Royal Marines have carried out raids on beaches in North Queensland as part of an exercise.

According to a news release from the Royal Navy, Bravo Company of 40 Commando landed from helicopter carrier HMAS Canberra – flagship of the Royal Australian Navy – alongside troops of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, in the Cowley Beach Training Area.

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“The commandos attached to the Australian light amphibious infantry to form a ‘pre-landing force’ designed to secure beaches and beachheads to clear the way for larger amphibious forces to land ashore.

The green berets and A Company of the 2nd Battalion carried out patrols before Chinooks and landing craft brought in waves of troops, armoured vehicles and artillery to shore for the main thrust inland, all with Australian Tiger attack helicopters in support overhead.

It marks the commandos’ return to Australia’s eastern coast to continue their work started in 2019, when they also attached to the 2nd Battalion.”

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Talisman Sabre has been scaled back this year because of Covid-19 guidelines, with a maximum of 2,000 troops from outside Australia taking part in the exercises around the Shoalwater Bay Training Area and Townsville – around 150 miles south of where the marines have been training so far.

You can read more here.

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JJ Smallpiece
JJ Smallpiece
18 days ago

did they set the BBQ up on the beach?

Oscar Zulu
Oscar Zulu
17 days ago
Reply to  JJ Smallpiece

No. But they did bring a few Abrams MBTs ashore to join the party.

http://images.defence.gov.au/20210611adf8443968_189.jpg

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
14 days ago
Reply to  Oscar Zulu

Why did the Aussies buy Abrams? Such a heavy, gas guzzler – and where is the tank threat coming from?

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

China called them chewing gum on the boot of China a while back Indonesia is spreading its love as well

Oscar Zulu
Oscar Zulu
13 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Heavy? An M1A1 is sightly lighter (63 tonnes) than a Challenger 2 without add-on armour (64 tonnes without add-on armour or 75 tonnes with additional armour). Gas guzzler? Yes, the Challenger 2 has a longer range but it trades fuel economy for speed with the M1A1 outpacing the UK MBT both on and off road. Interoperability with the US, Australia’s primary security ally, makes the Abrams the logical choice for the ADF. The M1A1s benefits of a shared logistics train for spares and ammunition, training, TTPs etc cannot be provided by any European platform. Challenger 2 is an orphan platform… Read more »

Jacko
Jacko
18 days ago

Reading about all these deployments the boys and girls are really getting out and about aren’t they?

Oscar Zulu
Oscar Zulu
17 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

If they are lucky they might get an early introduction to the Boxer.

The first of the ADF’s CRV Boxers have been delivered with training and amphioxus landings working up TTPs,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ywuGa0r75k

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFU1y4hlVXM

Nic
Nic
17 days ago

I take it when they deploy on an exercise like this , they take all equipment with them including firearms etc . Does the RAF fly them out or do they charter a civilian aircraft.

Oscar Zulu
Oscar Zulu
17 days ago
Reply to  Nic

The RMs were issued with the latest Australian EF88 Steyr rifles for the exercise.

It would be interesting to hear how they compared with UK SA80s given they are both bullpup designs,

http://images.defence.gov.au/20210611adf8443968_672.jpg

Nic
Nic
17 days ago
Reply to  Oscar Zulu

It would be interesting to know how they found the street rifles , do the RMs not use another rifle as standard issue as well as the SA80.

Andy a
Andy a
17 days ago
Reply to  Nic

Meant to be getting the newer colt Canadian model

dan
dan
17 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

The Aussies use a lot of US kit so I wonder if they will adopt the 6.8mm rifles the Americans choose?

David Steeper
David Steeper
17 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

I think they only use the Colt for boarding duties. When ashore they use SA80.

Andy a
Andy a
17 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

No the whole RM are supposed to be getting c7 as part of the rebrand, new uniform too

David Steeper
David Steeper
15 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

Your spot on.

Andy a
Andy a
15 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Not sure when actually happening mind, Navy seems to be splashing the cash at last

David Steeper
David Steeper
15 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

Umm have to say out of all the things the Navy could be spending their money on it wouldn’t be my priority. Sceptical about whether it’s even a superior weapon in either effective range or accuracy to the SA80.

