MBDA has signed a contract with Sweden for the delivery of Common Anti-air Modular Missiles (CAMMs).

This agreement, brokered between MBDA and the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration FMV, involves equipping the Royal Swedish Navy’s Visby Class Corvettes with CAMMs, to be deployed via MBDA’s Sea Ceptor naval air defence system.

Sea Ceptor, a state-of-the-art naval air defence system, is well known for its ability to provide comprehensive self- and local area air defence.

It can counter a wide array of threats, including supersonic anti-ship missiles, attack helicopters, and un-crewed air vehicles. Notably, the system is adept at handling simultaneous attacks, including saturation attacks, from any direction.

Eric Beranger, CEO of MBDA, emphasised the significance of this contract. “CAMM will provide Sweden and the Royal Swedish Navy with a formidable air defence capability that gives the country a strong new contribution to NATO together with other allied Sea Ceptor users like the Royal Navy from the United Kingdom. We’re proud also to be continuing our long history of partnership with Sweden and Swedish industry, including Saab.”

Sweden now joins a growing list of countries, such as Poland, the UK, Italy, Canada, and Brazil, that have selected the CAMM family for their latest generation naval and ground-based air defence needs.

You can read more about this by clicking here.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also previously worked for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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UKDJ
UKDJ
16 days ago

You’d think it would be a good idea to battle test these weapons now in Ukraine if they’re going to form the back-bone of our air-defence for the next decade.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
16 days ago

Great. This means that the program has a healthy R&D budget moving forwards. Volume will keeps costs for RN down. MOD will get back some or all of the R&D investments made given how widely the program has sold abroad. It is a testament to how good the system is that it is selling so well in such a crowded market place. Let’s see how ER and MR sell too. This is a big deal make no mistake about it. Anyone constantly crowing about US systems had better have a look at this. Cost per shot is lower. Open architecture.… Read more »

Grinch
Grinch
16 days ago

Raytheon ESSM sold to 15 countries.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
16 days ago
Reply to  Grinch

Sure it has.

But Sea Ceptor sales are taking impressive bites of the pie.

Other navies are validating MOD/RN choices with their orders.

Louis
Louis
16 days ago
Reply to  Grinch

and so far Sea Ceptor has sold to 10 countries.
Polands CAMM deal is one of the the largest export Air Defence deals this century, if not the largest.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
16 days ago
Reply to  Grinch

12 operators, or future operators at my count of CAMM from all round the Globe. So very promising in my view for a relatively new system.

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
16 days ago
Reply to  Grinch

ESSM has sold to 17 countries in 25 years….

CAMM has sold to 14 services in 5 years….

I’d argue that CAMM was a harder sell as well as it didn’t have the SM1/SM2/Mk.41 userbase to sell straight into either…

Jim
Jim
16 days ago
Reply to  Grinch

But ESSM been around a lot longer, look at CAMM compared to sea wolf, it’s been a great success.

Richard Beedall
Richard Beedall
16 days ago
Reply to  Jim

Sea Wolf was a huge disappointment sales wise. On paper GWS-25 seemed like a world beater in the 1970’s, but it proved to be too hefty, complex and expensive. What was perceived to be a mediocre performance in the Falklands War (at least compared to the promises) all but ended ended potential export interest, and even the RN decided that Goalkeeper and Phalanx were better options for point defence.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
15 days ago

Performance down south was good and afterwards it remained a good if complex system
The RN put VLSW GWS 26 on T23 and not Phalanx or Goalkeeper. The difference being the missile. Trackers remained pretty much unchanged as R911
Goalkeeper was a system looking for a home in RN service. The MOD bought it as a sweetener to the Dutch navy choosing RR engines for its frigates.

monkey spanker
monkey spanker
15 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

I always thought sea wolf had a good reputation. Love the goalkeeper aswell. Wish it was kept in service.

