Offshore patrol ship HMS Spey joined navies, coast guards and police in the southwest Pacific on a concerted effort to protect local fishing stocks, say the Royal Navy.

“Over ten days Spey took part in Operation Island Chief, one of four concerted efforts every year focusing on detecting, reporting, apprehending and deterring illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing. Illegal fishing is estimated to cost the Pacific Island nations more than US $150m (£127m) every year in lost revenue.

Seventeen nations have joined forces to monitor activities across a vast area of the Pacific – more than 18.4 million square kilometers of ocean, 30 times larger than the North Sea and rich with tuna – covering waters in the economic exclusion zones of Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu amongst others.

It’s the first time the Royal Navy has taken part in the operation, one of many varied missions as part of the broader five-year Pacific mission by sister patrol ships HMS Spey and Tamar.”

You can read more on this here.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Sean
Sean
1 year ago

Any more on the story that HMS Spey was denied port access by the Solomon Islands government? It’s been confirmed that they ignored the requests of the US Coast Guard cutter that was also taking part in the operation.

Mike
Mike
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

Wouldn’t be a surprise, trying to look good to Chinese masters.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

Solomon Islands, a former British colony then protectorate, is reigned over by our Queenwho has a Governor General in-country. How does that make them ‘servants’ to the Chinese?
The British connection makes it very hard to understand why the islands would deny access to a RN vessel.

Mike
Mike
1 year ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

If you have a look online, you will see how Soloman Islands are transitioning towards China. They have recently changed recognition from Taiwan to Beijing, signed security pacts with China, have given money to the Soloman Islands PM – whom has then allocated this to individual MP’s, lots of Chinese infrastructure investments which will likely later fall under chinese control when debt repayments fail, etc etc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfXX0QaNLWw

Talk of banning foreign journalists whom are disrespectful. List goes on.

Last edited 1 year ago by Mike
grizzler
grizzler
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

I’d like to say we should leave ’em to it, but strategically thats bad idea. As others on here have advocated until the West reappropriates its manufacturing away from China this will only go one way.
It seems we need to pay through the nose for energy following Russia’s recent shenanigans (not sure why we the people need to do it btw!) .
We need to address the Chinese influence now before it goes the same way- if its not too late.

Caspian237
Caspian237
1 year ago
Reply to  grizzler

I hope the West has now learned its lessons. Don’t try to bring authoritarian nations into the fold, anticipating that this will gradually move them in a direction that we would like. The opposite has happened. Now they are using the wealth we have shared to challenge us and pull more countries into their orbit.

Jonno
Jonno
1 year ago
Reply to  Caspian237

Well said its the wide eyed idealists who let this happen.

Frank62
Frank62
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonno

Rather it is the money grabbing fat cats who thought they could throw western workers on the scrap heap for poverty paid/slave labour in China.

Jonno
Jonno
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank62

That too, both dont you think?

Matt
Matt
1 year ago
Reply to  grizzler

We the people will do it in the end anyway, as it is govt initiatives which will be required.

Some billions of costs are already being recovered from energy production companies through higher existing tax rates and a further windfall tax.

Energy distribution companies are not very profitable, so not much scope there. eg Octopus has never made a profit.

In France the French taxpayer will end up picking up the €20bn or so potential bill already faced by the Govt for their destruction then nationalisation of EDF. All to keep the voters sweet in advance of an election.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt
Paul.P
Paul.P
1 year ago
Reply to  grizzler

Not much we can do about it if they are independent. One of the benefits of the French revolution. Many of not most of the French Pacific islands are French departments I think….sort of counties. Sovereign French territory.

Frank62
Frank62
1 year ago
Reply to  grizzler

Chinese base in the Solomons is a knife at the throat of the ANZACs.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 year ago
Reply to  grizzler

It is the problem with allowing vacuums to develop when you draw down the size of RN and general investment support. In the Blur/Brown years it was ‘very expensive’ and ‘lots of corruption’ and in the Camoron years it was left to DIFID to waste the money away without buying anything much with lots of waffle about soft lower. The reality is everyone else’s aid spending is laser focussed on buying influence. Likewise with net zero: everyone else is delighted we are crippling our industry with high fuel costs: they are not. They are delighted to step in a do… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

ChiComs are perfecting this zero-sum game. Anticipate replication in many small, defenseless but potentially strategic nations. Believe Chinese had some role in the development of the game of chess.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Apology due, Wiki states chess, a game of strategy, popularized in China during ChiCom era. Coincidence? Think probably not

Darren hall
Darren hall
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

They may not have invented Chess, but this is straight out of Master Tzu’s play book….

