A further 200 British troops will be sent to Afghanistan bringing the total to 900, the Ministry of Defence have confirmed.

600 were initially deployed and 100 were already in the country.

The troops are to be sent to Kabul to assist with the evacuation effort in Afghanistan.

British forces from 16 Air Assault Brigade previously arrived in the Afghan capital to assist in evacuating British nationals and entitled persons amidst the worsening security situation there.

British transport aircraft including C-17s, A400Ms, C-130s and Voyagers are currently involved in evacuation efforts.

Huge British airlift effort underway in Afghanistan

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Patrick
Patrick
1 month ago

Where’s the EU in all this? On holiday.

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne
1 month ago
Reply to  Patrick

Don’t worry the EU is developing a plastic army, navy and air force just like we have plastic bobbies in the UK. Did you really expect the EU to do anything? Can you imagine an EU army? 26 different languages and decision making processes by 26 different Generals….I can only say that China has the right approach don’t get involved and just make money. These countries are sink holes for money and blood…Wait until the Afghan refugees flood across Europe via the porous borders of the Schengen zone with sleeper cells in the UK ready to activate because of our… Read more »

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

A US general said the other day that the West can’t do anymore since the ANA refuses to fight. True. Too bad they didn’t realize that 10+ years ago when it was widely known. What a waste of lives, money, ect.

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Sorry, but that’s bollocks. I have worked with the ANA and the majority of them were really decent guys. In the main they hate the Taliban and what they stand for. I was in a bloody lot of firefights with these guys.

The problem they have is the lack of confidence in their abilities. When things go to s*** they can quickly revert to type if they don’t have confident leadership. This is where the military advisors that we and the US used were crucial and the lynchpin to not only to get them to fight but also to win.

Julian1
Julian1
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

So daveyB, interesting observation. Why are the taleban more effective than ANA then? They don’t need NATO advisors. Why is they stand and fight but the ANA don’t? They are from the same stock?

James
James
1 month ago
Reply to  Julian1

They have absolute belief in a book written thousands of years ago and a way of life they want back from the dark ages and all the fruits it brings.

Pete
Pete
1 month ago
Reply to  Julian1

Firm belief James highlights below and for many a firm fear of probable repercussions for them and family if they don’t follow the instructions of the Taliban leaders.

DaveyB
DaveyB
30 days ago
Reply to  Julian1

It may be something as simple as Darwinism. In the past 40 years they have been fighting the Russians and then the Western forces. The Taliban came from factions within the Mujahideen that fought Russia. They had competent leaders. Come 2001 they got pushed out of the country and were sheltered by sympathizers in Pakistan. They were also allowed into Iran. From 2002 up to 2015 after being rearmed by both Pakistan and Iran they took the fight back to the Western forces. Lots of Taliban were killed, significantly more than Western forces. I can’t remember exactly the figures but… Read more »

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Julian1

The Taliban do not have to follow rules. They are brutal and many are forced to fight or risk their family being killed. It is amazing what humans are capable of if desperate. It is also far easier to wage gorilla warfare and terror attacks with a few moderately trained people with little equipment. Just look at the fact that all the combined might of the Western armies had great difficulty dealing with the Taliban. How on earth did we ever think the ANA could do anything without our support? One person put it like this. “It is like taking… Read more »

Meirion x
Meirion x
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Also don’t forget, the ANA had their supporting equipment and heavy air support taken away from them recently.

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Actions speak louder than words. When it came to defending their country and their citizens the ANA failed miserably. Their latest surrender without firing at shot this past week proves it. NATO could train them for 100 more years it wouldn’t matter.
The Afghan government is also to blame. They make Western politicians look honorable. The entire system is designed to fail. And the ones that suffer the most are the innocent civilians that just want a better life for their families.

Last edited 1 month ago by dan
lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  dan

If you are faced with being overrun by crazed taliban fighters and the horrors that come with that (I have heard stories of them skinning people alive). I am sure most of us would melt into the background if that was an option. Our army was pushed back and had to retreat lots of times against the Taliban. The difference was that we had overwhelming force to protect certain areas that were safe to fall back to. The problem the ANA had was that we had took away significant equipment (Drones, Close air support, armour etc) and left them with… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
30 days ago
Reply to  dan

You suggest the whole ANA surrendered without firing a shot. I understand it was only a few hundred who deserted.

Steve R
Steve R
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

That, and haven’t they also not been paid in months?

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

“The problem they have is the lack of confidence in their abilities”.
This is the nub of the problem. It’s a question of faith; in yourself, in your officers, in your mates, in your government, in your President. Zero on all counts.
Compare with the average Taliban fighter; young and a member of a revivalist Sunni Islam sect with inclusive pan tribal political beliefs dating back to the Indian mutiny ( aka war of independence). The nearest western parallel might be Christian evangelical Corbynistas with AK47s.

Nathan
Nathan
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

I’m a Christian Evangelical, I don’t think one of us are Corbynistas given we’re usually very pro-Israel and he was a raging anti-semite. Plus, I just cannot conceive of a situation where I’d take up an AK-47 except to defend our country or my family or throw off a totalitarian state, pretty much the same as most people I think. The New Testament is clear that Jesus’ kingdom is not of this world – “If it were, my servants would fight [for me]”. There’s not one jot of support for a militarised Christian church in the NT. I’m pretty mainstream and I… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Nathan

Whoa! Just trying to point out how difficult it is to map what’s happening to our western world. 🙂

David Steeper
David Steeper
30 days ago
Reply to  Nathan

Well said sir.