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
15 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

IIRC Goalkeeper also far outperformed Phalanx in the early days as well. It’s ability to re-engage was far ahead. Phalanx was also appallingly unreliable for its first decade of service.

klonkie
klonkie
13 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

Hi Rudeby. I found it peculiar the Americans did not adopt Goalkeeper – seemed odd . Particularly when considering the gun was American built

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
12 days ago
Reply to  klonkie

It was a case of Not Invented Here, plus they had Phalanx on the way which was cheaper, and easier to mount to existing vessels. The US was also primarily focused on Soviet high diver missiles. AEGIS for example could not engage sea skimmers until the late 80’s, partly due to the software but also because the Standard Missiles could not intercept that low.

Goalkeepers gun, and crucially the mount were American. There were actually quite a few CIWS designed around the same gun and mount, including a Vickers design but Goalkeeper got out first and took all the business.

klonkie
klonkie
12 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

thanks for the reply Rudeboy interesting stuff, particularly around AEGIS. I do recall the soviet supersonic high dive missiles back in the 80s, principally as aircraft carrier killers carried by TU 22M.

klonkie
klonkie
14 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

hi GB . Hop your well Mate. I did think the RN missed a trick not converting all the Leander batch 3 frigates to sea wolf standard(there were only 5). I recall about four served on to the late ’80s as gun frigates?

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
14 days ago
Reply to  klonkie

The costs to refit them were ruinous, not far off the cost of a new ship, it was genuinely better to accelerate the T22’s & 23’s.

Klonkie
Klonkie
14 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

an interesting insight Rudeboy- thank you for that.

klonkie
klonkie
13 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Hi GB. Mate, I have a Seawolf related question for you. I believe the system was designed to destroy targets incoming to the ship/system(hence point defence). Was Seawolf able to defend other nearby vessels? .i.e engaging targets that were not a direct threat to the Seawolf armed ship?

Netking
Netking
16 days ago

This is good news. Competition promotes innovation and at least in theory, lower prices.

John Clark
John Clark
16 days ago

It’s an excellent system and one of the areas we excell at….

David Barry
David Barry
16 days ago

Should Sweden have deemed that a visby needs this protection, what should our B2 OPVs look forward to receiving?

Coll
Coll
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

I can only imagine because the Visby Class Corvette operates nearer to Russia. Also, I’m pretty sure that the Baltic fleet sail very close to Sweden to exit the Baltic Sea.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Navy PODS should have this covered. Hopefully.

AlexS
AlexS
16 days ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

Navy PODS need a radar because Rivers don’t have a proper Air search radar.

BB85
BB85
16 days ago
Reply to  AlexS

I wonder if the Artisan radars can be fitted to the R2’s once the Type 23 frigates are decommissioned. My understanding is the Type 26 are getting new radars.

Coll
Coll
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

It looks like the French have ordered 7 Patrouilleurs Hauturier OPVs. Looks good.

Last edited 16 days ago by Coll
Order of the Ditch
Order of the Ditch
16 days ago
Reply to  Coll

It looks like the French have ordered 7 Patrouilleurs Hauturier OPVs. Looks good.

The French got 7 vessels for 900 million Euros, they are equipped with a helo hangar and even have a hull mounted sonar. Meanwhile the UK paid over the odds for B2 Rivers just to keep shipbuilding skills alive because we didn’t order T26 on time, then we have the fact that the T31s don’t even have a hull mounted sonar despite being significantly larger vessels expected to go into hotter situations.
Once again bravo MoD & UK Gov!

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
15 days ago

USN Constellation class FF wont have a hull mounted sonar…

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Then they become warships are are sent into harms way? They are not really big hulls with diverse prime drivers so won’t fight after one hit.

That would kill T32.

