BAE Systems has awarded a further five contracts to suppliers worth more than £100m, as progress on the Type 26 frigate programme continues apace at the company’s shipyards in Glasgow.

The new contracts will support 250 jobs, with the Type 26 programme sustaining more than 4,000 jobs in total across the UK, helping to support the nation’s economic recovery by maintaining much-needed skills and capabilities. More than £1bn has been invested across the programme’s supply chain to date, with more than 100 suppliers globally.

“The contract awards come as construction on the final unit of the first Type 26 frigate, HMS Glasgow, begins. All 57 units of the anti-submarine warfare ship are now under construction. The suppliers awarded each of the five new contracts will contribute essential work to the programme as HMS Glasgow moves to the outfit phase in readiness to enter the water for the first time.”

The contracts have been awarded to:

  • Denholm Industrial Services (Glasgow) – surface preparation and painting
  • Malin Group (Glasgow) – Vessel load out and float off
  • CBL (Hartlepool) – cable and associated works
  • Kaefer (Nottingham) – insulation products and installation services
  • SCA (Dorset) – access and containment

Secretary of State for Defence, Ben Wallace MP said:

“The Type 26 programme has proven itself in terms of cutting-edge design, international defence exports and creating and sustaining British jobs. This latest round of contract awards will see companies from the south coast of England to the banks of the Clyde benefit from over 250 highly-skilled jobs and multi-million pound investment.”

BAE Systems Naval Ships Managing Director, Steve Timms, said:

“Each of our new suppliers brings a unique capability that is essential to ensure the safe and continued progress of this nationally important programme. It’s fantastic to see the first of class, HMS Glasgow, taking shape at our facilities here on the Clyde. She is a source of great pride for our workforce who have worked with real energy, commitment and innovation in recent months to ensure we meet our customer commitments.”

Designed and built by BAE Systems in Glasgow, the Type 26 frigate is an advanced anti-submarine warship, which will deliver critical protection of the Royal Navy’s Continuous At Sea Deterrent and Carrier Strike Group.

Each Type 26 will be equipped with a range of world-class capabilities including the Sea Ceptor missile defence system, a 5-inch medium calibre gun, flexible mission bay, Artisan 997 Medium Range Radar, powerful bow and towed array sonars.

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Nigel Collins
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Nigel Collins

We really do need to speed up the build process on both the Type 26 and 31.

As I mentioned in a previous post

“These two posts are an indication of how Russia is currently upgrading its navy, combined with China, it makes for a formidable fleet!”

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/russian-navy-sees-surge-in-naval-shipbuilding-milestones-in-july

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins
George
Guest
George

Hi Nigel,
Yes agree the UK along with the rest of NATO need to speed up on projects. The UK should be taking the lead on its military projects and enhance procurement on all fronts.
Although may be interesting to see how Rusia will shape up as its economy is in a rather fragile state and may not be able to fund all the major projects.
Cheers
George

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

Time will tell no doubt!

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

It appears to be doing so on at least one front!

22 JULY 2020

UK, Italy and Sweden launch trilateral industrial discussion on FCAS

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/uk-italy-and-sweden-launch-trilateral-industrial-discussion-on-fcas

ChariotRider
Guest
ChariotRider

One thing I am not clear on at the moment is Government involvement from the three countries. The UK put £2b into the project, a clear demonstration of intent, but how much have the Swedish and Italian Governments put in? Whenever I read anything about these MoU it seems as if it is the companies that are leading the process, which is fair enough provided all three Governments are stood behind their respective industrial partners. I believe that Leonard and Saab have put some of their own capital into the project as have Rolls Royce and BAE Systems so it… Read more »

Gunbuster
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Gunbuster

Errr not really. The intelligence reviews on the state of the major units of the Northern Fleet are sobering reading. The fleet is old and outdated and they are struggling to have new vessels built on time and old ones overhauled. The former Red banner fleet is a shadow of what it once was. For major units It currently has something like 6 mid 80s era destroyers, an un-modernised Kirov class cruiser, a modernised Slava, a new frigate that has taken 14 years to build and commission ( And you think BAe is bad at building ships!) , half a… Read more »

Geoffrey Hicking
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Geoffrey Hicking

I presume that Janes has never been a reliable source of information for serious analysts (such as yourself). What are the best sources of information for the Russian navy? I’m getting sick of every quoted source being (rightfully) rubbished here, and I don’t want to expose myself as an ignorant know-nothing.

