British weapon supply flights, the first taking off before the invasion started, continue day and night to supply Ukraine with weapons with which to defend itself against invading Russian forces.

The supply flights started before the invasion and have not stopped since. However, they now land in Poland near the Ukrainian border.

The UK recently announced that it would supply “scores of artillery guns, hundreds of drones” plus 50,000 rounds and more anti-tank weapons to Ukraine in the coming weeks.

“The delivery of the new equipment will significantly step up the UK’s support as the country fights to repel Russia’s brutal and unjustified invasion.”

More than 20 M109 155mm self-propelled guns and 36 L119 105mm artillery guns will soon arrive from the UK, Defence Secretary Ben Wallace announced in an update to Parliament today. Counter-battery radar systems and more than 50,000 rounds of ammunition for Ukraine’s existing Soviet-era artillery will also follow, he added.

UK sending ‘scores’ of artillery guns and drones to Ukraine

“This equipment will bolster the Armed Forces of Ukraine’s ability to defend itself against Russia’s indiscriminate use of artillery. The UK will also send more than 1,600 more anti-tank weapons in the coming weeks, along with drones, including hundreds of loitering aerial munitions.”

So far 6,900 NLAW, Javelin, Brimstone and other anti-tank weapons, as well as 16,000 artillery rounds, six Stormer vehicles fitted with Starstreak anti-air missile launchers and hundreds of missiles have been sent to Ukraine.

The UK has also supplied maritime Brimstone missiles, multiple launch rocket systems, 120 armoured fighting vehicles and large quantities of non-lethal aid including more than 82,000 helmets, 8,450 sets of body armour and over 5,000 night vision devices, say the MoD.

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“The scale and range of equipment we are providing demonstrates the strength of our resolve. Together with our international partners, we will ensure Ukraine has the tools to defend their country from Putin’s illegal invasion.”

It comes after the UK launched a major training operation for Ukrainian forces, with the potential to train up to 10,000 soldiers.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Mark B
Mark B
9 days ago

Good. In the fullness of time it would be good to see Ukraine push the Russians back to Russia where they belong. Helping them do that and thus ensure aggression is not rewarded is in everyone’s interests.

Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Mark B

100% 👍🏻✌🏻

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
9 days ago
Reply to  Mark B

It is absolute crucial Mark. This aggression must not succeed.

John Clark
John Clark
9 days ago
Reply to  Mark B

I would love to see it too, I doubt it will happen unfortunately, unless Putin’s regime falls…

Best we can hope for is a negotiated settlement with Russia pulling back to the ‘People’s Republic of Donbass’.

The Russian majority in that area have their “freedom” … Good luck with that, everything smashed to bits and a bankrupt Russia to rebuild it for you!

MarcAC
MarcAC
6 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

It’s not the peoples Republic of Donbass it’s a part of Ukraine and always will be, Ukraine should concentrate on taking back the south including the Crimea for now.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
9 days ago

It is good to see the country that went in first with vital hardware has the staying power. Watch how the post-war settlement when it comes screws us over in favour of ‘Europe’.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Maybe. The Ukrainians know which side their bread is buttered on, in terms of defence. UK stepped up and US followed up with the other Baltics. France and Germany proved totally useless as they were more interested in their economic interests. If we wanted to do a big trading and arms push with the Baltics this was probably the best way we could do it. Our missile sales are going to be through the roof. The only problem is that for some odd reason Ukraine sees the EU as part of its security. Which it isn’t: hopefully that view point… Read more »

p_thomas
p_thomas
9 days ago

Was in lviv and Kyiv last year, it’s exactly that they see their future as been part of the EU, for freedom to move about, €€, improving life etc, I did explain that it’s not that simple as they would soon have a war with Russia to sort out first.(they knew it was coming long ago) weirdly Britain’s name was in conversations as country that would help defend them as well as usa and Poland. No mention at all of eu/nations about that. As for other thing? Yep eu/france-germany will be rewarded purely for been part of eu, not a… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

Careful what you wish for.

€€ killed the Med economies. You just end up with higher wages and more expensive goods with no mechanism to allow for a less efficient economy. All their good workers will disappear to Germany, Poland or the EU Baltics to make money to send back home. That isn’t a win as it will cause crippling wage inflation.