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

Thanks Mike. Very good info. There is still confusion as to whether Solomon Islands did or did not give clearance for HMS Spey to dock.

Mark B
Mark B
1 year ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

The Solomon Islands are independent and have been since the 1970s. There are quite a few independent countries who maintain the Queen as head of state. If the people wish to place themselves in the pocket of China then that is their decision. A bad decision by the Solomon Islanders if you ask me but that is life.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark B

Agree with the basic principal. However, definition of ‘the Solomon Islanders’ and ‘their wishes’ may need restricting to a precious few? Now, the UK does seem to be doing its bit with regard to our Overseas Territories 4 million sq km Blue Belt initiative, as well as coordinating other countries into territorial waters protection. But I do worry over just how well we can monitor this since many are so remote. Satellites are the most practical wide area option, no doubt. But how long will some operators with known form (let’s refer to them as Xi to preserve anonimity, for… Read more »

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark B

It is not universally popular in ‘The Solomons’ either. If Australia decides to move, then Solomons will collapse, though they need to move soon, before China can get itself established. The Solomons Prime Minister is a fool that thinks he is in control of the China relationship while splashing around Chinese money (to keep himself in power). Australia & New Zealand along with other Pacific countries have recently been militarily & paramilitary involved in stabilising the country. It is possible the same coalition will move against the Solomons. They just need to stop being diplomatic & start getting real. Either… Read more »

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  D J

Australia (and others) move against the Solomons? Never, not going to happen.

What fantasy land do you live in?

The Australian Government will only enter the Solomons (or other Pacific neighbours), if requested to by an elected Government of that country.

We are not in the business of invading neighbours, no matter how screwed their internal politics is.

Not going to happen.

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

John

The last intervention happened because the government & the nation basically collapsed. From what I see, they are seriously heading in the same direction. The current Prime Minister is opposed (en block) by several of the primary (island based) provinces. I disagree, Australia will act in the same way US did in the Caribbean. You are assuming there will be a functioning government. They will though, want other Pacific nations to agree.

China changes everything. Do you want the Chinese military to sort the problem for you?

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  D J

Mate, I’ll repeat what I said last night.

Australia will only enter the Solomons if invited, simple as that.

Two methods of entry, by the elected Government, or by the Governor-General (as was the case with RAMSI).

If we, and other Pacific nations, just march in, it would piss off more of our Pacific neighbours than it would please (diplomacy is an odd animal).

No matter how screwed up a Solomons Government in charge is, we won’t march in without an invite.

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

John Appreciate your view. Being invited in by the Governor General means the civilian government is non functioning. Governor Generals are appointed, not elected. They do not represent the people, they represent the Queen & their countries constitution. If no invite is forthcoming, do you simply allow the Chinese military to “support” the current unpopular government? The security pact they signed with China (what we know of it), seems to suggest this is possible. Once they arrive, what’s the plan? A USCG ship was refused entry. That is less of a problem then refusing one of HM ships (from anywhere),… Read more »

Mark B
Mark B
1 year ago
Reply to  D J

China have been trying to inflitrate themselves into economies worldwide for a while in an effort to gain influence. It is only a matter of time before a country defaults on their loans and we will see what happens next. Very destabilising but perhaps that is the objective. Economic warfare which might just lead to some form of conventional warfare if the world is not careful.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
1 year ago
Reply to  D J

The Solomons are not a stable confederation. The history is one of conflict. Leading ‘political’ figures are effectively bought by the Chinese. China’s most recent triumph in creating an exclusive enclave in the Solomons is a very clear threat. Like all previous dictatorships, the trick is to wait for weak western leaders to come along.

Jonno
Jonno
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark B

They will go the same way as the American Indians, as sure as night follows day, except they should have known better.