RobW
Guest
RobW

Personally I just wait for someone to post some rubbish, get my popcorn, and wait for Gunbuster to put them straight. I need to get myself a new hobby!

Seriously though, UKDJ, Save the Royal Navy and Think Defence are all very good. I also read Defense News a fair bit, its mainly US focused but does have some interesting pieces on global issues.

Maybe we can persuade Gunbuster to setup his own site too?

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

Enjoy your popcorn!

“ROYAL NAVY SHADOWS SEVEN RUSSIAN WARSHIPS IN THE CHANNEL AND NORTH SEA”

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2020/march/26/200326-royal-navy-shadows-seven-russian-ships

RobW
Guest
RobW

I was joking Nigel.

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

“If the general NATO strategy is to generate a credible deterrence against Russian aggression then defending the North Atlantic region must be part of that mix and because of proximity, the UK must take a lead role. The NATO Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 is commanded from Northwood, elements of this would join the operation in times of heightened risk. With the Type 23/26 Frigate and Type 45 Destroyer, Astute, Merlin/Crowsnest and Meteor/ASRAAM armed F-35B’s aboard a QE Class aircraft carrier, protected by land-based fighter aircraft and supplemented with long-range maritime patrol aircraft, the UK will be able to field… Read more »

Gunbuster
Guest
Gunbuster

Not got the time. To busy fixing the sleek grey war canoes of various nations.
I blame the bloody operators. If they didn’t use them then I wouldn’t have to fix them!!

Joe16
Guest
Joe16

The War Zone is another US centric one that has some good stuff about military tech, US military in general, and international affairs. Mostly good quality stuff and some really great photos.
As far as the rest of the world is concerned, hard to say…

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

Strange how they are mentioned in a Wikipedia report on the Soviet navy. Janes is a highly respected source of military information.

Determining which ships are operational or in refit can be difficult. Jane’s Fighting Ships has noted in recent editions that some ships have little capability, but remain flying an ensign so that crews are entitled to be paid.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_active_Russian_Navy_ships

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

You can also read reports from the CRS

“China Naval Modernization: Implications for
U.S. Navy Capabilities—Background and
Issues for Congress
Updated May 21, 2020”

https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL33153.pdf

john melling
Guest

Interesting reading that report, infact it reminds me of the
US congress report of 1983.
That included the US discussing the British Armed Forces during the Falklands War and what they learned from it

Samething was happening… the US being outpaced and outnumbered by USSR now its China

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

It appears to be the case once again as you quite rightly point out John. “Naval strength cannot just be assessed by numbers but approximately 70% of the PLANs vessels are considered modern or very modern and today includes 2 aircraft carriers, 36 destroyers, 52 frigates, 250 corvettes and 74 submarines. The third Chinese aircraft carrier is under construction and is estimated to be 85,000 tonnes and their first to feature CATOBAR / EMALS design. To the particular concern of Taiwan, the PLAN is also building up its amphibious forces with the commissioning of at least two 40,000-tonne Type 075… Read more »

Daveyb
Guest
Daveyb

It is the reason why Japan has started converting the Izumo to operate F35Bs. There is a lot of bad history between China and Japan. Some of which is being played out in and around Okinawa and the islands between it and Taiwan. Japan has announced that both the Izumo and her sister the Kaga will be converted so they can operate F35Bs. China meanwhile has been flexing its gums, saying it is against their constitution, so is unlawful. Whilst they continue their training with their two STOBAR carriers and build their third larger conventional carrier. As you mentioned China… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

It never pays to underestimate your adversary in my book, particularly when they float, are well-armed and in larger numbers! “However, considering the PLAN enjoyed zero experience operating an aircraft carrier prior to Liaoning entering service in September 2012, the speed at which the PLAN moved with training and flying their J-15 airwing and exercising with escort ships is also undeniably impressive. The pace at which Shandong was constructed, launched, and trialled at sea before entering service, is also impressive given it is the first ever aircraft carrier built by the Chinese shipbuilding industry. Both carriers will likely serve key… Read more »

Meirion X
Guest
Meirion X

The EMAILS tech that the PLAN is to use on their new carrier, is most likely stolen IP tech, some from a British company based in Lincolnshire!

