In an audio clip recorded earlier today, Typhoon jets can be heard to welcome American B-52 aircraft to the United Kingdom whilst over the coast of western Scotland.

Four B-52s arrived today with two of the group splitting off and heading to northern Scotland. They were soon greeted by Typhoon fighter jets for a bit of a ‘photoshoot’ to collect imagery to mark the occasion before heading off to practise bombing the weapons range at Tain north of Inverness, some of those photos are displayed below.

The bombers, as said above, received a warm welcome to let’s listen in courtesy of open-source intelligence analyst @mm0ndx. If you don’t already follow this account I recommend you do so now.

The link below contains the audio of the event.

What’s happening?

B-52 Stratofortress aircraft, support equipment, and personnel from the 5th Bomb Wing, Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, arrived at RAF Fairford, England, today to execute a long-planned Bomber Task Force mission.

Bomber Task Force missions are regularly scheduled U.S. European Command and U.S. Strategic Command joint mission series.

According to a statement:

“En route to RAF Fairford, U.S. Bomber Aircraft integrated with British Typhoon aircraft and Portuguese F-16s currently assigned to NATO’s Icelandic Air Policing mission. Bomber aircraft also integrated with British Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) to conduct bilateral Close Air Support training.  The mission focused on enhancing readiness and interoperability for the controllers responsible for coordinating airstrikes to support ground forces.

Regularly integrating with our allies improves our cooperation and operational capacity, capability and interoperability. Occurring since 2018, bomber rotations through Europe maintain our readiness to execute a wide variety of missions across two continents, sustaining peace through deterrence.”

American bombers arrive in Britain

“With an ever-changing global security environment, it’s critical that our efforts with our allies and partners are unified,” said Gen Jeff Harrigian, USAFE-AFAFRICA commander.

“We’re in Europe training and collaborating together, because consistent integration is how we strengthen our collective airpower.”

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
66 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
JamesD
JamesD
6 months ago

Anyone know what weapon is on the centre pylon in the first image of the USAF tweet? If that’s the centre pylon? Can’t be sure

farouk
farouk
6 months ago
Reply to  JamesD

James wrote:
“”Anyone know what weapon is on the centre pylon””

I take it you mean nbr 3, I presume that is the Litening pod. But I am more than happy to defer to those in the know and be corrected:

plane.jpg
Last edited 6 months ago by farouk
Steve M
Steve M
6 months ago
Reply to  farouk

targeting or decoy?

Last edited 6 months ago by Steve M
JJ
JJ
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

Typhoon can’t have fuel tanks on in-board, only Centre wing

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Yes. It’s a Litening targeting pod. Litening 5 pods started entering service in late 2021 with the Typhoon force.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  JamesD

Possibly the Litening 5 pod?

5 May 2021

“What we are doing now is getting the feedback from customer and operations teams on how to make that tasking simpler and really increase the cycle time on ops.

We’ve already got Litening 5 pods up in the air as an iteration and we are seeking feedback from 41 Squadron [the test and evaluation squadron], ” he said.

The plan is to get the enhanced capability “out to the front line by the end of next year,” said Flynn.”
https://www.businessinsider.com/british-air-force-sensor-upgrades-typhoon-fighter-jets-2019-8?r=US&IR=T

JamesD
JamesD
6 months ago

The typhoon not B- 52

Dragonwight
Dragonwight
6 months ago
Reply to  JamesD

Three is the laser designator pod. Two is the additional fuel tank, I believe. I might be incorrect mind.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

I wonder when we can expect to see the Irish Airforce doing the same thing? It will be good to see them carrying out air to air combat operations for themselves Apologies in advance if I’ve spelt air incorrectly, I thought this was never going to be a consideration according to one person on UKDJ 😂 Irish commission recommends fighter procurement10 FEBRUARY 2022 “Ireland’s Commission on the Defence Forces has recommended that the country field a modern combat aircraft type as part of a wider raft of proposed military procurement suggestions. In its report published on 9 February, the commission… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
David Flandry
David Flandry
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

The budget would exceed the entire budget for the Irish “air force”.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  David Flandry

Time will tell, of course, I wonder in light of the current situation re Russian activity if they intend to increase their budget further or prioritise the airforce?

