The US Navy has commissioned the USS Delaware into the fleet, the 18th Virginia-class attack submarine.

Although the traditional public commissioning ceremony was canceled for public health safety and due to restrictions on large public gatherings, the Navy commissioned USS Delaware administratively and transitioned the ship to normal operations.

“This Virginia-class fast-attack submarine will continue the proud naval legacy of the state of Delaware and the ships that have borne her name,” said Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly.

“I am confident that the crew of this cutting edge platform will carry on this tradition, confronting the many challenges of today’s complex world with the professionalism and agility the American people depend on from the warriors of the silent service.”

Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, said in a release:

“The U.S. Navy values the support of all those who contributed to today’s momentous milestone and will look for a future opportunity to commemorate this special event,” Caudle said.

“The sailors of USS Delaware hail from every corner of the nation and from every walk of life. This crew, and the crews who follow, will rise to every challenge with unmatched bravery and perseverance to ensure the U.S. Submarine Force remains the best in the world.”

The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without refuelling.

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Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 months ago

Love the photo with the Dolphin. Majestic creature.

David Flandry
David Flandry
5 months ago

Indeed. Looks as if its outrunning the submarine.

DaveyB
DaveyB
5 months ago
Reply to  David Flandry

Bottlenosed dolphins are known to normally swim around (cruise) 10mph. However, when chasing prey they can reach 25mph or over in short sprints. Riding a wave or a wake, a dolphin can go almost twice as fast, using the same energy cost.