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

I suppose that’s the point Davey, if they can’t get their shit together and run their own operations after 20 years and billions spent, they are never going to and we can’t stay holding hands forever…

It’s all academic now, it’s a matter for historians to debate

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

You have forgotten again, the Afghans had an air force, but could only equipped it with light aircraft inc. A-29 Tucano.

If you remove the foundations of any building, it will fall down!

Last edited 30 days ago by Meirion x
John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Indeed they did Meirion, the A29, an excellent counter insurgency and light strike asset.

I’m not really following your thread, are you advocating we should have stayed in Afghanistan forever, another 5, 10 years?

What would your exit strategy have been?

Genuinely interested, it’s always interesting to hear different possibilities.

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

My exit strategy John, would of been to keep a token force in Afghanistan of mainly air support forces and for guarding green zone etc.to be reviewed and debated every 3 years with performance targets set for the Afghan Gov. which incl. aid amounts.

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  Meirion x

It’s a sensible alternative Meirion, I have to say. In a different reality, your main problem would have been convincing the powers that be to sign off on billions in aid for years to come. Those in the corridors of power are probably secretly glad they no longer have to fund Afghanistan. It might be putting 2×2 together and coming up with 5 here, but I think a backroom deal with the Taliban was reached by the US government regarding their eventual return to power and the west leaving them alone, providing they kept terrorism out of the country… Possibly… Read more »

andy a
andy a
29 days ago
Reply to  Meirion x

the A29 and the russian gunships they have are more than capable of devestating the taliban if the ANA had pushed to keep them out of urban areas. Could have smashed them but Taliban knew that and pushed into urban areas

Meirion x
Meirion x
29 days ago
Reply to  andy a

It looks like the ANA has manly desovled with a section reforming in the North.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

I don’t think that the majority of the ANA refuse to fight. When I served alongside them in 2008/9 (10+ years ago) they were disciplined, eager to learn and taking the lead from the West on security operations. But I accept that I am out of date.

Some aren’t getting paid and are demotivated but most are ok. They have sufferred horrendous casulaties due to the Taliban’s tactics of choice which offer little prior warnng or defence.

The loss of western air support has been a body blow for the ANA.

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Isn’t the proof of the pudding in the eating. Clearly if the ANA were brave, skilled and cared for their country as well as women and children wouldn’t they stand and fight? Life is cheap in Afghanistan as they don’t value it in the same way we do. Money is the only mantra they know as well as the Koran. The ANA forces collapsed in days and this old nugget about lack of air support doesn’t hold water either. ANA had 300,000 soldiers and the Taliban had a maximum of 75,000 and the Taliban had no air support either. Numerical… Read more »

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

The British in the 19th century knew the Afghans for what they were – hardy, brave but also rapacious, cunning and duplicitious.Trusting them was never an option. One British officer of the time remarked’ I’d be surprised if anyone thought an Afghan’s word is worth anything. Their loyalty belongs to family clan tribe etc but even then they betray their neighbours over feuds or envy. Years sgo we treated them as they derserved not showered them with money.

Last edited 30 days ago by OldSchool
lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

You seem to forget that we also tricked and conned them too. We were not far off as untrustworthy as they were. We would offer to protect them, then we would get them to fight with us and then leave them to their fate.

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Rubbish! We supported them well with pay, equipment and training. They could have easily put up a decent fight. They didn’t. This hand wringing that the West betrayed them is complete utter tosh. Our mistake was in thinking we could turn Afghanistan into a liberal democratic state – history shows A-stan for what it is.

andy a
andy a
29 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

you got that right, the west’s error is thinking we would turn them into a modern western country with democracy. most of the uneducated don’t even know what it means. Iraq was a fairly advanced state before but afghanistan????

andy a
andy a
29 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

the Afghan airforce had 20 x A29 attack planes, 8x mil 24 gunships and 68 x light attack “little birds” with out western airpower. US and UK supplied them with large amounts of training and spares and up till last week were helping on ground. If the ANA had done there part thats a damned big hammer to drop on 75000 taliban

Bluemoonday
Bluemoonday
30 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

You know this is all highly disrespectful to the many hundreds of European families whose sons and daughters died while on service in Afghanistan?
Blame the EU all you like, but you may wish to also question our own policy on this completely predictable crisis. Or perhaps not.

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago
Reply to  Patrick

I hear the EU leadership is planning an emergency meeting to decide on the sandwiches for the main meeting in December.

Don’t panic, the German military machine is poised like a tiger, to stand by and do absolutely sod all, as per usual.

Perhaps the Luftwaffe could deliver a strongly worded letter to the Taliban 😂😂

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Whatever happened to that mighty warship the Germans sent to the S.China Sea a few weeks back ? Haven’t heard a word. Hope it wasn’t one of there lopsided ones. It could be sailing around and around in circles just off Lowestoft.

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

🤣🤣😂

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

I remember it being said when I was in Afghan 12 years ago that the Germans would not operate at night.

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Or indeed, the vast majority operate no more than 400 miles from Berlin, in the daylight…..

Waste of space, I would remove them from NATO and let them form the nucleus of an equally pointless, endlessly hand wringing and procrastinating EU military alliance…

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Note the German hypocrisy on politico eu currently. Germany is complaing that the US hasn’t done enough. As they let the US, UK do the fighting and dying they should keep their ****** mouths shut!

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

You couldn’t make it up mate…..

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne
30 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

I heard that the Luftwaffe have a new tactic instead of bombs they will drop wads of Euros – whilst they are still worth something…I feel safer already now the French and German’s have announced the EU army.

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

You do realise the idea of an EU army is a UK one?

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Unfortunately the Andrew avatar does Not realize this!

James
James
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Any evidence of this as everything ive read says Macron was the one who both suggested it and was/is pushing for it?