Germany and France will depend on the ‘you are now with our club’ argument!

p_thomas
p_thomas
9 days ago

Exactly my point to them.. listening to them in bars, couple social clubs, they are lovely people , most are very poor even though city’s look ££ in some areas. Nothing wrong with trying to get a better life, they can mostly move around eu at moment but I can’t see a country like Ukraine been tied right to the EU. They haven’t been free that long of Russia, this war will push them far westwards towards EU. It’s a country worth defending, unfortunately they thought we’d come flying over borders with the yanks and poles. Sadly not and that… Read more »

simon alexander
simon alexander
8 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

EU is attractive to ex soviet bloc countries, they want help to reduce their corruption and establish law , policing, civil rights, independent press, they want the western lifestyle.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago

The downside was that much of their population that could moved west, intent on getting that lifestyle as soon as they could, not waiting for it at home. Thus leaving the Baltic states in particular with unbalanced populations. A large proportion of the emigrants coming here as we, unlike most of the EU, didn’t impose a time limit before they could move. Hence the invasion of Polish builders etc.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yaaaaaawn give your shite a break and how about condemnation of Putins illegal invasion of Ukraine. You’ve been pushing pro Russian shite since 2015 and all your USSR drooling vomit is on line for all to see. Sad sad wanker.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

More like Putin’s grey zone tactics at play, he knew people would move to safe zones- putting pressure on those nations nearest and potentially causing local unrest. But like the rest of the invasion it hasn’t gone very well has it, Europe for the most part has rallied together and NATO has never looked stronger.

Joe16
Joe16
8 days ago

To be fair, Poland, the Czech Republic and other central/eastern European countries have actually made their membership work financially. The last article on here about Poland’s new defence spending spree did state how much their economy has grown in the last 20 odd years (i.e. since they joined the EU in the early 2000s). To just simply say that they’ll end up as the new Greece doesn’t take into account the positive outcomes of the Baltics and other countries. Greece joined 20 years before Poland and the Czech Republic, but it’s those countries that have done far better considering how… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

It is those countries that are close to Germany that have done best as the Germans in particular moved significant industry into what was low (to the Germans) cost areas used to light and heavy engineering. This included VW moving cable looms into Ukraine, outside the EU for now but a cost saving that couldn’t be ignored, a decision they now bitterly regret. The Germans used eastern Europe in much the same way as the US/UK used China to offshore for profit, sod their local workforce.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Any condemnation of putins illegal invasion of Ukraine yet saddo?

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

I know I am among many who are excitedly waiting JohninMagnetogorsk’s reply …

Steve
Steve
8 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Its only really Greece that had serious troubles and their EU membership saved them from a lot of pain. The other nations have generally done well, if you looked at GDP per capita and most EU countries are in a pretty good spot.

National debt is high in southern European countries but so is ours and the US.

Douglas Newell
Douglas Newell
7 days ago
Reply to  Steve

err… Spain and Italy have both been hammered by membership of the Euro. Massive levels of sovereign debt, High prices, and high unemployment rates aren’t fun.

All helped by the low Euro interest rates that are perfect for the German and Dutch economies.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago

I know plenty if Ukrainians already here in the U.K., and they’re all doing professional jobs.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Exactly my point.

They are good workers!

Joe16
Joe16
9 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

It’s interesting that Ukraine see the EU as it was originally intended to be- an economic alliance, rather than what the Euro Federalists want it to be- some kind of overarching everything alliance (including security).
I was pro-EU, but I never saw it as a security or legal solution- it should always have stuck with the economic side.

p_thomas
p_thomas
8 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

They see it as a hand to help them out of an economic hole and been tied to Russia. (Before Feb) We are looked on as supportive of them in a different way, they trust us individually and didn’t hear too many positive points about Germany, France, Spain, Italy also they like Boris a lot ha ha.. a great country that deserves helping to the maximum

Joe16
Joe16
8 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

Absolutely, one thing (among others) that we can be proud of in terms of our foreign policy work since 2014 and before. It’s the long term support- not just when it hit the big news.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

A huge reason for any Eastern European country joining the EU is to get grants for rebuilding/ reconstruction/ redevelopment. The huge amount the U.K. paid annually to be in the EU was roughy equivalent to the amount the EU gave to Poland every year. If Ukraine joins the EU there’s going to be a huge amount of money going there every year for decades to come, and Germany and France will be the two biggest countries stung. But even countries like Eire may find themselves giving more to the EU than they get back in grants – that will be… Read more »

The artist formerly known as John Clark
The artist formerly known as John Clark
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

It certainly will, quite the shock to the system!