The ongoing Air Corps Aircraft Renewal and Replacement Programme which includes the purchase of the C295 Maritime Patrol Aircraft

https://www.gov.ie/en/press-release/74389-press-release-budget-2022/

Sean
Sean
6 months ago
Reply to  David Flandry

It would probably exceed the entire Irish Defence Budget…

I suspect they’re hoping if they wait a decade or so they can avoid the expense of training and paying pilots and simply buy some drones.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It will be in at least 10 years time. Infrastructure, training, procurement etc. don’t happen overnight. That recommendation for fast jets was more of a longer term ambition. In the short to medium term it will be more helicopters, transport aircraft, cyber defence, more naval vessels and better pay and conditions.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

Looks like 3/4 years for training and no more than that for any additional Infrastructure as they already have an airfield at Casement Aerodrome.

Procurement? it all depends on what they choose to buy/lease or are gifted.

https://www.raf.mod.uk/recruitment/roles/roles-finder/aircrew/pilot

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Nope. Your figures are plucked from thin air. The fast jet recommendation is a longer term ambition. Just because an airfield is in Baldonnell doesn’t mean it can suddenly operate fast jets. There is a wealth of infrastructure and training that will need to be carried out. These things move slowly. Look at the regeneration of F35 carrier operations. It’s taken years and this is in a country with plenty of fast jet and naval aviation experience.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

Nope, the RAF recruitment program and if we trained them and gifted them a squadron of T1s by 2026/7 they would be able to defend themselves.

Do you honestly think it will take ten years to modify the airfield to accommodate them?

https://www.raf.mod.uk/recruitment/roles/roles-finder/aircrew/pilot

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Go and read that report again. In full. Don’t cherrypick headlines. Even if every option in that defence commission report is implemented, the fast jet purchase will be the very last consideration. Yes, being realistic it will take 10 years. Maybe more. Ireland has zero experience of fast jet operations. Casement Aerodrome is small, there will need to be modern HAS, fuel and ammunition stores, advanced radar, groundcrew training, everything that is needed for fighter jet operation will have to be built from near scratch. Perhaps probably a runway extension as well. Why on earth would the Irish Air Corps… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

So, 10 years plus to implement “HAS, fuel and ammunition stores, advanced radar, groundcrew training, and a runway extension?

“Just running assessments will take about one or two months before construction can begin. Then, depending on the length of the runway, you’d be looking in the ballpark of about one quarter to half the year based on construction experience as well as what material the runway will be AND weather.”

https://www.iata.org/en/training/subject-areas/ground-operations-courses/

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Yes. 10 years. Maybe more. That’s not including the procurement process, political infighting, tendering etc. Whether you like it or not, that’s the reality. Deal with it.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

In your opinion, not mine. Produce the facts to back up your claims, I have. If you don’t like it deal with it.

Shaikh Isa Air Base • Recently improved with $45 million in U.S. funding. Hosts F-16s, F/A-18s, and P-3 aircraft.7 • 12,467 ft runway.

https://www.americansecurityproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Ref-0213-US-Military-Bases-and-Facilities-Middle-East.pdf

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

You have provided no facts, just opinions, suppositions, inaccuracies and figures from idle air.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

Any facts to back up your claims yet? Didn’t think so! From scratch and 4years to train pilots. Deal with it. London City Airport Timeline 1981 – Proposal for the construction of London City Airport is made on the basis of providing an airport for the London Docklands Area 1985 – Planning permission granted for London City Airport by the Secretary of State for Transport 1986 – Foundation stone for the terminal building laid by Prince Charles the Prince of Wales 1987 – First aircraft lands at London City Airport and commercial services begin operating in October https://www.airparks.co.uk/london-city-airport/london-city-airport-history.html As posted… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Like i say.You don’t cope well with people disagreeing with you. The fact you have compared the construction timeline of a small civilian airport from the 80s to setting up a front line military Typhoon fast jet base is not comparable. It took 2 years to upgrade RAF Coningsbys infrastructure to accept Typhoon from Tornado F3. An already well established fast jet station.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Completely irrelevant. That’s a civilian infrastructure project from many years ago in a different country. Stay off Google and stop posting irrelevant links. They are not the same as facts Refresh your memory. You began this thread with a comment about how long it would be until the Irish could meet B52’s and similar. You got your answer. 10 years plus. Watch and see if you think you know better. Also, you included an oblique snide remark about the spelling of air , no doubt referencing the spelling of Eire. Have a bit more respect for the language of other… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