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

It looks like an EU army could become more trustworthy then the US forces!

Meirion x
Meirion x
1 month ago
Reply to  Patrick

The UK asked the Europeans if they could help to fill in for the Yanks for a token force to remain in Afghanistan. The EU’s could Not be arsed!

Last edited 1 month ago by Meirion x
lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Meirion x

I am not sure that is exactly what they said… I think they were worried that without the US it would be a half hearted attempt and therefore undoable. There are many factors at play here. For instance the UK does not feel it could have gone it alone due to the past issues we have had in Afghanistan. There is a lot of politics at play in that area of the world that makes things very complex.

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Most likely that was the case. It was the US’s war in the end, we just the junior partner!

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Patrick

EU is lead by Merkel. Question answered. lol

Joe16
Joe16
1 month ago
Reply to  Patrick

French, German, and Turkish A400Ms are all in the mix from what I’ve read- no idea what that means with regards troops on the ground. But bearing in mind there are 6000 US troops in addition to our 900 Paras, not sure how many more will fit on the airport…!

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Patrick

The EU is busy defining a new standard for mobile phone chargers 🙂

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

🤣🤣😂

Darren hall
Darren hall
30 days ago
Reply to  Patrick

According to other countries news sites. French, Dutch aircraft have arrived at Kabul and taken citizens and Afghans out. Germany are operating out of Uzbekistan with Transalls as ferry aircraft. Canadian, Australian and NZ are using UK/US flights but will back fill aircraft when required, RCAF/RAAF have C-17s ready to go. The big issue that people are forgetting is Kabul is overrun, and the airfield compromised. If you have been to Kabul, then you are aware that the Airport is surrounded by mountain tops. These were patrolled back in the day to stop the Taliban using then as O/Ps or… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Darren hall

Peaceful withdrawal was negotiated as part of deal between the Taliban and the US. They will not interfere.

Darren hall
Darren hall
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

They also said they are not interested in retribution and have changed…

But they are hunting ANA and ANP, banning Females, closing schools and kidnapping young girls as ”slaves” for their victorious soldiers…

I hope you are right, but have a terrible feeling you may not be…

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Darren hall

Do you have a source for that? The Taliban representative in Doha just interviewed on Sky says their policy is to provide girls education up to and including further education and to allow women to hold down jobs.

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

And at the same time female Students are being turned away from university and families have been ordered to hand over their daughters so that they can be married off to Taliban fighters.

Steve
Steve
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

I’m still of the belief the takeover was agreed in advance. A whole counties army collapsing in a handful of days is just not realistic. Everyone talks about Vietnam but that fell two years after the US left, not days after. Seigon might have fallen quickly but it was the final part of a two year compagn. As such I think the western forces will be left alone as they evac, but I’m sure they have a backup plan, with so many soldiers on the ground and Apache etc in the area, I would guess they are monitoring for potential… Read more »

Last edited 30 days ago by Steve
Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Notwithstanding the agreement there is always a possibility of a breakdown in the Taliban communications and command structure and a rogue soldier taking independent action so surveillance drones and a couple of Apaches are a wise precaution. So far things are going ok I believe.

Steve
Steve
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

True. The risk is the tailban didn’t expect to be in control of the city so fast and have yet to group up for an attack on the airport. I just hope not.

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

And we trust them? Given that the Taliban are fighting alongside Al-Qaida and Islamic State? They may seem organised but they are a collection of many different factions with many different ideas on what they want the outcome to be.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

The bottom line is that the Afghan people have the right to self determination like anyone else and their choice of cultural values. We have tried to impose by a combination of military force and bribery a hybrid culture of western secularism which incorporates retained elements of the influence of the tribal war lords. I would argue that most of the excesses attributed to the Taliban and Islam ought to be attributed to that tribal feudal culture. The Afghans have rejected our model of society. We need to get over it. The default legal system will be Sharia ( basically… Read more »

Last edited 30 days ago by Paul.P
lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

I am not sure the Afghan people have chosen the Taliban as their leaders… I rarely see people trying to cling to aircraft after a UK election… They were not given the choice. They had not told the US and UK to pull out, in fact they had asked them to stay. We gave them zero choice in the matter and left them to the hands of a brutal regime focused on ruling by fear and terror. The excesses of the Taliban are partly rooted in their extreme version of Islam and also their desire to rule by terror. The… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Its not ‘our fault’. There is no need for a guilt trip. People are panicking in anticipation an adversarial retribution tribal culture which has been the norm for centuries but which has been routed and disowned by the Taliban. The Afghan people are happy to get rid of a western inspired top down elite motivated by money and have it replaced by an ordered society where running your business and family life can happen in peace. The Taliban have their roots as a revivalist Islamic movement and intends to follow Islam properly, not as appropriated by ruling tribal lords for… Read more »

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Sorry, I did not realise I was speaking with the Taliban leader… The Afghan people did not make a choice to reject the Western presence in their country and instead invite the Taliban in! There was no election, no discussion with the people and no discussion from Western Forces. One day the ANA turned up at a base to find the Americans had left overnight! The Taliban have not turned a new leaf. There are reports from all over Afghanistan of atrocities being committed on their march through the country. The Taliban have their roots in oppression. Remember it was… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

😂😂😂 I’ll take the leadership compliment.
Biden’s decision is a challenge for everyone to snap out of paranoia mode and start treating other people, Muslims, including the Taliban, with respect as human beings.
Then everything works. We didn’t sell Typhoons to Saudi Arabia by telling them to give their women more freedoms.

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Feel free to take it as a compliment if you support raping children and oppressing women, while brutally murdering opposition.