OldSchool
OldSchool
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

If the EU thinks that’s bad wait until SNPLand joins them – 300Bn in debt and no viable currency 😂.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

(a) Assuming they’re allowed a referendum – not happening
(b) Assuming the Scottish Nazis win a referendum – not happening
(c) Assuming the Scottish economy survives the years of waiting to join the EU while Scotland is excluded from its biggest export market, the United Kingdom – it won’t

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
8 days ago
Reply to  p_thomas

Speculated that Poland went South Korea route for IFVs, fires and the rest as the prospect of coming to the fore as a major European buttress, whilst Germany sat back and sold them the hardware, would have proved somewhat unpalatable.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
9 days ago

With the Baltic and the Scandinavian states as part of the UK led Expeditionary Force along with the Netherlands; Poland and the Ukraine seen as essentially pro British; Italy tied into Tempest and more and lovely Portugal who have been allies for 600 years who does that leave for the super duper European force who can be relied on? Ah, thereby hangs a tail.

David Steeper
David Steeper
9 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Netherlands Navy/Marines work very closely with RN/RM but their Army/Airforce are tied into German counterparts. Overall it’s Germany not the UK they work with. On Portugal the days when they were an ally are long gone.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
8 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

No argument with that David. The RNN and RNMC have been together since WW2 so that makes that set up pretty solid. As for Portugal they looked pretty happy when they signed up for a new bilateral agreement a few weeks ago. Anyway, I like Portugal😎

David Steeper
David Steeper
8 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Portugal hah can’t beat Filey ! 😁

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
8 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Can’t argue with that either, my good lady and I were in Yorkshire only last September. It does seem along time ago now.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
6 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Difference is the % of operational kit in Netherlands is far higher than in Germany.

Germany needs to spend a lot of money just to get what it has working and have warstocks.

Bean
Bean
6 days ago

TFEU Art 42.7

Joe16
Joe16
9 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

To be fair, what exactly do we produce that Ukraine would want in terms of military equipment? Brimstone, CAMM, some light patrol-type vessels. Maybe Typhoon, if they could afford them. Everything else that we’ve supplied them, we’ve bought from elsewhere. Can’t blame Ukraine for going for Leopard 2, when we don’t have enough CH2 in service and no production line. Can’t blame Ukraine for going with Krab/PZ2000/Ceasar/Archer when we’re looking for an AS90 replacement from Korea. Can’t blame Ukraine for picking Puma/CV90 when Warrior is too old and Ajax is too compromised. They aren’t screwing us over, UK government policy… Read more »

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

That is very detailed but that was not the point I sought to make. When Putin is sent packing, the E.U. will elbow the U.K. aside.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
8 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Thats going to be the truth. We support Ukraine at huge expense then we will get locked out of any lucrative trade and rebuilding deals by our ‘”friends and allies” in the EU.
You can see it coming from a million miles away.

nestor mahkno
nestor mahkno
8 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

UK chose to leave the EU, are you saying it was the wrong decision?

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  nestor mahkno

Not sure if he is saying that but he isn’t completely wrong about the EU will do its best to tie EU membership to giving the majority of contracts to EU based companies, it’s not really rocket science is it. We have just seen the sale of OneWeb to a French Company with half its value because OneWeb will be locked out of any sensitive EU business unless it becomes a subsidiary of an EU company. This is despite UK Govt gaining relative control of it to get around being locked out of European GPS efforts. French must be laughing… Read more »

Coll
Coll
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

The Wikipedia entry “The merger of OneWeb and Eutelsat was announced on 26 July 2022. Eutelsat and OneWeb shareholders would each hold 50% of the new Eutelsat shares. The transaction valued OneWeb at $3.4bn. Eutelsat would continue to be listed in Paris and apply to list on the London Stock Exchange.”

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

You understood my point exactly. When Ukraine wins – Putin has already lost – the E.U. will jump to the head of the queue to undertaken the reconstruction of the country.

OldSchool
OldSchool
8 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Unfortunately I agree. UK must not give to Ukraine reconstruction. Let the EU pay for it all – lets see how that goes shall we.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
7 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

I mean it’s obvious. We left the EU club. Ukraine wants in the club. So it’s in the EUs interest to use money they put forward to be spent within the EU.
U.K. can offer money and put in a contract that so much of it must be spent in U.K. etc. It’s then up to Ukraine to decide. Also if U.K. has the best services on offer it will win

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
7 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

With that I do find talking about money for reconstruction is a bit off. They haven’t won yet and it’s a big job to beat Russia back. If ukraine lose I doubt the U.K. will be helpful in reconstruction so let’s focus on getting the job done first

Last edited 7 days ago by Monkey spanker
David Waugh
David Waugh
9 days ago

Not sure it’s a totally good idea to make these arrangements public knowledge.