The economic fight back needs to begin with reviving the Trans Pacific Partnership being based on a rules based economic block.
And also to establish a NATO type Organization of the Pacific and South East Asia, excluding China and North Korea.

john melling
Guest

Your talking about bringing back SEATO ;P

Meirion X
Guest
Meirion X

I think it needs to take in a wider range of countries in the Pacific, as well John.
I think Russia should be Offered TTP on condition of a main rule of TTP which should be democracy.

Mr Bell
Guest
Mr Bell

Plan are moving onto type 76 amphibious assault helicopter carriers LPHAs. Bigger again then type 75s and more worry for Taiwan. Source. Warships IFR of course

Mr Bell
Guest
Mr Bell

For naval matters worldwide but with a strong interest in Royal Navy. Warships IFR. I get the magazine but website is ok. Tends to be a few weeks behind latest magazine publications.

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

“Our global competitors continue to grow their naval forces, and they are expanding their areas of operations and collaboration with each other,” the budget overview report says. ” We simply have a lot more to protect from increasingly capable maritime adversaries who will present challenges to our economic security and indeed, our very way of life.”

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/32145/new-pentagon-map-shows-huge-scale-of-worrisome-russian-and-chinese-naval-operations

Robert Blay
Guest
Robert Blay

Well said mate, many who use this site very much like to big up the Russian navy in many ways, and and what you have said, is what the true state of the Russian fleet is in.

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

Nobody is trying to “BIG UP” the Russian Navy Robert, but simply stating concerns both we and other nations have in relation to the growing threat that Russia poses on many fronts as my post from the defence select committee tends to suggest.

2 hours ago
UK and US say Russia fired a satellite weapon in space

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-53518238

Robert Blay
Guest
Robert Blay

I’m not denying the obvious increase in Russian military activity on many fronts, but the state and threat of the Russian fleet is often overplayed, and many so called Russian technological advances over the west, are again usually wildy in accurate.

Nigel Collins
Guest
Nigel Collins

“The intelligence reviews on the state of the major units of the Northern Fleet are sobering reading.” Agreed. “The Northern Fleet itself, although a shadow of its former strength as part of the Soviet Navy, has benefitted from a major period of Russian naval recapitalisation through successive State Armament Programmes. Despite lengthy delays which have stretched programmes over decades, Russia’s newest classes of nuclear submarines are entering service to replace late-Cold War-era platforms.81 Russia’s latest generation of strategic ballistic missile submarines, the Borei class variants, are being deployed in the Northern and Pacific fleets.82 The newest class of multi-role nuclear-powered… Read more »

Fedaykin
Guest
Fedaykin

Indeed, even their better yards in St.Petersburg that have seen some kind of modernisation in recent years are struggling to deliver even basic units. Other yards of note are obsolete in facilities and practice when it comes to ship building. Add to that the break down of relations with Ukraine has been a serious blow to Russian ship building as Ukrainian manufacturer Zorya-Mashproekt were their main source of fairly modern Gas turbines. An alternate from UEC Saturn has as of yet failed to be delivered. To compound issues Russian industry has also failed to deliver new medium size diesels, this… Read more »

Finney
Guest
Finney

So basically not much different to our inability to procure medium sized diesels domestically! Also probably related to a lack of rail-orders in the 90’s.

TrevorH
Guest
TrevorH

Yes. It’s worth reminding people about all that.