Julian
Julian
1 year ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Solomon Islands has recently signed an agreement with China where if there is a need China can assist the government even with the provision of Chinese troops should the Solomon Islands need it . Very friendly towards China

David Flandry
David Flandry
1 year ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

They may still have a legal connection to the UK, but are in act under PRC influence now.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Especially as these vessels are actually acting to help them in anti illegal fishing activities. However the main party guilty of such activities by scale at least is China. So I guess there might be a case of unwanted influence here perhaps in return their over fishing activities occur away from the Solomons. Pure speculation but would not be contradictory to the ‘soft’ pressure (or blackmail) they are using generally in the Pacific through their fishing fleets as an extension of their military power to apply Power, Threat and Influence over smaller nations. Phillip ins is getting it big time… Read more »

Sean
Sean
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

The RN have declined to comment, unlike the US Coast Guard…

DRS
DRS
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

Well that tells you most likely it is true. If it wasn’t they would have commented. Even if they are not trying to escalate the situation and they were given permission it is bad the Solomon government whose waters these exercises are supposed to protect acted this way to the us coastguards.

DRS
DRS
1 year ago
Reply to  DRS

The interesting thing is those people they are trying to protect from are most likely Chinese fishing fleets

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  DRS

Exactly read my contribution above the Chinese basically make an offer they can’t refuse, pure mafia tactics using their fishing fleet as a tool in those threats to countries that rely on fishing industry.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

Well that’s them of the Christmas card list

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

😂😂

Coll
Coll
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

I just read that it was denied  a scheduled port call for refuelling

dan
dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

They bow down to their Chicom masters now.

Jon
Jon
1 year ago

I wonder if anyone patrols the Pitcairn Island Marine Reserve, or if it’s so isolated they don’t figure they need to bother.

DRS
DRS
1 year ago
Reply to  Jon

They need to bother. We have had one visit from one of these rivers. Hopefully they monitor through satellites but that doesn’t stop it

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  DRS

New Zealand does patrol out around Pitcairn. The problem is they have only 2 frigates & 2 OPV & like all Pacific nations, the area they are trying to cover is massive. Their P3 MPA’s are getting replaced by more advanced P8. Even so, it’s next to impossible to do anything about located illegal fishing boats/ships unless you can intercept via surface vessels (unless you are happy to simply sink them via MPA). French light frigates are actually closer & there is a trilateral deal between France, Australia & NZ re patrol cooperation. Their is only two French light frigates… Read more »

Matt
Matt
1 year ago
Reply to  D J

I thought Indonesia had been sinking Chinese illegal trawlers?

Before long Ireland will be facing the same issue.

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt

Matt Not that I am aware of. Happy to be corrected. Escort a few out of Indonesian waters, certainly. Generally, except around the Natuna Islands in the SCS, there is no value in fishing in Indonesian waters (8,000k+ islands & 300,000,000 people). You need to go further abroad as a commercial proposition. Australia though, regularly sinks Indonesian fishing boats (after taking crew off), that transgress the rules. Australia actually has special rules for Indonesian & Timorese fishing boats that are fishing in traditional fashion in Australian waters close to Indonesia. Start shark fin fishing, chasing after sea cucumber or giant… Read more »

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
1 year ago

It’s good that these vessels have a very long range and there’re plenty of other friendly nations still in the area for fuelling up including us here in 🇦🇺. Silly bugger(s) at the top in the Solomon’s likely to be in China’s pocket, quite literally.

Sean
Sean
1 year ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Probably, the CCP have no problem with using bribery and corruption to further their ends.

Martin Young
Martin Young
1 year ago
Reply to  Sean

The CCP offered every MP who voted to keep the PM about $70,000 in funds to be used at their own discretion. They did this twice in the last year. The west pours in billions in aid and the CCP buys the country for a few million in bribes.

Sean
Sean
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Young

Let me guess, you read that in “The Socialist Worker”… 😆

Utter fantasy. Just because you desperately want something to be true, doesn’t make it true. 🤦🏻‍♂️

Last edited 1 year ago by Sean
John Stott
John Stott
1 year ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

There is a good novel called “String of Pearls”, cannot remember the author. It is a war scenario but describes how China has “bought off” these small countries and uses them to leapfrog towards Australia. War starts after a Chinese false flag. Worth looking out. Very scary but it seems to be happening in real life.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
1 year ago
Reply to  John Stott

Hi John, I haven’t read it but have heard the expression. If China spreads out too much it may need to look back over its shoulder more often. I can’t see particularly Japan, Korea not taking more steps to up their defences, which they already doing and other smaller nations, like Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines and Indonesia etc following suit. Plus US, Australia are very aware of how bloody big the Chinese navy is getting and all in our Oceania back yard and heading south and south-west!