Ian Skinner
Ian Skinner
9 days ago

Good to see our flights no longer have to avoid German airspace.

Ron Stateside
Ron Stateside
9 days ago

“British aircraft continue to ship weapons to Ukraine.”

Late night George?

Richard Cooper
Richard Cooper
9 days ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

Airships.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
8 days ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

Par Avion

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

Considering it was reported by some military sources we barely have enough ammunition to last more than weeks in any large conflict I do wonder what they are carrying. After all we are hardly flowing in kit to fire it either. I suspect much of it has been acquired from other sources to supply Ukraine as a show of unity.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
8 days ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

I thought Americans used the word ‘ship’ to mean ‘transport’?

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Americans are so fluent in English they use words to mean anything.

TypewriterMonkey
TypewriterMonkey
9 days ago

Keep the support and weapons flowing. Putin is probably gambling now that the West will gradually begin to lose interest. I really hope this doesn’t happen.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago

I don’t think there is long to go before Russia starts to run out of the basics. Do they have the production capability to replace ammunition at the rate it is being expended / destroyed – NO. Do they have the ability to replace their high tech missiles with the school/hospital/civilian precision seeker technology – NO Can they make T72 tanks at the rate they are being blown up: NO I could go on and on: it just isn’t sustainable never mind the men to operate all the antique garbage or their moral as they realise antique tanks offer no… Read more »

Nick C
Nick C
9 days ago

Haven’t heard anything from that chap in Milton Keynes recently. Should we have?

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Nick C

Hi there.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Shucks, when Putin trawled the prisons for his latest mobilisation by stealth I’d hoped that had netted you…

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

I am far too far west and anyway a net would have to have a tiny mesh to net me and probably even the 77th only have a fleeting interest in me.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

77 Bde don’t do that kind of work.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Ah yes, I forgot you’re a traitor rather than a Russian stooge…

Here’s the thing, in the previous post you used the American “maneuver” rather than British “manoeuvre”. A ‘mistake’ I would especially not expect from someone who has previously claimed to serve.

So an American in MK? Well MK is as desolate as some one horse towns in the Midwest. But more likely a foreigner whose first language isn’t English, pretending to be a Brit, but learned American-English.

Such an obvious mistake Ivan.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Damn he’s a sleeper. Probably pre programmed with stats about Cathedrals dotted all around the Country. Just keep away from Canterbury it’s close to my heart.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Drive past a few times a year. Got friends in Deal.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Yeah he’s a ‘steeple spotter’… which is even sadder than being a ‘train-spotter!

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Where did I claim to serve? I didn’t and have never claimed to have done so.

My sometimes strange spelling is because I haven’t been able to work our how to get Firefox’s spell checker to spell the English way as opposed to American.

You obviously have never been to MK. ‘Fly’ over it sometime in Google maps and see if you can find any ‘desolate’ areas. I’m a few hundred yards from VW/Audi/SEAT/Skoda HQ with Scania and MB a bit further down the road. There are probably few better areas in the UK to bring up children and work.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You’ve been vomiting pro Russian bile since 2015, on other websites, and with very easy to verify and cut and paste Russian propaganda. Any condemnation of putins illegal invasion of Ukraine you nonce loving saddo.

TypewriterMonkey
TypewriterMonkey
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Intended or not, you do come across as some kind of East German ‘government worker’ whose career high point was ruined by the fall of the GDR, and you’ve been blaming NATO ever since.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago

You actually just described Putin!!! 😆

TypewriterMonkey
TypewriterMonkey
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

😂

John Hartley
John Hartley
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

I still think the MK is Moscow Kremlin.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

‘He’ is actually a team I conclude. ‘His’ resources, and, as you point out, variety of spellings and usage point to more than one individual. The messages are very occasionally toned down; but the direction is always and cynically pro-Kremlin bunker.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Yes I think you’re right. If it was the same person he wouldn’t be so amiable today after the the way I wound him up a couple of days ago for effectively being a war criminal by condoning Putin’s actions.