I for one respect people of all religions and cultures. I do not respect rapist and murderers though… Call me traditional…

We should not have sold typhoons to Saudi Arabia, not until they fix their human rights issues.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

O come on. I don’t believe the Taliban or Islam supports the raping of children or murder. Its not fair to tarnish the whole of a group with the actions of individuals. ‘Oppression’ of women is a culturally relative concept more to do with feudalism than Islam, but I do agree does not allow women the same licence as they enjoy in a secular west.
We agree on the arms trade but reality is that money talks.

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

No guilt trip here. Tho our political leaders who came up with the develop and democratise A-stan strategy should be going thru intense existential anguish ( one hopes) for the best part of 20 years of idiocy.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Indeed. It was perfectly justifiable self defence to go into Afghanistan to get Osmama and weaken Al Queda. And since the country of war lords essentially had no one leader with whom you could deal and who had the control to police Al Queda it seemed a good idea at the to use money and troops to build a country. But national identity always comes from within by fighting an invader. Psychologists tell us you recognize yourself by recognizing who you are not. England came into being by coalescing to beat the Danes, who were allowed to stay if they… Read more »

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  lee1

Personally I was hoping a lot of Guardianista’s would be clinging to outbound UK aircraft after Brexit. Sadly it didn’t happen…..

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Congratulations on getting this politics post past the mods😉

James
James
28 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Taliban did it properly, I was under the impression the UK would morph into North Korea the day after Brexit, still no signs of that promise happening.

andy a
andy a
29 days ago
Reply to  Darren hall

they dont want to, they want the west out with out casaulties so they can claim to be reformed then take country back to dark ages

Bluemoonday
Bluemoonday
30 days ago
Reply to  Patrick

I believe it was our PM who was about to go on holiday with Kabul about to fall, but do not let the facts get in the way of a bit of casual xenophobia

Andrew
Andrew
30 days ago
Reply to  Patrick

The uk and us started this shit show. I dont blame other countries for staying out.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

Correction. OBL and AQ started this shit show by killing thousands in New York, bombing an embassy, and assassinating one of the UK’s main allies in the region.

Would you have done nothing in response?

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago

I’m a bit surprised that the military transports have not just been forward positioned to Cyprus.

IRL they could also be operating out of any friendly civilian airport with a segregated area.

So I am a bit surprised that it is military all the way to the UK and not just a hop to the closest friendly airport and then onto a charter flight.

That way at least the airframe hours are reduced and the cycle time / surge capacity is massively increased with the available airframes.

dan
dan
1 month ago

Probably because most people didn’t think the ANA would surrender and change sides so quickly. The ANA is a bunch of cowards that just sold out their own people to a bunch of crazy religious zealots.

Meirion x
Meirion x
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

What would you do if you were Not paid for months by your bosses?
And someone else come along to offer to pay you to work for them instead?

All Taliban have to do to melt the ANA away, is to get the CASH out!

Last edited 1 month ago by Meirion x
Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Numbers of ANA soliders surrendering or refusing to fight is quite low for the size of the army.

James
James
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Whats happened to the rest been executed?

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  James

Read their special forces have got priority on US and UK airlift. Apparently the Taliban aren’t happy with them for doing most of the fighting.

lee1
lee1
30 days ago
Reply to  dan

Not many have changed sides as far as I am aware. Some have been forced to fight for the Taliban as their families are being held as a threat. Others have melted into the background in order to not be executed. Others have likely been killed.

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 month ago

RAF aircraft including C-17 C-130 A400 are all running shuttle runs between Kabul airport and Al Minhad Air Base in UAE, It’s then the Voyagers ferrying from Al Minhad to Brize Norton.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Ok that makes more sense.

Why was the singular C130 sent? Was it all that was available from the remains of our C130 fleet or was it all that SF could spare just in case they had to deploy.

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 month ago

The C-130 went in before the Voyager carrying 16X arrived so I’m going to assume SF deployed first to secure the airport/Embassy?

Lusty
Lusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Who knows? Quite rightly, a lot of it is being kept hush-hush aright now. Media outlets had images of troops arriving on at least one C17 as well. I think this is a case of using any and every available air asset to move troops/non-combatants/equipment. SF guaranteed to be there in some capacity.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Ok – now I get it.

Thnx for the context.

John Clark
John Clark
30 days ago
Reply to  Donaldson

I think that’s probably the reality. A half squadron 22 deployment to lead the way and ride shotgun, probably also including an intelligence cell to meet up with Taliban leadership on the ground, to negotiate the evacuation agreement and an effective ceasefire.

Coordinating with US Spec ops too.

I shouldn’t be surprised if there isn’t a fall back plan involving remote temporary bases out in the Afghan boondocks, able to bring in firepower and Chinooks, if this all turns to shit…

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Ha! According the the DM this morning they list the transports involved but for “Security reasons cannot say how many” !  😆 

Donaldson
Donaldson
30 days ago

There is a list on Twitter showing the huge effort, Interesting to note 3/8 C-17s and 2/20 A400s involved from RAF, I would’ve thought more A400s would be deployed but maybe not needed as C-17 is more capable?

Anyhow good effort from all involved.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Was first reported as 4 C17, 1 Atlas, 1 Herc.

Plus the 3 Voyager on the UK leg.

Tarnish
Tarnish
1 month ago

It is also much easier to process people at Brize than risk them scattered around civil airports especially at such short notice.

The airframe hours just do not matter in situations like this, this is one of the many varied tasks we have such assets for.

