The National Cyber Strategy sets out how the UK Government say it intends to protect and promote UK interests in a ‘rapidly evolving online world’.

This is the first major milestone following the publication of the Government’s Integrated Review earlier this year.

“The strategy builds on the significant progress made on cyber over the last five years which has seen the UK cyber security sector grow rapidly, with over 1,400 businesses generating revenues of £8.9 billion last year, supporting 46,700 skilled jobs, and attracting significant overseas investment.

Through the strategy, the government is calling on all parts of society to play their part in reinforcing the UK’s economic and strategic strengths in cyberspace – this means more diversity in the workforce, levelling up the cyber sector across all UK regions, expanding offensive and defensive cyber capabilities and prioritising cyber security in the workplace, boardrooms and digital supply chains.”

According to the announcement, keeping British ‘cyberspace’ secure will involve:

  • greater workforce diversity;
  • expansion of offensive and defensive cyber capabilities;
  • prioritising cyber security in the workplace and digital supply chains.

James Hadley, CEO of Immersive Labs, was quoted by InformationAge here describing the focus on diversity and prioritisation of cyber security as “encouraging”:

“The time to elevate people to the same level as technology in the fight against growing cyber threats is now – and clearly, the Government recognises this. Remaining resilient in such a high-paced threat environment requires the optimisation of human cyber capabilities across entire organisations – and, indeed, entire nations. Cyber security is no longer just an issue for IT teams and technical people; the entire workforce has a role to play in preparing for, responding to, and remediating against cyber threats.

I hope this new National Cyber Strategy heralds a shift in mindset, putting the responsibility for cyber security on all of us and opening the door to a new pool of talent. At the end of the day, the more diversity and range of skills and knowledge we have in our armoury, the more we’ll increase our chance of successfully tackling what our adversaries throw at us next.”

You can read the new ‘National Cyber Strategy’ by clicking here.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
10 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
john
john
3 months ago

So diversity is the number one priority oh well at lease two and three are still there I hope.

David Steeper
David Steeper
3 months ago
Reply to  john

It’s pretty much compulsory to include that in all press releases. Keeps the Guardian happy and that’s what we all live for isn’t it ! 😀

john
john
3 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Yes you are right silly me forgetting.

David Steeper
David Steeper
3 months ago
Reply to  john

Ok this time but don’t do it again.

john
john
3 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

He He need a laugh thanks.

David Steeper
David Steeper
3 months ago
Reply to  john

👍

Colin R Brooks AKA Dung
Colin R Brooks AKA Dung
3 months ago

You guys got there first but please WTF has diversity got to do with Cyber Security?
Yes, we need to make sure we do not exclude anyone when searching for talent but that is all. Political correctness gone mad.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
3 months ago

Waffle.

Would be good to get a bit more information on the NCF beyond the minimal amount released.

The problem with cyber is that they can say they are spending X and because it is classified one cannot judge hoe much capability is improved for the outlay.

Frank62
Frank62
3 months ago

We clearly need a basic analogue(e.g. Old style admin back-up) to keep the country going as & when our IT is disabled. We lived without it for thousands of years, so while we all love having it around, we should be prepared & appreciate it’s not critically vital unless we put all our eggs in that basket.

Ian White
Ian White
3 months ago

One of the biggest problems for security is t vast number of Android and Apple mobile phones that are not updated. This is primary caused by Google and Apple only supporting phones for a short time and then expecting users to buy new – even if the phone is very useable. This also applies to computers, but to a lesser degree, and reflects the fact these market are dominated by just a few companies who do what they what in the market place. Phones should be supported for at least 10 years and computers for 15 -this policy would be… Read more »