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago
Reply to  Sean

He makes quite a few, or should I say “they” make quite a few. The new one who is most amusing is currently A Moore, saddo who always seems to be on the same thread/posts and agenda as Johnskie.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Oh dear you still know sweet fa about the military from the country you claim to be from, saddo.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

How is Milton Keynes I nearly moved there for job at the Open University many, many years ago haven’t been back since.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Its a brilliant place to live, been here since 1976. The OU was one of the first organisations here and a big employer but given the growth in the place it is less important now. For a while I went out with a woman who worked on Foxhunter, the Marconi offices were next to ours.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I take it going out with a women, as a pro Russian illegal invasion supporting dick, means she didn’t reciprocate the date and she ended up r***d and dead in a ditch, while you stole her washing machine.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

It is I think indicative of Ivan’s duplicity that he feels obliged to write travelogue pieces to prove his credentials. I have met no one who is British who would ever bother to do that.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Agreed 😂👍

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

You have done more than anyone around here to point out this misinformation effort targeted at UKDJ. The re-published back catalogue was particularly damning seen as a whole. Great work.

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Thankyou very much mate lol but Farouk is the day to day ninja on handing him his arse!

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago

We better not otherwise we may as well offer up our necks for the attachment of. chains which will inevitably down the line destroy life as we know it in Europe and further afield indeed. Trouble is the average voter in Europe and certainly America doesn’t remotely understand the consequences of not supporting Ukraine. Relief in the short term if even that would occur would be replaced by disaster in but a few years if Putin and Xi are empowered in these moments. They would literally have us by the throat with the global South falling in line to do… Read more »

Caspian237
Caspian237
9 days ago

I see that Germany has sold 100 Pzh 2000 howitzers to Ukraine in a deal worth 1.7 billion Euros although the order will take several years to complete and it is not known when the first howitzer will be delivered. That’s nice of them.

Jacko
Jacko
8 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

Well we did have to buy the M109s off Belgium before they went to the Ukraine and as far as I know we gave them to Ukraine 😕

Caspian237
Caspian237
8 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Well, according the Brussels Times, Belgium refused to provide the same M109s to Ukraine because of,

the unreasonable price of the M109s set by the Flemish technology company OIP, who are charging “more than 10 times what they paid for it themselves”

If only there was some other idiot to purchase them and provide them to Ukraine instead. 

Jacko
Jacko
8 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

The point is the bloody Belgians COULD have given them anyway! But no they had to make a profit.

Caspian237
Caspian237
8 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Yes I agree. The Belgians could have purchased them from OIP and sent them on to Ukraine themselves. They chose not to because they did not want to spend the money that OIP was asking for them.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

Shows how committed to freedom and democracy the Belgians are, or rather, aren’t..

The artist formerly known as John Clark
The artist formerly known as John Clark
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Hmm, the epicenter of all things EU, not being committed to freedom and democracy, now that can’t be right Sean!

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

That’s their French side at work I’m afraid. To think we only entered the 1st WW to defend them because we said we would after the bloody Napoleonic War a century before. They really are a waste of space.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Many, many thousands lie in war graves in Belgium. How many are Belgians?

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

Yes as usual, style over substance, if only we were as good at making things as we are at pr bullshit aimed to hide the fact we don’t eh.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Geez even the Turks are giving them free Bayater drones so the money Polish people collected for them can go for humanitarian causes. So the most despised Country in Europe in Ukraine ( or is it France) is already making money out of them, yep bodes well for rebuilding I’m afraid. Mind you probably our fault for stop building much of the basics that they need while ‘pacifist’ Germany was happy to keep making them for the benefit of global Germany.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
8 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

Germany is a disgrace to sell weapons rather than to gift them. Ukraine has precious little cash as their economy has stalled.

Crabfat
Crabfat
5 days ago
Reply to  Caspian237

And where’s Ukraine going to get the money for 100 howitzers? German taking the opportunity to make money out of Putin’s invasion of Ukraine. Who’s next, the frogs?

Caspian237
Caspian237
4 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Germany should be grateful that we’re helping their new customer stave off the Russians with our free stuff, at least until the cheque clears at Deutsche Bank.