Considering the short notice and conditions we are working in, I think we are doing a great job in extremely difficult circumstances.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Tarnish

You don’t want Press to photograph some people coming off the plane ie Interpreters, intelligence staff etc. Hence use BZZ.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago

This is why we have transport aircraft. This is not the time to worry about airframe hour’s. We don’t have them to sit looking pretty at Brize.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Fair point

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago

I thought they were doing this at Minhad, UAE. Thats where I transferred flight coming back from Afghan a decade ago.

Last edited 1 month ago by Graham Moore
James
James
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Has been alot of activity at Minhad over the last 72 hours to say the least.

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 month ago

Correction needed on your tweet about Diego Garcia, That flight is returning Royal Marines from Talisman Sabre in Australia.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Thanks -that had really confused me!

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
1 month ago

From what I’ve read about the region, what we’re witnessing is realpolitik in action. Way back in 2001 when the campaign to oust Al Queda began, many warlords and militias switched sides purely due to American cash dollars and a desire to be on the winning side. The obverse happened as soon as it became clear Nato and America were leaving, ordinary Afghans knew without Western support the government couldn’t last, the power and money now lay with the Taliban and the same process happened. Outside of the affluent elites in the cities, not too many Afghans are probably bothered… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Posse Comitatus
Meirion x
Meirion x
1 month ago

Especially if they were Not paid for months by the Gov.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago

The average Afghan is not interested in western style democracy. They want peace, stability, jobs, improving living standards, more literacy, better healthcare and tribal cohesion.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Indeed. Rising living standards probably funded by the 2nd largest copper deposits in the world. Well, all those US electric car charging cables have to come from somewhere …..

James
James
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Which China will now be selling to the US!

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago

Well said Posse. Frankly the reason the West keeps losing these interventions is because our leaders want to export our system to countries which just can’t take it onboard. We need realpolitik ourselves and limit our campaigns to purely short term military objectives with very minimal ( preferably no) footprint in country on the ground. A-STAN was winnable – until we went for a boots on ground pacification rebuild strategy. It was dead the moment that occurred.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Exactly my view too. No occupations!

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
29 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Exactly. Following the initial demise of the Taliban and Al Queda in Afghanistan in late 2001/early 2002, there seemed to be a naive belief that we could democratise the entire region, this same naivety reared its head in Iraq, Libya, Syria etc. Places where there is no history or tradition of people power. It becomes clear very quickly that in the heartlands of these countries lie ethnic and tribal alliances and feuds, going back many generations that no company or battalion commander was equipped to deal with. Added to that was the fact that from 2002 onwards the whole focus… Read more »

Rob
Rob
1 month ago

What a disaster this is. The orange man negotiated the deal and terms, conditions. But it was up to Biden to enforce those terms. He didn’t – he just pulled the plug. Just plain stupid. This is all on Biden, orange man has been gone 8 months now. Biden could have cancelled or revised the Trump deal like all the other Trump deals you eviscerated.

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob

Until we know what the deal was, we can’t judge biden. It’s entirely possible that the deal was for the national army to step down and let the tailban retake the country, at which point the deal has been followed, it seems to have been a pretty peaceful transition so far. For sure biden could have ripped it up, but doing so would mean zero chance of another deal being made and until we know if there were some positive clauses as can’t judge.

Last edited 1 month ago by Steve
Pete
Pete
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

Agree. I really feel for the Afghan people but the West can’t and (IMHO) shouldn’t be fighting what is effectively an internal war between alternative ideological interpretations of Islam. If stabilisation (rather than the rooting out of Al-Qaeda) is required then there are plenty of capable moderate Muslim nations that can support that effort under the banner of the UN albeit with necessary air support from the West.

One thing is for sure. Mr Putin will not be happy and will be worried about more instability in several of the Stan’s to the north of Afghanistan.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  Pete

The Afghan people will be very happy with the way things are turning out, They will say good riddance to western designed top down system of foreign educated elites which was paying lip service to democracy while in reality protecting the power bases of the tribal war lords. There will be peace, girls will get education to university level and continuity of employment. It will be normal to wear an Islamic head scarf, as they do here in the UK. What we need to do now is open a new chapter and start by offering humanitarian aid to Afghanistan.

David Steeper
David Steeper
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Sarcasm ? Surely ? Hopefully ?

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Not in the least. If you want to treat people respectfully you have to deal with them where they are not where you would like them to be. You also have to be of practical help if you want to gain their trust. Then they might be open to more ideas. You don’t just waltz in with a western style know it all government and army and say ‘here’s one I put in the oven earlier’. I see the Taliban victory as an Islamic analogue of the French revolution. The Afghans have ditched feudalism but instead of liberty, equality, fraternity… Read more »

Last edited 30 days ago by Paul.P
David Steeper
David Steeper
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

We’ll agree to disagree. You’ve every right to express your opinion. That’s western democracy.

andy a
andy a
29 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

You believe the taliban? OMG

Paul.P
Paul.P
29 days ago
Reply to  andy a

You have to start by giving them the benefit of the doubt if you want peace. No progress is possible without trust. It’s about building a relationship now.

Last edited 29 days ago by Paul.P
James
James
28 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Building a relationship by handing over billions in cash on top of the money they will be creaming off the drugs trade? Are you mad?

What exactly will they do with all this money, spread it equally between all civilians or will some people higher up be keeping a larger chunk? Ah yes the latter not so different to the corrupt western democracies you like to mention hey.