Andy a
Andy a
15 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Well it’s rubbish for 8% left handed. It’s bad for close quarters and boarding as u can’t swap shoulders to go round off hand corners. I think because of terror wars a lot have been hammered and this is way of making them last few years by replacing say 8000 of them. I like a bull pup but every country that used them except Australia is moving away from them.

Tim
Tim
13 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

I’m left handed served in the infantry and had no problem if you need to transfer shoulders u use the EBS sight on the top this was solved a decade ago and bullpup rifles have never been so popular the tavor is used by loads of country’s the excuse to use the c7 (which isn’t a better rifle by any measure) was made because apparently they use frangable ammunition on ship boarding duties and there was a chance it wouldn’t cycle as reliable also one of the new 6.8mm rifles in trials with the USA is bulpup

Andy a
Andy a
13 days ago
Reply to  Tim

I know it is, I own a bull pup however it’s a fact that usa pulls most weight in small arms choice in nato and most of their military have very poor view of them rightly or wrongly. The only issue I found is they tend to have poor triggers mechanisms. New Zealand, France and China have all either fully or partially gone away from them. The bull pup entry of the 6.8mm is brave but the guy in charge is ex British officer so should be good gun but think he will have hard time convincing them. The American… Read more »

dan
dan
17 days ago
Reply to  Oscar Zulu

I wonder if the Brits and Aussies are hoping that the GD 6.8mm bullpup wins the US Army’s next gen battle rifle(s) competition?I personally think not since the US military has never carried a bullpup rifle before and even countries that have bullpups for their conventional forces, their SF troops are ditching them for M4 type weapons.

John N
John N
17 days ago

Over the coming weeks we should see some pretty good video from Talisman Sabre 2021, here’s a taste of what’s to come:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-93r4y48Ifc

Cheers,

Last edited 17 days ago by John N
John N
John N
17 days ago

Here’s some video of the recent Exercise Sea Explorer that included Royal Marines:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5_y-PrqudVU

I hope you Poms enjoy your time here in Oz!

Cheers,

PS, you’ll notice the Royal Marine calls HMAS Canberra and Choules ‘HMS’, wishful thinking perhaps??

Last edited 17 days ago by John N
Michael.R
Michael.R
17 days ago
Reply to  John N

Talk about wishfull thinking, wait until QE arrives in Oz. Perhaps in hindsite you should have saved up your dollars, and gone for the full monty.

John N
John N
15 days ago
Reply to  Michael.R

Mate, a QE Class carrier is just too expensive and too much ship for the RAN, and anyway the RAN isn’t planning to get back into the carrier business.

Not every navy can have everything, but as part of a future coalition operation in our part of the world, the RAN will contribute well enough.

michael
michael
15 days ago
Reply to  John N

I’m sure it will.

David Steeper
David Steeper
17 days ago
Reply to  John N

Whats 1 letter between friends !

John N
John N
17 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Ha ha! Very good.

But your not getting Canberra and you’re definitely not getting Choules (Largs Bay) back either!!

David Steeper
David Steeper
16 days ago
Reply to  John N

That’s fighting talk my friend. 😀 

Richard B
Richard B
17 days ago
Reply to  John N

Back in the 1950/60’s the RN’s LPH’s revolutionised amphibious warfare. Now, after the sale (without replacement) of HMS Ocean to Brazil in 2018, the RN/RM can only regard with jealously the RAN’s two LHD’s.

John N
John N
17 days ago
Reply to  Richard B

Unfortunately for the RN that is the case, on the other side of the coin, and fortunately for the RAN it’s the opposite, the two Canberra class LHDs have given the RAN a massive increase in amphibious capabilities, and ably assisted by HMAS Choules, who by the way, is planned to replaced by two ships:

https://www.navalnews.com/event-news/pacific-2019/2019/10/pacific-2019-navantia-australia-unveils-joint-support-ship-design/

Maybe those Royal Marines won’t want to go home and stay here in Oz instead!