Last edited 4 days ago by Caspian237
Animal
Animal
9 days ago

Just popping in to say hello to all of you lovely folk on here……….. 👌

George Amery
George Amery
9 days ago

Hi folks hope all is well.
Quite right, the UK was the first to step up and meet the challenges of supply and training to Ukrainian military personnel. We must and need to continue with a dogged stance and not waiver!
As a side related issue. There’s some view with main stream media reported that Russia is going to equip hypotonic missiles to it’s warships. What do we know about this as fact or not as the media mostly is wrong regarding military issues.
Cheers
George

Paul.P
Paul.P
8 days ago
Reply to  George Amery

I think Ukraine will be flying F-16s over Sevastopol before the year is out, The Russian navy will be sunk at anchor before it can launch hypersonic missiles.

David Lloyd
David Lloyd
8 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Putin will threaten a tactical nuclear strike if it looks like the Americans will actually supply F-16 to the Ukraine. Even as Ukraine pilots are training on them stateside. I’m not sure they have actually told Biden – in case he craps out again. Or maybe he slept through the briefing

Paul.P
Paul.P
8 days ago
Reply to  David Lloyd

I think the US will supply a handful of early model F16 with a proviso that they not be used to strike targets in Russia; bit like they did with MLRS.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Would the long range missiles for HIMARS reach Sebastopol? Dems and Republicans seem keen to supply them only Biden seems understandably reluctant. But in all honesty I am more concerned with the Taiwan Pelosi risks presently than Russian threats.

Daniel
Daniel
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Yes the ATACMS has a 300km range, enough to hit targets anywhere in occupied Ukraine with the current front lines.

Daniel
Daniel
8 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

It also incidentally uses the same warhead as harpoon so would likely make a mess of the Black Sea Fleet in harbour.

farouk
farouk
8 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

The problem with ATACMS is they stopped producing them in 2007, so finite in numbers. Things will change for the betetr when the new Precision Strike Missile comes on line next year (British Army to field it in 2024)

Daniel
Daniel
8 days ago
Reply to  farouk

Very true, but I doubt Ukraine would need especially large numbers to have a disproportionate effect. Once the capability has been demonstrated, and if it is demonstrated semi regularly, then the Russians would have to take the existence of these weapons into account in all their planning.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  George Amery

The Russians say that the Zircon, a M9/10 anti ship missile, has now passed all tests which started last December and included one at maximum range, 1000km in May launched from a VLS cell of their latest frigate. They are now working on integrating it into their shore based anti ship system Bastion, replacing the Onyx missile. This is the latest press release, the previous release on the 18th July described ‘in service’ as being end 2022 but they appear to have brought it forward. MOSCOW, July 28. /tass/. The Zircon hypersonic missile for surface ships of the Russian Navy… Read more »

Armchair Admiral
Armchair Admiral
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Didn’t Steve Zodiac used to shoot down Zircon missiles from Fireball XL5 if I remember correctly?
AA

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago

We’d better get Fireball XL5 into service PDQ.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

What do you think this SAM missile is in the video? It’s soviet I think
https://youtu.be/gqCSKtJrlxA

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Apparently the Russians are so low on missiles, not only are they attacking land targets with anti-ship missiles, but they’ve now started using S300 SAMs to attack land-targets. I suspect it was one of these the Ukrainians blew out of the sky in that video.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Yes which shows that boasting about hypersonic missiles is one thing having them to use or indeed their use having any real impact on the conflict is marginal at best. Even the US couldn’t afford to use its coming hypersonics (3 recent successful tests of far more sophisticated weapons) at anything but limited high profile targets. If anything the reported use of several by Russia early in the conflict was more for pr and ‘testing’ in combat than any real strategic advantage like they did with Armata tank in Libya. Interesting to know if they performed any better mind.

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

I’m pretty sure the ones they’ve already used are simply repurposed ballistic missiles launched from aircraft, I doubt the accuracy isn’t that great – but that doesn’t seem to be a priority for the Russians so long as they hit something in the right country.
The American ones are far more sophisticated designs, as are the Chinese. With the Americans are way ahead on engine technology.

farouk
farouk
8 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

The sad thing here is I recognised it straight away, I need to get out more

Jon
Jon
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

And maybe we could get the Navy to use Supercar for the carriers. VTOL hovercraft FTW.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Modern smart missiles generally are rather difficult to shoot down I’m afraid as we have discovered in this war and previously with USS Stark, Naval supremacy is based on many interlocking factors that a faster missile even if it were available in numbers does little to nothing to chip away at. I guess some might appreciate a few more minutes to live, but that’s about it. I personally grew up with the 3 minute warning if it’s one or two minutes makes little difference in reality a serious shooting war amongst elite powers isn’t going to end well or much… Read more »

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yeah and the Armata tank is in full production filling Russian front-line tank regiments… 😆

The only certainly about what Putin says is that it’s full of lies, untruths, half-truths, and delusions. I wonder what other vengeance weapons Der Fuhrer is about to announce 😆

Last edited 8 days ago by Sean
JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

You mean like the release to operational use of the Poseidon torpedo?