Julian
Guest
Julian

And even ignoring whatever Russia and/or China might or might not be doing there are compelling economic reasons. Our best outcome coming out of this Covid-19 crisis is to get a V-shaped economic recovery, as as steep an exit as possible and a stimulus package is a critical component of that. Speeding up and expanding the T26 and T31 builds would be a very valuable contributor to that in terms of increased employment and, even on orders already placed, revenue and profit boosts for all contractors involved. (Accounting rules mean that the value of contracts awarded don’t immediately appear on… Read more »

BB85
Guest
BB85

I think the T23s can still hold its own thanks to the upgraded Sonar, Radar and Sea Ceptor. I’m worried about ASM and that there appears to be no urgency to replace it. My main gripe about the delay to T26 is that it has cost us a fortune to refurb the T23s when they should have been out of service and building them so slowly costs more so we are basically pissing money away for no benefit.

RobW
Guest
RobW

I know what you are saying about the ASM issue but in reality when are heavy ASMs going to be fired by a ship? You cannot use them in congested sea lanes or littoral zones, not if you care about where they may land. They will only ever be used in open blue waters which is the domain of SSNs. Yes we should have ASMs on the T26 as there will not always be a friendly sub about, but it isn’t necessarily a must have on day one. The 5 inch gun, martlett, Sea Venom, Spear 3 from the F35s,… Read more »

Ron5
Guest
Ron5

Your comments are correct about Harpoon but not about more modern ASM’s like NSM.

geoff
Guest
geoff

Hi BB85. If we needed to up the size of the escort fleet then perhaps keeping refurbished T 23’s in service might be the quickest route-overlapping them with the Type 26’s as they come into service. What kind of hull life might they have gentlemen?

geoff
Guest
geoff

Here in SA we still have a few of the Israeli designed strike craft in service dating back over 40 years so perhaps some of the later build 23’s are capable of soldiering on which would justify the money spent on the upgrades?

Meirion X
Guest
Meirion X

The LIFEX T23s could have deck launch Mk 41. (Tactical) tubes, replacing the Harpoon tubes?

Fedaykin
Guest
Fedaykin

No, there isn’t the room below deck and even if there was it would be pretty unwise putting major cuts into the structure to get them in.

Any Harpoon replacement on T23 will have to be container launched from the same spot behind the VLS silo.

Meirion X
Guest
Meirion X

I think you misunderstood what I ment?
I ment non deck penetrating launchers on the deck like Harpoon tubes.
https://www.baesystems.com/en/product/adaptable-deck-launcher

Sorry for any misunderstanding!

David Barry
Guest
David Barry

I know, I know, the budget, personnel yada yada.

However, not enough and too slow on production.

peter french
Guest
peter french

I wonder with the renewed interest in Scotland in another independence referendum whether its wise to make these significant investments in Scotland .
Its been made clear that should they vote to leave that they will not have any defence contracts and rightly so.
Cake and eat it comes to mind

Paul C
Guest

It is not wise as like it or not Scottish independence will become a reality, maybe before the decade is out.

Harry Bulpit
Guest
Harry Bulpit

It’s a catch 22. Keep investing and you keep investing in a uncertain business. Don’t invest and you fuel the independence argument. Although I agree. We should allow a referendum and start removing all investment in Scotland and stop any Grant’s from Westminster.

Andy P
Guest
Andy P

Yes Harry, Scotland is still part of the UK (and hopefully will be for a long time yet) so you can’t really discriminate just in case it decides to leave (although some sectors including charity funding have done so in the lead up to the referendum). I can understand why some would see it as an option but it might be cheaper to ‘wait and see’, if Scotland is staying in the UK (and using ship yards as the yardstick) then to move them ‘just in case’ would be an expensive business.

Peter Crisp
Guest
Peter Crisp

I hope that’s brown paint and not that the ship is rusting already as that would be a tad worrisome.

geoff
Guest
geoff

Red oxide spot priming over the welded areas

Rfn_Weston
Guest
Rfn_Weston

Bet me to the post there old bean!

geoff
Guest
geoff

Hope no hard feelings Old Chap?

Rfn_Weston
Guest
Rfn_Weston

None at all!

Rfn_Weston
Guest
Rfn_Weston

It’s a primer applied over dressed weld areas – after dressing the welds, steel is bright and unprotected so they prime it to offer some corrosion resistance prior to final paint system being applied.