PODS Sea Ceptor should be for Albions which have BAE CMS and Artisan so should slot into it as all the same as T23. So no big R&D risk there.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
16 days ago

Yep the words “in harms way” are most apt. Whats next NSM on the Gib patrol boats 🥴 Do people not realise there is a pot of money and it is finite, spend money on some hair braind idea diverts it from a must have. Like Magazines with a full load or proper spares provision. It’s all a matter of priorities. And to be honest the River class have proved to be remarkably reliable and deliver exactly what it says on the packet. But then it does help if part of the original contractual obligations put the availability in as… Read more »

Last edited 16 days ago by ABCRodney
Frank62
Frank62
16 days ago

Harms way can happen anywhere. That’s the folly of using virtually unarmed Rivers where we really need warship presence.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
16 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

Rivers are only any use for fisheries / constabulary type work.

They only make sense in a safe orderly world. The one we had 10 years ago.

I’d rather see B1 & B2 retired and 5 x T32 take their place.

That way fighting mass returns.

Andrew D
Andrew D
16 days ago

Agree but wishful thinking 👍

Ryan
Ryan
16 days ago

Aren’t some of the roles the Rivers fill, like fishery protection, WI or Falklands guard ships etc, a bit of a waste of a T31? If they’re actually fitted with the 32 Mk41 cells it’s said they will, having them float around Stanley or the Caribbean when an OPV can do the job

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
16 days ago
Reply to  Ryan

In the alternative you have row of warships doing nothing but with a crew.

I apprise that in accountant think it isn’t a good use of resources.

But if you have bought a real warship it can do other duties.

BTW RN no longer does fisheries and something bigger and toothier than a River might be required to stop Chinese fishing fleets.

klonkie
klonkie
13 days ago

Hello SB . I think that is the general plan re the B1s retiring and and replaced by type 32’s? That being said, watch the next government come into power and stuff the whole plan up!

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Nothing ! And because unlike the Visby class they aren’t designed for combat. They are OPVs simple as that and serve that function very well, just as they were designed for.

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
16 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Visby is their main surface combatant….not the equivalent of a River Class….Visby is essentially Sweden’s Type 23/26…

And it was designed with a SAM from day 1, it was originally going to be the Umkhonto, but cutbacks meant it was FFBNW.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
15 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

The rivers B2 need the 40mm Bofors and yes sea Ceptor and maybe a few NSMs. Make them a useful 2nd line patrol and surface combatant (light combat)

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
15 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Well if you intend fitting that then you also need a command system, a 3D search radar, improved chilled water cooling, displays, data networks, operators, extra accom, bigger fridges, more Logs staff redundant power supplies, Magazine capacity increases, bigger fire pumps, Auto spray systems probably with a fresh water pressurised tank system, a new platform risk assessment…you may as well add in ESM and data links for CAMM to also use… A helo/UAS and hangar for OTH targeting
Suddenly an OPV is a T31…

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
15 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

🤣😂🤣😂 I bow to your clear expertise on this matter Gun. Genuinely didn’t realise there was so much upgrading that would need to be done. Could the Rivers at least get the 40mm Bofors gun?

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
14 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Thats do able with a decent EO tracker. But you will still need all the gubbins that go with it unless you go command system lite and just locally operate it from a standalone console.
Still need the mag upgrades I would guess.

Jonno
Jonno
15 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

They have a combat system without the sensors and weapons of a small warship. See where they go with that.

Jonathan
Jonathan
14 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Hi Barry the Visby is an armed to the teeth fast attack boat that’s primary job will be to throw itself strait in the face of any Russia amphibious operations..it will be operating in the most high threat navel environment you could possibly get…they are going to hide in the Baltic coastline then charge out fight and die…that’s their jobs…the B2 is a constabulary OPV, designed to chase drug runners, illegal fishing vessels and the odd pirate in the most cost effective way possible…adding CAMM makes it less cost effective and may even encourage some idiot to put it in… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
14 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

My given name is David…

I agree with your description of the Visby role, however, I disagree with analysis that B2s should not have CAMM, from drones to helis, organisations and countries with interests counter to those of the UK are proliferating, having self defence is a must.