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

No he already announced that in 2018…

and it’s only taken them 30 years to build a submarine capable of carrying them 🤣

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yeah that was a concept being played with going back to the 60s, only Russia seems to have decided it’s a good idea, the propulsion systems are interesting if equally ancient in concept mind, but I guess so we’re rockets. In the end though it’s just another ways of killing everyone on the planet, yes sounds all Dan Dare and scary and looks good to a technically naive public looking to be filled with Imperial grandeur, which requires new super wonder weapons to obscure the message from the realities, but we already know we can all die in a nuclear… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

I was replying to Sean’s comment re “vengeance weapons” as it seemed to fit the bill rather well.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Ha ha ha haaaaaaaaaaa

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Yes it does take quite some time to correct intrinsic problems when these weapons are put to the test even against third World opposition.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You are very well read about crappy Rusdian “wonder weapons” its all a load of hyperbole of course. If Russian weapons were any good they would have turned over 2nd rate Ukraine by now.
I dont believe any of it.
How’s the weather in Moscow Johnski? Maybe you dont know as youve been stuck in a basement of the kremlin for weeks with your handler having a gun to your head or offering you a nice cup of novichok tea unless you do exactly what he says…which is sprout forth some utter guff.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

But as with all Russian statements it can’t be trusted. Maybe they do have zircon maybe they don’t. Maybe it works, maybe it doesn’t. It’s not a game changer anyway.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Indeed it’s barely relevant all it and it’s comrades have done is soured the US to regenerate its own hypersonic weapons program that had been effectively mothballed that will make Russian ‘wonder weapons’ look like they are built from Lego bricks, rather like their wonder military aircraft have proved to be since they too were heralded as supreme fighting machines. Kalibr missiles are pretty good actually and I think in reality the Russians are discovering that 95% of the time they can do everything that it’s celebrated Kinzhal can at a fraction of the cost especially if you use more… Read more »

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yes I’m glad you stated frigate singular there.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yaaaaaaaaaaawn, more sad vomit and bile! The Zircon “missile” also does an economy wash and a 15 min spin cycle to reduce carbon emissions….

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  George Amery

Yes but they will capsize if they actually launch them. No as usual sounds great and yes the Admiral Whatsyoucallit frigate has them because it’s been test firing them but one wonders how many ships are modern enough to handle them or indeed they can afford to fit with them, let alone how many missiles they can actually produce needing no doubt Black Market supplies of components to do so. Hey their latest ‘modernising’ frigate programme has been cancelled due to building, cost and performance factors. And even then their surface fleet would be wiped out before they could launch… Read more »

Albion
Albion
8 days ago

I hope we are back-filling!

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Albion

Bring in the JCBs.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Just read an article from Indian Muslim perspective that JCB fa Tory in India is really an extension and expression of Empire and a tool of Modi who apparently is following the tune of test Empire using them to suppress and knock down Muslim district houses. You really can’t win can you, JCBs a weapon of suppression and British conspiracy enabling Modi’s evil intent by doing business with him, oh and all British Hindus are Fascists apparently pushing and financing this along from afar. Geez where does one start, Modi and his privileged elite, hates the British for heavens sake… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Why are the Russians invading is now? Don’t worry we have plenty of JCBs and tractors with farmers to defeat the rapists as they arrrive! You better keep your flag waving welcome low key until you know it’s safe to join in the rape and looting!

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Albion

Maybe buy some tractors 🚜 as the Ukrainians have shown they’re effective against Russian armour 😆

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
8 days ago

Article in the Ukrainian press that Ukrainian sailors were currently training on a British Minesweeper ahead of two being transferred. Presumably the two Sandown class that we agreed to donate as part of the naval arms sale just before the invasion.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
7 days ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

I wonder about these. They can’t be planning on taking them into the black sea soon, would they? Maybe a type 23/45 combo might last the trip to port but Ukraine navy ships are bound to be prime targets.
Fast patrol boats with torpedoes, anti ship missiles might be better. Used with knowledge of where Russian ships are.

Jacko
Jacko
6 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Cant get a warship past the Turks can they?