Clutching at straws now are we? Any facts yet to substantiate your claim of ten years? Thought not!

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Grow up son. Posting irrelevant links from Google is not establishing fact. You need to learn the difference. You asked and you got your answer. If you don’t like it, contact the Irish department of defence. Or switch off your computer and live in the real world.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Nigel. There’s experience and there’s Google links . I know which I trust.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

So do I, the RAF and common sense.

If it takes just over a year to build London City airport from scratch and have all the infrastructure and staff in place to land aircraft where do you get 10+ years from?

https://www.raf.mod.uk/recruitment/media/4216/20210528-raf-pilot.pdf

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

You ever worked or served on a RAF station Nigel?

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

From what you posted it didn’t take a year. It took 6. Even that’s not comparable, that’s a civil engineering project. Military engineering is a in a greater order of complexity.

Look Nigel, no offence but you clearly don’t understand the complexities of modern procurement, political realities, funding, training etc that will have to be managed should the Irish defence force decide to equip themselves with fast jets. Continually posting irrelevant Google links and photoshops and confusing them as facts makes you seem about twelve years old.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago

So not ten plus years then and that was an example of a completely new City Airport not modifying one to accept fast jets. The work will start later this summer and is expected to take around two years. It will involve the refurbishment of an existing hangar and construction of new technical and storage facilities. It forms part of a wider redevelopment of RAF Lossiemouth which also includes a refurbished runway, facilities for the RAF’s fleet of Poseidon MRA Mk. 1 sub-hunters, new and improved accommodation, and much more. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/20-million-contract-awarded-for-typhoon-infrastructure-at-raf-lossiemouth And yes I do understand the complexities of modern procurement, political realities,… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

You have not demonstrated or shown a single fact yourself that can demonstrate how a modern 4/5 generation fighter jet with all the attendant infrastructure, training, and support etc can be purchased and operated by a country’s Air force that has never operated fast jets before and in such a compressed time frame. That’s my opinion based on experience and knowledge, not some irrelevant link to civilian Air traffic control or a civil engineering project from the last century. I don’t need or have to justify or provide proof to anyone. You really don’t know what you are talking about… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Lossiemouth was already a fast jet station. The Irish don’t have, and never have had a fast jet station or ever operated fast jet’s. To go from the Irish government deciding they want to operate military fast jets and suddenly find the huge amount of cash to do so, and convince the Irish tax paying public it’s a good way to spend their hard earned cash before loosing the next election, is going to take a lot longer than 2 years. a lot longer. They haven’t got the cash or experience to operate a couple of T1 Hawks, let alone… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Aldegrove?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Think that was helicopters only. know idea what state it’s in today. Think the RAF moved out a good few years ago.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

I just had a look. It’s still a British Army unit with an RAF reserve unit. The big one, though, is that It’s in Northern Ireland, so nothing really to do with the government of the Irish Republic.

Paul.P
Paul.P
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Just a thought. It might be a quick start solution and facilitate shared costs if the politics work. The location in NI might work for both countries.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

I can’t see that happening, but you never know; stranger things have happened.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Maybe you should read my post again Nigel. 2 years to upgrade an already long established fast jet station to accept Typhoon infrastructure from Tornado F3. Very big difference from what you are pointlessly arguing about starting from scratch with a small aerodrome in Eire.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

A link for a civilian airport operations course?? Really Nigel, give Google a rest lad. I know you don’t cope well with people disagreeing with you, but that’s clutching at straws.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It takes at least 5 years to get a baby RAF pilot from officer training at Cranwell to joining a OCU, and that’s with all the current long in use infrastructure at Cranwell, Valley, Shawbury (Helicopters) plus engineering training at Cosford. Your assumption is way off.