Paul.P
Paul.P
28 days ago
Reply to  James

I don’t think I said anything about giving them lots of money, although since we are not funding troops we might have some to spare. This is a new situation for all concerned. We should be providing practical humanitarian and industrial aid. The Chinese are planning to reopen their copper mine. We just need to be sensitive to local rules. A training school for nurses would be good; a fashion house not such a good idea perhaps. This thing about the role of women in Islam is a spectrum. There are lots of Muslim women fighting for the Kurds for… Read more »

James
James
27 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

If the Taliban have mellowed I will eat my socks, they are giving it a good go in the press of being a more welcoming group so far but the stories emerging from within the country say very differently. The remnants of ISIS will be over the moon a new caliphate has been created and no doubt be moving over, along with numerous other nut jobs from around the planet. Humanitarian aid is going to be needed unless they actually do a remotely sensible job of running the economy but it must be actual aid and not money that is… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
27 days ago
Reply to  James

Aid organisations keep accounts. Your donations and government additions go to those who need help. Well, it’s true that terrorist groups will find it easier to hide in Afghanistan . It’s a big country with remote geography and being Muslim easier to blend in. That said the Taliban will bring order to chaos and a consistent system of justice that the people understand and notwithstanding females having to dress modestly, accept. Mellowing is likely to be a patchy affair. The test will be how they respond to street protests by women. I understand the Taliban and UK troops are conducting… Read more »

James
James
26 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

They will bring order to the chaos, you mean the chaos they have brought themselves?

Ah justice, yes forgot about that eye for an eye policy they have.

Im sure the public floggings, stoning to death and mutilation of limbs all decided in a fair legal hearing of course will bring the chaos they have bestowed upon the country under control straight away.

Not a brave new world at all, going straight back to the dark ages and yes the people who dont wish to succumb to this will have to be very brave indeed.

Last edited 26 days ago by James
Paul.P
Paul.P
26 days ago
Reply to  James

The present chaos is a result of Trump’s ‘America first’ policy; basically selfishness. I suspect the delay in implementing the withdrawal agreement signed by the US has arisen because the Biden administration has been subjected to pressure to renege on the deal; to stay in Afghanistan. Biden was screwed either way. We are where we are. The press are reporting the UNs concern about the need for immediate large scale aid to avoid a humanitarian crisis; food, medical supplies, shelter. Whatever the Americans choose to do we should take a diplomatic and military lead with France, Germany and other European… Read more »

James
James
24 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Acting in anyway is purely going to be down to the Taliban, they may and probably dont want interference from the outside as the more outsiders in the country the more information about what is going on will spread out. Eu nations are in no way going to want to take a lead in this as it will involve military intervention which will take the EU a decade to decide on. O.k trump did the opposite of Obama in ending the campaign but what was the US supposed to do, continue policing the country indefinitely pouring more cash, assets and… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
24 days ago
Reply to  James

Actually agree the Taliban won’t consider foreign troops at all. I just hope aid workers are welcomed. We are where we are…

Andy P
Andy P
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

Whoah there Steve, what’s with this opened minded ‘let’s wait and see’ approach, it will never catch on, the Internet is for getting your rant on mate. 😉

Rob
Rob
30 days ago
Reply to  Andy P

We don’t need to “wait and see,” they are already going door to door in Kabul. You guys are too nice….which reminds me, I’ve got this lovely bridge I am selling in Nevada….interested?

Andy P
Andy P
30 days ago
Reply to  Rob

 😂  Yeah, getting it out of your system on the internet should put the fear of God (the white one with the beard, not the brown one that you can’t draw) up them. One hundred percent, here is the place to get it all sorted. Did you even read the posts or just default rant about the evil ‘Muzzis’ ? For the record, I’m not happy about how this has panned out but being a big boy I’ll try not to get too worked up over something that I have no control over. Apart from engaging on online… Read more »

Rob
Rob
30 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Of course we can judge him! Question is, WHY WOULDN’T Biden be responsible? He’s the President. On his watch. He also could have changed the deal like all of the other Trump deals he eviscerated, he didn’t do this. He never tried. He just cut and ran and never gave allies a warning either. Catastrophe from a failed President and….he has only been in the job/…..7 months. Think about that. That “press conference?” Dear god that was terrible. A talking head, clever political gobbledygook pointing fingers and not taking responsibility. You are far too kind to this man, meanwhile women… Read more »

Last edited 30 days ago by Rob
Steve
Steve
30 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Until full details are known, any judgement is based on gut feeling and guess work. I highly suspect he will be held accountable since your right it’s hard to see how he couldn’t be, but first facts and not just click bait news stories guessing what really went down.

Andrew
Andrew
30 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Ah yes. The taliban would always stick to the deal wouldn’t they. You right wing nobs are all the same.

Rob
Rob
29 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

I’m not right wing. It’s not about me matey it’s about the humanitarian crisis that Biden created. Get with reality it’ll do you the world of good!

Challenger
Challenger
1 month ago

More troops suggests the situation is starting to fall apart at Kabul Airport.

Taliban are very unlikely to attack western forces within the perimeter but wouldn’t put it past them to start dealing out punishment to any Afghans trying to escape. British and American soldiers aren’t going to fire on civilians, leading to utter chaos on the runways.

The humiliation of getting permission from the Taliban to evacuate our people really takes the biscuit!

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  Challenger

With a combined force of around 6000 now in afgan, I can’t see the Taliban being stupid enough to try and attack the airport, but it does seem the US/UK are worried they might.

Although its a bit unclear where the troops have been sent, are they all in kabul or are they spread across the country.

Last edited 1 month ago by Steve
Harry Bulpit
Harry Bulpit
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

It would seem their all in Kabul. The main fear, besides a few rough fighters is not the Taliban, its simply a swamp of civilians flooding the runway and possibly destroying aircraft in the process. The more men is simply for more fists to beat them back.

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

From what I understand all troops are at the airport, I wonder if capturing a nearby airfield and using that for transports is an option at this point, Helicopters can be used to transfer those at Kabul airport to a more secure austere airstrip/port.