Peter germain
Peter germain
8 days ago

Im 63 and its the first time I feel proud to be British the government stood up when needed and stayed up.
It will be remembered in history that most countries stood against this Russian aggressor not only for ukrainian people but also to free the Russian people.
If this war turn out the way Europe wants. The kremlin is defeated. Think of what a difference it will make.
Thank you Boris for getting in there first.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago

Many here seem to be ignoring that this is not just a military conflict, it is economic as well and the longer it goes on the more the latter part moves in Russia’s favour. This is down to gas availability and its price. It seems highly likely that much of Europe (not enough gas), including us (very expensive gas), will be brought to its knees by Christmas, sooner if its a cold, windless or dry autumn. General Winter is always regarded as a key ally for Russia, this year, right on time his underling Colonel Summer is bringing his asset,… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Long post, same rhetoric and sad agenda shite with no balls to support and defend your support of an illegal invasion and a disgusting occupying pretend army who are the exact same as the nazis! And your description is Russia in 2022 same as UK in the 70s! At least you are not scared to describe Russia at this time, well done.

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

If you are not taking steps to protect your budget from what is coming to your gas/electricity bills more fool you.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Ha ha ha haaaaaa

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

One of your thoughtful replies yet again.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You answer to throw away comments but not to the questions! Just an old, civvy, troll traitor coward who supports rape and murder! How very sad, you may need some friends to pop over from your J Saville supporters club for a chat and a touch up!

Jon
Jon
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I loved the patterns the ice made on the windows in winter until double glazing put an end to it. Central heating through heat exchangers is the way things are moving, not 2KW fan heaters. Shared bathwater has only been a thing in my lifetime due to drought (and fun). I suppose we could see a shift to showers, but that will be climate change not Russian driven. If you want a fairly old fogey’s memories, I’ll refer you to 1973 when the price of crude oil went through the roof due to OPEC and the Arab-Israeli conflict. It went… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
8 days ago
Reply to  Jon

I agree with your air and ground source heat exchangers comment but they are expensive and I long term solution. A £15 2kw fan heater and electric blankets are short term for the coming winter and are likely to be hard to find when we get to winter.

Its gas and electricity prices, not crude based petrol and diesel that worry me for this winter, the bills will be big.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yaaaaaaawn

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
7 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

We will adapt. U.K. is fine. Europes gas tanks are being filled now. Germanys LNG terminal is progressing very fast. It maybe tough but it’s worth it. End of 2022 Germany will have its 4 floating terminals running.
Russia has shot itself in the foot. Once Europe is off the Russian energy it won’t go back.
All of Europe’s LNG ports have been under used so spare capacity was there and being used.
Prices will drop as they always do after a spike.

JohninMK
JohninMK
7 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

I hope you are correct, we should hopefully get supplies bu my concern is what price the UK will be paying for its gas over the next 9 months and how much of those supplies, given our well established LNG terminals and electricity interlink cables we onward ship to help the rest of Europe..

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
6 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yes it may be difficult for a little bit but I don’t think it’s will break the will of Europe to give in and give russia a free run at any location previously under the Soviet Union.
I do think Europe should of been moving faster with making moving energy easier. Gas trucks/trains, getting power stations ready, laying cables/pipes, renewables etc. 2023 will be better.

Paul.P
Paul.P
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

OMG….how will I survive without central heating and a fortnight in Spain….what a load of tosh…my parents managed and so will I. The West could use a bit of toughening up. Do us no harm at all to get back to basics…..hard work, teamwork, respect will all increase. Think Lioness solidarity not Tory individualism.

WSM
WSM
8 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I could swear I heard the music from the “Hovis” commercial playing in the background as I read that

ChrisLondon
ChrisLondon
7 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I think the economic side of this conflict will favour the democratic forces in the medium to long run, not the fascist imperialists, even if there is some short term pain. The 70% of the Russian economy that is not fossil fuel dependant contracted 15% after sanctions and will probably drop another 10%+ over the next year. This is being temporarily covered up by the rise in fossil fuel prices caused by uncertainty over supplies and the wishes of many to move away from Russia as a supplier for security reasons. The costs of fixed infrastructure mean a relative minor… Read more »

John Hartley
John Hartley
8 days ago

Perhaps it is time for the UK to start domestic production of explosives & propellants again?

John Tait
John Tait
5 days ago

Well done Ben Wallace, and well done RAF on timely deliveries.
Russian aggression and brutality must not succeed.
Low marks to Germany for their procrastination and glacial action.