John Stott
John Stott
1 year ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

It is a fact they want a true blue water capability. I think the key has always been Taiwan. All realistically we can hope for is internal dissent builds within China with the CCP and its policies for the population to rebel. They already seem to have some serious dissent building. A fractured China would be far easier to deal with and arguably make the Pacific/Indian Ocean community far safer.

Richard Wakefield
Richard Wakefield
1 year ago

If we still give them overseas aid cancel it!

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 year ago

So proud of these 2 ships half a world away.
This kind of thing is Royal Navy bread and butter. Keeping the seas safe and making sure everyone sticks to the rules of the seas.

Mike
Mike
1 year ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Sadly, not every nation is sticking to the rules of the sea. And the main protagonist doesn’t appear to care what other nations think nor do.

Martin Young
Martin Young
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

I does not help when the worlds most powerful nation is also not a signatory to the UN law of the sea. Team America can be great at scoring own goals.

D J
D J
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike

Hence the current arms race in East & South & South East Asia (plus Australia). Australia, India, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan & S. Korea are spending huge amounts of money on very very high end gear trying to balance a belligerent China. Some of this gear is world leading local development. Others are somewhat flying under the radar, but are also spending real money on things like A140 frigates, SAAB Gripen fighters & modern SSK submarines etc.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago

I wouldn’t worry too much about China buying the Solomon isles govt. Give them a return ticket to Sri Lanka to see how it works out in the end.

Coll
Coll
1 year ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Aug 25. According to Reuters, “The Solomon Islands Prime Minister’s office distributed Chinese government money to 39 out of 50 members of parliament twice last year, a budget committee was told, prompting criticism the payments were politically motivated.”

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  Coll

Didn’t see that thanks. It can’t be a surprise for anyone in the Solomons though. This is the Chinese playbook. It can work in a one party state but in a democracy it will end in those same politicians eventually running for their lives.

Last edited 1 year ago by David Steeper
David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  Coll

Good stuff. Forgot about the riots. It will be interesting what the election results will be. Assuming they happen.

Coll
Coll
1 year ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Yeah, they burnt down the Chinatown area and government buildings. To be honest, I forgot as well.

Jon
Jon
1 year ago
Reply to  David Steeper

They are trying to postpone the elections. They claim they can’t afford to host the Pacific Games (that China is building for them) and hold an election in the same year. If they get the votes to change the constitution, I wonder if it will be worded to make it a one-off or if it be in the purview of the government.

Distributing money to 39 out of 50, and they need 37 to change the constitution. Hmmm…

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  David Steeper

US President Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) stated, “you can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but not all the people all the time.” Hopefully this is a universal truth.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Spot on.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

…”but you cannot fool all the people all the time.”… 🤔🙄. This is what happens when quoting from memory.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

You can fool some people sometimes
But you can’t fool all the people all the time
Bob Marley (get up stand up)
I didn’t know Abraham Lincoln said it originally.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Trouble is you don’t need to fool all of the people all of the time to achieve what you want, not by a long way you just need to control those that matter and have the power through them to exercise complete control. Works totally effectively in places like Myramar and Belarus, certain places in S America and Africa indeed Russia and China while fails in others some of the old Soviet States, Sri Lanka. So depending on circumstances can go either way.

John N
John N
1 year ago

Yes it’s good to see a more permanent, or semi permanent, RN presence back here in the Asia-Pacific (and Indo-Pacific) after way way too many decades of being absent.

But…

Two OPVs are a mere drop of water in the Pacific bucket (pun intended).

Yes it’s good PR for the UK Government, but the reality is that our part of the world is not short of OPV/patrol boat capabilities anyway.

The presence is welcome, but it’s not a game changer.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

No but it’s a game changer for the uk.

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  David Steeper

How?

How is the deployment a ‘game changer’ for the UK?

How do two ‘lightly armed’ OPVs based in the Asia-Pacific do that?

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

It demonstrates intent. AUKUS and now this.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

It tells friend and foe in the Pacific we’re back.

