Saab will be demonstrating, for the first time outside of Sweden, a new generation of the Combat Boat 90 (CB90) fast assault craft.

The firm say that it will be shown from 14-17 September at the DSEI exhibition in London, where visitors will have the opportunity to go aboard to learn more about its new capabilities. While this isn’t open to the general public, I’ll be going and I hope to take a look.

“This CB90 Next Generation (CB90 NG) features new capabilities as well as many of the features that the original CB90 is famous for. Designed to swiftly transport marines and other forces, CB90 is renowned for the ease by which troops can rapidly get on-shore and depart again, be it a beach or an awkward, elevated rocky shore. CB90 NG builds on that capability and, depending on the mission, can take on different roles in the sensor and combat chain. CB90 NG includes a new combat management system and sensors for surveillance, ballistic protection, as well as further improved stealth, manoeuvrability and speed.  By providing amphibious forces with multi-mission capabilities, CB90 NG is an even more potent means by which to project force from the sea.”

CB90 Next Generation will put on a display as part of the twice-daily DSEI waterborne demonstrations outside the main hall. Saab say that it welcomes visitors to come along to where the craft will be docked at the marina section outside the main hall to see CB90 NG for themselves.

“This is not an ordinary model-upgrade: it is the result of 30 years of experience from the user’s side from across the world, combined with continuous technical development. The result in CB90 NG is a new platform ready to take on multiple roles,” said Anders Hellman, Vice President and Head of business unit Docksta within Saab’s business area Kockums.

The example of CB90 NG to be shown at DSEI was recently delivered to the Swedish Navy, with the designation Docksta CB 90HSM. The company say that is representative of how CB90 Next Generation is customised to meet a customer’s requirement, and DSEI gives armed forces the chance to see and learn more about this adaptability in person.

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Pacman27
Pacman27
5 days ago

I am a long term admirer of these vessels and believe the RN/RM should have a fleet for raiding purposes.

As the littorals become more contested and the marines themselves become a smaller force it means we need to have an asymmetric threat ability and these vessels provide that.

the RN/RM could really benefit from having a fleet of 128 of these or similar and whilst I know that won’t happen, they do offer a real change in capability that we could take full advantage of, if fitted out properly.

farouk
farouk
5 days ago
Reply to  Pacman27

The Royal Engineers have operated the Combat Support Boat since the 80s. the first iteration (Mk1) was initially designed to replace the army tugboat, but came into its own during the Falkland campaign , it could carry 22 men, or 18 in kit. fitted with 2 hydojets and could stop on a sixpense from full throttle. It was replaced by the Mk2 which is a bit bigger. Granted its not as Gucci as the Swedish one, but we don’t experience the adverse weather they do. And when I was operating one in the Falkland’s (2 tours) I often worked with… Read more »

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Last edited 5 days ago by farouk
farouk
farouk
5 days ago
Reply to  farouk
Donaldson
Donaldson
5 days ago

I’ll take 16 for the Royal Marines please

eclipse
eclipse
5 days ago
Reply to  Donaldson

That doesn’t seem sufficient. Just for comparison’s sake, let’s remember that the Swedish Navy has 147 and has ordered 18 more, for a total of 165 boats. Secondly, each boat can carry up to 21 Marines. The chances of all 16 being available in the same place at the same time are minimal. To be able to land a battalion sized force like a Commando 40 we would need around 45 boats there, which means we would need at least 90 overall.

Donaldson
Donaldson
5 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

Maybe another 0 was to be added but it would be a nice boost for the Marines raiding capabilities. This picture shows a Swedish Amphibious Battalion.

CB901.jpg
eclipse
eclipse
5 days ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Looks impressive. Due to the potential American budget increase and the french budget increase I still think that it is possible our defence budget can get one as well. These boats have a price tag of around £2m, so getting 120 or so of them would cost the same as a single Type 31, however the capability increase would be worth far more. If the budget finds £250m, I would take these over another Type 31 any day.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 days ago

How are these superior to the ORC’s already in service?

And weren’t they already tested back in the day by the RM? And rejected then.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 days ago

Just read that the RM have given up their 4 LCAC’s.

What replaces them??? Or another cut.

Bloke down the pub
Bloke down the pub
4 days ago

Their manoeuverability would make them ideal for playing silly beggars with the Spanish boats that intrude into Gibraltar’s waters.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 day ago

To fit them on the davits on the LPD would require a huge investment ad major structural work They are bigger and heavier than the current LCVPs and the davits wont take them. They cannot land vehicles and the carrying capacity is less than an LCVP.

Now that raiding is back to the fore they may be looked at again but their cargo capacity is the issue.

Donaldson
Donaldson
1 day ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

I was under the impression CB-90 would replace the Offshore Raiding Craft which would fit inside the well deck.

CB90.jpg