Rob
Rob
30 days ago
Reply to  Challenger

suggests?” No it actually is, it’s real.

coll
coll
1 month ago

Be prepared for tighter laws on opinions.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

Some sort of “would inspector sands please report” code George?  😃 

Lisa also T’d on other thread.

Lusty
Lusty
1 month ago

Biscuits as well?

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Lusty

😆

JohnG
JohnG
1 month ago

I wonder why such a small number of troops. Special forces?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  JohnG

2 PARA are not SF.

JohnG
JohnG
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Appreciate the post, didn’t spot the 2 para link in the article. Where’d you find it?

Tom Keane
Tom Keane
1 month ago

More British Troops to be sent to Afghanistan … why?

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 month ago
Reply to  Tom Keane

Help secure the airport, It’s a total mess at the moment with civilians on the runway clinging onto cargo planes.

Christopher Allen
Christopher Allen
1 month ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Yeah, a mate of mine apparently saw a video on Twitter of a US transport aircraft taking off with some people still grappled to the side. Utter madness if true.

James
James
1 month ago

Yeah the video is online now.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Tom Keane

To assist with civilian evac. from Kabul airport.

Steve R
Steve R
30 days ago
Reply to  Tom Keane

To secure the airport and help evacuate people. Clearly the situation is becoming chaotic, and if people are holding onto planes’ landing gear until they fall off to their deaths, they are clearly desperate enough to try forcing their way into a plane.

The additional soldiers are there to ensure the evacuation is orderly.

Dave
Dave
1 month ago

Do the Taliban have any AA capability e.g the CIA supplied Stingers from earlier conflicts? Maybe a bit ‘out there’ but in these days….

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

They do but it’s been a pretty peaceful takeover so far, it feels like the tailban are fine for the evac to happen peacefully.

Steve R
Steve R
30 days ago
Reply to  Steve

The last thing they want is for a plane to be shot down and risk the West coming right back again to avenge it.

Steve
Steve
30 days ago
Reply to  Steve R

They know the west won’t come back. It would be the ultimate PR stunt for them, showing strength against the scared and running west. It also shows that there is no point fighting against them, as even the US can’t save you if you do.

We don’t really know what the agenda of this new government is, hopefully it’s to establish peacefully and their focus will instead by on strengthening their grip on the country.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

Stingers long gone thank god. But there are plenty of DSHK and 23mm unfortunately.

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

It only takes one to cause a major disaster, especially if they are packing the planes as tightly as is being reported. I’ve seen pictures of Apache’s operating over the airport, so assume they have a solid ring around it to protect the planes in the most dangerous part of takeoff/landing.

David Steeper
David Steeper
30 days ago
Reply to  Steve

If Taliban have current manpads they’re more likely to be Russian. Think Pak army kept some Stingers from when they were supplied to fight Soviet occupation but that was over 30 years ago now. Unless Pakistan has received them more recently. But pretty sure they’d have used them at some point over last 20 years if they had them.

Farouk
Farouk
1 month ago

This journalists Twitter site, airs a very good account of what is happening in Afghanistan.
https://twitter.com/babaktaghvaee/status/1427355926877593601?s=21

dan
dan
1 month ago

“On July 8, Biden said “the likelihood there’s going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely.”
What an idiot. lol

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Hard to believe that he is an experienced politician with a supposedly good knowledge of foreign affairs.

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Biden is the poster child for why there should be an age limit on becoming President. He can’t even speak coherently unless he reads from a teleprompter. And the American media holds him to a much, much lower standard than they’ve ever don’t for any previous President. Whenever he says something that’s totally crazy they just laugh it off or just don’t report it. Is just one of the reasons I stopped watching, reading the “mainstream” media years ago. They have nothing to do with the truth anymore. Just pushing their own agenda. So sad.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Trump then Biden then Trump again ?   :wpds_shock: 

RobW
RobW
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Do you think he will stand aside and let Harris run for the next term?

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Hard to blame him, his top generals also came out and said the same things. It’s their job to know how well an army is prepared and read intel, and yet they so missed it.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  dan

Biden is not an idiot. His predictions are as good as the info he is given. He has the wisdom to know that when you are in a hole the first thing you do is stop digging. This (peaceful) withdrawal is supported by the majority of the American people on both sides of the political spectrum. It was negotiated by Trump and should come as no surprise.

OldSchool
OldSchool
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

I’m not an American but I support Biden on this. The Afghans have had years to get their act together. They never were going to ( see my other posts on here). So at last a line can be drawn under the blood and treasure that the US and its best allies ( exclude Germany France etc here) have spent. The US will pivot towards facing China etc instead of being involved in a backwater. The only sad thing about what has happened is that it should have happened years ago.

Paul.P
Paul.P
30 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

As Winston Churchill is reputed to have said, you can always rely on Americans to do the right thing, after they have tried everything else 😉

andy
andy
1 month ago

I just hope we have the assets to make sure all our troops get back from there..

Joe16
Joe16
30 days ago

Anyone know if we have any helicopters in country to assist getting our people out of the embassy etc? I read that the Pumas and Chinooks had been recalled a couple of months ago. I wouldn’t want to take a ground route through Taliban-held Kabul to get them out…

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Not that I am aware of.

Joe16
Joe16
30 days ago

I was worried that would be the answer…
I’m sure the US will do their best to help out, but they’ll have their own to look after. Unless the embassy staff were already at the airport, that means the Paras are looking to risk their own version of Mogadishu ’93- no idea what the distances involved are.

Deep32
Deep32
30 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

About 500 miles to Karachi and a thousand to Dubai. Bit much for helicopters without tanker support!