Frank62
Frank62
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

I suppose it’s simply having any RN vessels in the Pacific at all after a long absence.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

As has been debated China is intent on using economic and secondary pressure particularly through its fishing fleet on pacific nations. You don’t need guided missile cruisers and carriers to oppose that and these along with similar vessels from other nations help in this regard, it’s why the US operates its coastguard cutters so far afield they aren’t there to threaten the Chinese naval fleet direction. If these Countries feel deserted they far more easily fall into the hands of China/Russia. Particularly when that is combined with those dictatorships telling them how the West is dying.

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Mate, I’m happy the UK is refocusing it’s attention back on the Asia-Pacific region, truely I am, ok? But let’s face facts, it’s just over 50 years ago the UK pulled the majority of their forces ‘east of Suez’, some would say the UK abandoned the region. As an Australian I’ll go a bit further, my Father and uncles fought against Japan in WWII, they and many others of their generation called Churchill the ‘Great War Criminal’ for abandoning Australia during the war, accurate it’s not, but that was how they felt. Since then we’ve looked to the US for… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

In the US the forces that maintain law and order are often referred to as the “thin blue line.”. May people everywhere of good will also support their own version of rhe thin blue line, even upon the high seas.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Never thought thin and American police would be in the same sentence😂😂😂😂😂
I the U.K. there used to be a police comedy with Rowan aitkinson (mr bean) that I think was called the thin blue line.

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Mate, I’m fully aware of the term ‘the thin blue line’, but are you aware it is yet another term the USA has stolen from another nation and claimed it was invented by the USA? The term is derived from ‘the thin red line’ which was a term used regarding UK forces in 1854 during the Crimean War: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thin_Red_Line_(Battle_of_Balaclava) Unfortunately most in the USA think that world history starts and ends at its borders, it doesn’t. Here in Australia, I like most of my American friends, but unfortunately Americans are the most wilfully ignorant people on the planet, I spend… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  John N

John,

Consider me duly “re-educated,” however, this doesn’t invalidate the suggestion that one should be grateful and supportive of any assistance from friendly quarters, especially when facing an implacable competitor/future foe.

Cheers,

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 year ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Actually, upon further reflection, there is an additional argument I wish to present: Relatively straightforward to dispatch a lightly armed OPV, but significant risk of creating martyred heroes, leading to the next round of escalation: RN CSG(s), loaded for bear, almost certainly supported/accompanied by USN CSGs. Slightly more difficult to deal w/; however assume ChiComs prevail during this encounter. ChiComs have no assurance next level of conflict will not occur, nor an effective defense for preventing literally hundreds of RN and USN Trident D2 warheads from landing on their doorstep. This is the ultimate prospect which keeps ChiComs in check… Read more »

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago

Love these vessels, we could/should double them in number no problem. These are performing vital tasks in allowing our surface combatants to be freed up and used accordingly, but could be useful in a shtf situation with minimal (time consuming) upgrades. As for the Solomons didn’t they turn there back on the queen already? If so then leave them to there new paymasters, with friends like that who needs enemies…

Bill
Bill
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

I may be far too much of an “armchair admiral” but one thought might be to order, say 6 more, OPV’s so that we can continue the job that the Rivers are doing without any interruption, but with (maybe) a hanger.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago
Reply to  Bill

A temporary hanger could be fitted, but as others tend to point out the problem isn’t ship based it’s more to do with airframe availability-the royals navy is incredibly stretched trying to maintain carrier at sea deployment X2, amphibious forces and general frigate/destroyer numbers and training aircrew.
A better solution would be containerised UAV equipped with LMM, far cheaper and could be deployed in larger numbers.

Jonno
Jonno
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

UAV is the answer for the Rivers. We just need to get on with it.
They have the facilities to handle deck landing and refuelling already.

Jonno
Jonno
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonno

How about a hangar Under the flight deck like the USN cruisers of 1940’s?

Jon
Jon
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonno

On the Rivers? That’s where marines and mission specialists live. So I think you’d be ousting the flight crew. You were right first time: UAVs in a Navy POD. There’s space.

Jon
Jon
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonno

We’re still waiting to see which UAV they’ve picked for HMS Lancaster.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago
Reply to  Jon

Hasn’t she already left for the gulf already? I take it they won’t add that capability until her return, which would be a shame because would be perfect opportunity to test it. As for which UAV unfortunately due to the lack of UK manufacturers surely has to be a Schiebel S-100, mature vehicle with a good price point + ability to carry LMM is a win.