Steve M
Steve M
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

If all they want is air defence then lend lease the Typhoon T1 they would not need more than current AIM-120 / Assram

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

I suggested gifting them some of the T1s in the past two weeks but the idea was shot down!

images.jpeg
geoff
geoff
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Exactly Nigel.The quickest, easiest,most sensible way for the ROI to acquire fast jets is to institute a co-operation agreement with the UK whereby a small number of T1’s in Irish livery are jointly operated on a financial contribution basis. Irishmen serve in, amongst other units, the Irish Guards so what would be the problem with a solution that can be implemented almost immediately?

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  geoff

I’m sure old Joe would be more than happy to help out as well.

If the US and UK supplied the aircraft, weapons fit and training the cost would be manageable.

Casement Aerodrome looks to be well-positioned too.

“Casement Aerodrome or Baldonnel Aerodrome is a military airbase to the southwest of Dublin, Ireland situated off the N7 main road route to the south and south west.”

https://www.raf.mod.uk/recruitment/roles/roles-finder/aircrew/pilot

EIREF161.jpg
Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Steve M
Steve M
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Trouble might be runways are less than half the length of CON or LOS? which is fine for c-295’s but not fast jets with extra fuel tanks

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

Possible room for extending the runways? or the use of another airport to accommodate them?

30Rxf6wG.jpg
Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Pete
Pete
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

Why would they need to lease something they already own!. Unlike MoD, they may also value maritime strike capability 18 tranche 2 Typhoons and leave the F35s behind would suit their needs May have to contribute to the lease deal for A2A refuelling to support QRA.

Steve M
Steve M
6 months ago
Reply to  Pete

Since when does the Irish Gov own Typhoons? So as i said we could lend/lease to them 🙂 their C-295 can be refitted to MPA/Persuader which has ability to do ASW & ASuW for the limited requirement that they would want/need. with T1’s providing top cover. The c-295 has loads of different variants which would reduce costs as only 2 fixed wing a/c types

Pete
Pete
6 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

The root of the thread was the concept of Scotland only affording protests and offering to support Ireland with those provests. Well aware Ireland doest own Typhoons..

Mark
Mark
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I must remember to scroll down through all messages before commenting…..
In other news looks like alot more assests are being moved. F15s have been pushed up from Lakenheath to Poland to bolster air defense.

Last edited 6 months ago by Mark
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Mark

It’s not looking good at the moment that’s for sure.

And Russia doesn’t want NATO forces close to its borders whilst creating it in the first place by threatening to invade Ukraine?

What does Putin honestly think is going to happen if he does?

US President Joe Biden has called on all American citizens remaining in Ukraine to leave the country immediately, citing increased threats of Russian military action.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-60342814

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
Barry Larking
Barry Larking
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Like the Scottish Nationalists, these proponents of an Irish Air Force are seemingly oblivious of all that would be required. The figures mentioned are ludicrously lower than are credible. Aircraft are simply the media cum public visible costs. Infrastructure – airfields, 4C, personnel and training costs? This expenditure to achieve what precisely? Something the Irish presently get free of charge. If taking charity from the hated British offends Irish amour propre, a request to any other air force capable of providing air security would present the Dail with a hefty bill.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

I think I’ve answered most of the points that you’ve raised above.

It would be in our interests as well to have them stationed on the western approaches for QRA’s. We will be losing the T1s anyway, why not make good use of them?

We seem to be undertaking joint projects at the moment, this would be another one.

“The UK and Ireland will not bid to stage the 2030 World Cup and will focus on a bid for Euro 2028 instead. The third largest sports event in the world.”

Last edited 6 months ago by Nigel Collins
George Parker
George Parker
5 months ago

Hmmmm. I hope sleepy Joe is not contemplating using those lumbering beast over Ukraine. Senile old fool.