Joe16
Joe16
30 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

Hi D32, I wasn’t thinking of the helos taking people all the way out of the country, more for shuttling between the embassy (and wherever else we have people) and MK airport. You’re right, trying to actually get anywhere safe out of the country in a chopper would be rather too ambitious!

Deep32
Deep32
30 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Sorry mate, mis read your post.

Joe16
Joe16
30 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

No worries, easily enough done!

Ryan Brewis
Ryan Brewis
30 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

I think they have, though I’m not totally sure. Rather surprising if they haven’t.

Joe16
Joe16
30 days ago
Reply to  Ryan Brewis

I hope so, wouldn’t want to be driving Kabul’s streets with Taliban everywhere…

John David Mayall
John David Mayall
30 days ago

To my nephew, Cpl Joseph ‘Joey’ Etchells 2RRF killed by an IED in Helmand 2010 aged 23 RIP my friend, you live on in our hearts

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
30 days ago

Just putting this out there: Is the shoe now not on the other foot so to speak in terms of the Taliban having to defend everything. Should we not now do the old WWII Free-French/SOE type of things and basically S!**!-up the Taliban by various means. Also set-up a small(ish) defendable area in the north, where the remaining tribes and Afghan special forces/soldiers can operate and shelter those wishing not to be under Taliban rule. It’s basically then civil war, but every Afghan man AND woman (like the Kurds) would then have the option of going somewhere and picking up… Read more »

Meirion x
Meirion x
30 days ago

I think hostilities would need to break out with the West again for that to happen so soon. It’s possible a conflict could breakout between the Hazaras of central Afghanistan, a different ethnic group. A partition of North and South maybe needed.

Last edited 30 days ago by Meirion x
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
30 days ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Resistance is already forming in the north. Massoods son, the commander who was assassinated and who had links to SIS.

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
30 days ago

…I heard some aircraft/transport and about 500 ANA managed to get out safely.

I presume we will never hear about it, but I hope our SIS is playing an active role in co-ordination. I appreciate that it is complicated with warlords and different ethnic groups. Of course there is the whole heroin trade issue, and I think the Taliban will be going down the narco-state route for revenue.

Once all the journos get out of Kabul and the Taliban revert to type, then the “Free-Afghan Forces (?)” can start to pick them off – check-point-by-checkpoint.

Rob
Rob
30 days ago

So the 2 Para battle group + the Coy group who were already there to protect the embassy is now operating independently or as part of the US 82nd Airborne Division? I presume it is a NATO op so makes sense to be under US command for this. Seems the Taliban are going to let NATO go without further conflict. What they do after we’ve gone I’m not optimistic about.

Andrew D
Andrew D
30 days ago

Sending more Troops does this not not show we should not be cutting the Army 🇬🇧

JohninMK
JohninMK
30 days ago

Sending in hundreds/thousands of troops in C-17s was the easy part, withdrawing them safely could be the problem. After dropping off their load of soldiers, a C-17 could reload with all kinds of civilians, including refugees and depart. But even that attracted irate locals on the runways. Imagine what might happen when C-17 after C-17 come in empty or with food and then only took soldiers out. Maybe 20+ times. The problem comes when they are down to a 1000 left, the runway clearing Apache has been destroyed to prevent its capture and they are incapable of holding the increasingly… Read more »

Rob
Rob
30 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

John it seems clear that the Taliban have agreed to respect the evacuation so when it does come down to the last NATO Btn leaving the the Taliban will already be holding an outer ring around the airfield.

JohninMK
JohninMK
30 days ago
Reply to  Rob

It certainly looks as if that will be the plan. In many ways the longer the evacuation takes the better as it will give the Taliban time to get the area under control. There also appear to be attempts to restart the civil side but I suspect fuel stocks may be an issue. But there will be a point at which the Taliban will call a halt as they do not want a brain drain of skilled workers. Embassy/NGO staff with papers and corrupt leaders is one thing but comms and power grid staff is quite different.

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
30 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

..and how are former UK Afghan staff, contractors, and Afghan former forces going to get to the airport when called forward? They are being told to wait in place until called. Crumbs!

Would UK forces go and get them? Gulp! “Black Hawk Down” all over again.

David
David
30 days ago

The elephant in the room is that our stand by Bn of 600ish bods is not enough – sometimes it really does come down to boots on the ground and compared to the American force which by somevreports is circa 9k we kid ourselves that 600 is some kind of magical number. Given the need to just sleep, you’re losing bods, take away the HQ function ditto which means far less Toms that are effective fighting troops over the coming two weeks. Perhaps the Europeans had the right idea after all, stay away unless you can do a la America… Read more »

David
David
29 days ago

DaveyB16 August 2021 at 11:13(posted on thinpinstrippedline copyright 2021). There is a DaveyB on this site too. Well eorth the read: As one who has done multiple tours of Afghanistan from 2001 up to 2015, including infanteering, engineering projects and instructing. I can honestly say, that the fall of the ANA was a forgone conclusion. Anyone who has served with the ANA will have a similar opinion. They are basically a light infantry force that were totally dependent on the Western Nations for the heavy support, be it artillery or air. Yes, they had a fledgling Airforce, however, they only… Read more »

Steve
Steve
24 days ago

This has shown a clear capability gap within the UK armed forces. Firstly the issue of lack of man power, the army should never have been cut back so far. But to me more crticially is the lack of ability to get out. The US has helicopters designed for long distance flight with mid air refueling and little bird heavy attack helicopters that can be rapidly stuffed into cargo planes, meaning when the time comes their last forces can race onto helicopters, covered by heavily armed Blackhawks and be out in seconds. We have none of this. Meaning if the… Read more »

Last edited 24 days ago by Steve