Jon
Jon
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

BAES were contracted to integrate the UAV into Lancaster’s CMS, which may have been done before sailing. I suppose that could happen in Bahrain, but as the ship is stopping off at the annual REP(MUS) 22 exercises next month, I can’t think of anywhere better to unvail a new drone capability.

While the spec called for a mature product, Camcopter, AWHero and Skeldar all fit the bill. Leonardo could assemble the AWHero at Yeovil, so it stands a chance on those grounds.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jon
Julian
Julian
1 year ago
Reply to  Jon

All 3 look like decent choices. I agree that the Yeovil connection is a plus for AWHero although it seems to have less payload capacity than S-100 Camcopter. Leonardo specs quote 35kg at 6 hour endurance whereas Schiebel talk about a “typical” payload of 50kg but I’ve no idea if that is with a reduced fuel load i.e. not at the maximum endurance in order to get to that 50kg figure. I couldn’t find info on Skeldar V-200 payload but since if is physically the biggest of the three I would guess that its maximum full endurance payload is at… Read more »

Simon
Simon
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonno

Rivers meant to be to low cost and maintained or repaired in foreign ports. A uav better fit. Parts or whole uav easily flown out whereas helicopter is much more logistics and expense.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

The Royal Navy are in need of a general multi role helicopter. Radar, dipping sonar, torpedoes, light missile, sea venom, gun mount etc etc. or UAVs that can fill that role. I still think helicopters that can have carry people if needed would be best. The merlins and wildcats just aren’t enough.
I would say more merlins that are multi role instead of just torpedoes and ASW but need a price compare for 30, versus a medium weight in between merlin and lynx.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Merlin is an incredible platform but unfortunately is too expensive to build and run so unlikely to be expanded. What could/should happen is when the army selects it’s next battlefield helicopter order that in decent numbers to allow it’s wildcats to be traded to the navy, an existing platform with ready trained pilots/maintainers would be a cheap and reliable way to go if you ask me.

Jon
Jon
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

Sounds right to me.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

Agreed.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Isnt the contract just given to Leonardo regarding unpiloted helicopters aimed at addressing much of this sort of multi role capability or at least to explore their practicality anyway.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

‘They’ don’t exist. This island chain is ‘governed’ by people who make ours look like fasting monks. The Chinese have bought them outright.

I agree with you about these vessels and the role they can play. UAV’s would seem to be a popular choice for upping their potential.

Last edited 1 year ago by Barry Larking
Frank62
Frank62
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

Can the ANZACs afford to have a Chinese naval base right on their doorstep? (Tongue firmly in cheek, but who’d have thought they’d have done it in the disputed SCS shoals where they had a very tenouous claim?) What’s next? Create artificial island bases on the Great Barrier reef?

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank62

There are urgent talks going on between the USAF and RAAF of bringing them in on the B21 program, If we was aus I wouldn’t be at all pleased with the way China acts with its island hopping.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 year ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

I see that the US is considering Australias loyal wingman (is it called Moonbat these days?) for its own potential use. I wonder if this might become an AUKUS programme eventually or at least filter into our direction.

Last edited 1 year ago by Spyinthesky
FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 year ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

I get the feeling the whole AUKUS initiative is to allow US industry to hoover up all the big defence contracts. Yes we’re are rightly supporting our fellow allies in the Pacific and we might gain access to a few select programs but at what cost to the UK industry? It will certainly be interesting what loyal wingman project they settle on and might have ramifications for us, the way the US industry push it’s gotta be SKYBORG with maybe allowed local input?

John N
John N
1 year ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Moonbat? Try again (you silly pommie!).

It’s Ghost Bat:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_bat

Jon
Jon
1 year ago

Off topic a bit, but staying with Asia/Pacific navies, I read in Naval News that S. Korea is having third (or is it fourth) thoughts about their carrier. CVX might be off again. Does S. Korea need a carrier or would it be better off with a bigger Air Force and more F-35As? Of course if you cancel something like that, you may end up with neither.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
1 year ago

The Australian Defence Minister/Deputy Prime Minister is coming on a four day visit to Europe this monday, he will be visiting France for further talks on mending their relationship, Germany to meet defence companies and touring British shipyard(s).

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 year ago

A refusal.for DipClear is nothing new and happens occasionally. Dubai did it to a UK task group a few years ago so they went elsewhere.