Cheers,

David Steeper
David Steeper
16 days ago
Reply to  John N

Whatever you do don’t let them see the video on youtube of the guy trying to catch a Huntsman spider on the ceiling in his house.

John N
John N
16 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Mate, the general rule here in Oz that most of us follow is:

“Don’t screw with the wildlife and it won’t screw with you!”

As for Huntsman, they’re harmless, they are good at catching other annoying insect pests in your home.

Where they do scare the crap out of you is when they get in your car, hide behind the sun visor, you drive into the sun, reach up to fold it down and end up with a Huntsman in your lap whilst driving, lots of fun, not! Ha ha!!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=V2jGK5niQEA

Cheers,

David Steeper
David Steeper
16 days ago
Reply to  John N

  :wpds_shock: 

Martyn Palmer
Martyn Palmer
15 days ago
Reply to  John N

A mate of mine from Newcastle Aus told me sensible people keep a huntsman like a pet cos it preys on the really dangerous stuff that you don’t want to fuck around with

John N
John N
15 days ago
Reply to  Martyn Palmer

Mate, one of the ‘fun’ uses for a Huntsman is when you have overseas visitors staying at your home.

There is the usual inevitable scream from one of them when they come face to face with a resident Huntsman for the first time, much anxiety, etc.

The usual response is “oh, it’s only a Huntsman, they won’t hurt you, just leave it alone”, lots of fun to watch!!

Mark Forsyth
Mark Forsyth
15 days ago
Reply to  John N

John, surprised he didn’t refer to Choules as Largs Bay, but maybe he was a bit to young for that.

Ron
Ron
17 days ago

God, if there’s one type of ship that I wish the RN could have it would be the Aussie Canberra class. The RN escort numbers look like they are going in the right direction, our carriers are good, and the future of the Royal Marines looks stable with Albion and Bulwark remaining in the fleet until the 2030s and 6 Multi Role Support Ships. Yet there is one thing missing a versitile flat top. Canberra type ships could operate in three military roles and a humanitarian role. The military roles would be Amphibious assault with a combined air group and… Read more »

Joseph
Joseph
17 days ago
Reply to  Ron

There was more of a case for me to having several smaller and multi role carriers in the RN than two large sitting ducks. Ocean is missed. The Wasp Class provide an example with every one offering a “mix” of capability. We are never going to replay “D” Day, and even a Falkands scale landing is beyond UK capability now. Still, big is beautiful to some eh?

John N
John N
16 days ago
Reply to  Ron

A joint RN, RAN, RCN & RNZN fleet? Never going to happen, or should it, despite the very close historical and cultural relationships, four sovereign nations with different views and priorities.

Sure we’ll continue to be coalition partners, but the RAN & RNZN have a primary focus that is different to the RN & RCN.

Speaking for Australia, our primary military alliance is with the US and will continue to be, and that’s not likely to change anytime soon, if ever.

Leslie Leveson
Leslie Leveson
16 days ago

The way the worlds is changing, in my opinion its time for Australia to update to modern defence technology as the Dragon starts to breathe fire in the near regions.A laying of sonar buoys to record activity around ifs coast, monitoring submarine activity and surface ships that may encroach into its waters.1

John N
John N
16 days ago
Reply to  Leslie Leveson

In fact there is a project that is currently going to tender:

https://adbr.com.au/rfi-for-integrated-undersea-surveillance-system-iuss-issued/

Erich Elkins
Erich Elkins
13 days ago

I welcome the heightened pace of military exercises on the part of allied Western forces in the Indo-Pacific, but I wonder if we actually have a clear strategic vision on the kind of war we are are planning and willing to fight with China, should it come to that. Is it about preventing, for example, an invasion of Taiwan or the Philippines or retaking anyone of those two countries should they be overwhelmed by an initial onslaught of Mainland Chinese forces? As in so many recent Western interventions in the Middle East and in Afghanistan, we tend to suffer from… Read more »

Rodd Fiel
Rodd Fiel
8 hours ago
Reply to  Erich Elkins

Like France in ww2, most of those countries in the first island chain will have to wait for the world to return.
We will be back.
I would hope that they have some type of planning in regards to operating an insurgency behind the lines