.

Tommo
Tommo
10 seconds ago
Reply to  Andrew

Andrew ,I’m Ex Navy ,when I Joined up did my training and After 6mnts Got my first Sea draft, which was from between 24mnths to 30mntgs, deployments were around 4 too 6 months there was no crew changes if your time was up ,you’d be Drafted off 1 for 1 didn’t getting half deployments and full crew changes or R&R not until the Mid 80ts did we shut ship and take 2 weeks leave when deployed if we were in a squadron of 3 boats Now days Sweepers rotate their crews on a regular basis Crew for Crew