Peter Crisp
Guest
Peter Crisp

I thought that the Navy might have been going for the rusted look that some people like with cars.

Rfn_Weston
Guest
Rfn_Weston

Or the Russians with their ships? 🙂

Julian
Guest
Julian

The worn look is also a thing in the world of electric guitars. It’s called “relic-ing” (as in making a brand new guitar fresh out of the box from the factory look as if it is already a relic). Fender (and maybe other manufacturers) even offer the option when ordering a top-end made-to-order guitar to select the degree of relic-ing to be applied at the factory after manufacture ranging from not-quite-pristine (just mess it up a factory-fresh guitar a little bit) all the way up to totally beaten up as if it’s been on the road for the last 50… Read more »

Trevor G
Guest
Trevor G

It’s even better than that – the retail prices for relic’d gibson & Fender guitars are way higher than the regular range (what we used to call “new” or “mint”). In adition there are now “name” relicers (if that’s a word). so you are buying a brand new guitar and then paying someone several hundreds of £ to bash it up for you. And the point is? Pass….

Julian
Guest
Julian

Maybe that could be a new RN strategy – deliberately relic our warships so that if we are ever in a conflict an enemy vessel first encountering one of our frigates at sea might think that it had already been in a huge firefight and was badly beaten up with crew casualties and damage control parties struggling to patch up damage whereas in fact it was fresh out of refit, fresh crew and all systems in working order. One snag though – I wonder how much BAE would charge to relic a warship; if would give some extra work to… Read more »

Paul T
Guest
Paul T

The Dull Grey Platework has the appearance of Steel that has been Shotblasted,im guessing it might already have had some treatment thats why Primer is used at this stage on the Welded areas only.

James
Guest
James

Nice to see my home town of Hartlepool get a mention, very rarely in the news for anything good. Weirdly appears to be a media blackout regarding it in the north east!

RobW
Guest
RobW

To be fair they get a mention on Sky Sports every weekend, usually when Jeff is bemoaning another relegation battle.

Darren
Guest
Darren

Whilst this is all good stuff: “The new contracts will support 250 jobs, with the Type 26 programme sustaining more than 4,000 jobs in total across the UK, helping to support the nation’s economic recovery by maintaining much-needed skills and capabilities. More than £1bn has been invested across the programme’s supply chain to date, with more than 100 suppliers globally.”

This could be said for a project that can have a higher UK content than the Type 26 highly specialised and expensive systems based type of warships, namely the Fleet Solid Support Ships!

James
Guest
James

Hopefully will be alot more pressure to keep them in the UK now.

DaveyB
Guest
DaveyB

Has anyone noticed the armament of the T31 as shown on Babcocks and the RN websites? This is the ship painted with the two tone disruptive pattern camouflage.

It looks like the the “main” gun is still the 57mm in the A position and looks like SeaRAM in the B position. In the centre, there are two sets of quad cannister launches for presumably ASM then the VLS farm with 24 hatches. Then in the Y position a 40mm, weirdly no secondary DS30 mounts?

T.S
Guest

Yes I noticed that too, I just presumed it was an early concept picture. Would we need searam and seaceptor? The 24 cells would be nice though.

Meirion X
Guest
Meirion X

Not Searam, it is a short range heat seeker missile

Paul T
Guest
Paul T

I think that Rendering has been discussed on here before,that is an Export Version being offered to Poland from memory.

Daveyb
Guest
Daveyb

So why is it on the RN site?

Paul T
Guest
Paul T

I cannot find that version on the RN website but on Babcocks its pretty self explanatory – the Product if you can call it that is the ArrowHead 140,of which the T31 is merely a version of.The site highlights its adaptability and configurability so many versions are available.SeaRam has already been trialed in the Royal Navy and it didnt get any further,enough said i think.

Daveyb
Guest
Daveyb

Just re-checked the website, the image has been removed – funny that! I knew that the RN had done a trial with SeaRAM quite a few years ago and found it wanting, clearly didn’t explain why, but it’s telling that they’re keeping the Phalanx for CIWS.