Ask the crews of Antelope and Ardent.

Jonathan
Jonathan
14 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Hi david, antelope and ardent were frigates, their job was to go in harms way, they did have air defence systems equivalent to the vast majority of all RN frigates at that time…the simple true was that at that time you could not fit adequate air defences on frigates of the size that the RN had…if you looked at the RN of the early 1980/1982 the following actual war ships could not defend themselves: 7 type 81s ( sea cat) 8 type 21s (sea cat) The last 2 type 12 …40mm bofors The last 8 type 12m..40mm bofors The 16… Read more »

klonkie
klonkie
12 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

An excellent piece of commentary Jonathan – well written. I’d add the County class destroyers to your list of Sea cat armed vessels (or should I say under armed)

I personally believe the RN missed a trick in not fitting a CIWS (Phalanx) to the Type 21 and batch 2 Leander’s post the Falklands. In particular in light of the Type 21’s experience. I imagine the MOD bean counters had something to do with that .

Jonathan
Jonathan
11 days ago
Reply to  klonkie

Hi Klonkie, indeed the county class were also not blessed with a great AAW fit…as for fitting type 21 and type 12i with phalanx. I agree it would have been wise considering the lessons and something that would not have impacted on top weight. After all the type 12i was still in service a decade later… people do tend to underestimate how profoundly different the AAW capabilities of the modern RN escort fleet is compared to 20 years ago…every escort now (even the ASW escorts) are capable of providing a pretty formidable short range area defence capability ( 32 CAMMs… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
11 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

cheers Jonathan – good commentary re the CAMM system

donald_of_tokyo
donald_of_tokyo
16 days ago

Great news. CAMM is becoming a great export success.

Four Five Right
Four Five Right
16 days ago

People forget about the importance of CAMM not being from the USA and therefore not ITAR or an FMS from the US state department.

Crabfat
Crabfat
16 days ago

“Sweden now joins a growing list of countries, such as Poland, the UK, Italy, Canada, and Brazil, that have selected the CAMM family for their latest generation naval and ground-based air defence needs”. As has been discussed here for a long time, UK does not have any GBAD to speak of (if it has any at all). Here’s a ‘British’ company flogging CAMM to all and sundry EXCEPT to the UK.

Coll
Coll
15 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

What about Sky Sabre? Also (Link)

Jon
Jon
15 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

UK has a minimal number of Sky Sabre systems, featuring CAMM and entering service in 2021 (some sources say 2020). One battery was destined for the Falklands in 2021, the others to be moved where most needed, which I’m guessing right now will be Eastern Europe, I believe one UK battery was revealed to be in Poland. This is a new capability and most agree this isn’t anywhere near enough so far. Last year, MOD announced a new GBAD plan for a multi-layer defence as “a Category A Government Major Project Portfolio (GMPP) programme”, to be purchased in stages over… Read more »

monkey spanker
monkey spanker
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Is that the billion pound radar? It’s a lot of money for essentially a couple of minutes warning for the top levels of government.
Is it still going to purchase an American radar?
Long range missile defence is an expensive game to be in. Where the £10 billion odd will come from is anyone guess.
Lots of other items that should have as high a priority.
We will wait and see what happens.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
14 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Yes, Poland and FI.
Gentle correction, seems it is half a Battery deployed at each. Apparently, each Battery consists of 2 Fire Groups. And one FG is in Poland, the other in the FI, of the Battery covering these commitments.
Each Fire Group has 3 Launcher Vehicles, 1 Radar, 1 Control vehicle.

Toby J
Toby J
14 days ago
Reply to  Jon

BMD radar? Does that mean we’ll be getting BMD? Surely there’s no point having a billion £ radar if we can’t do anything about it?

Airborne
Airborne
15 days ago

Now im no missile ninja but it does seem that the CAMMs sea ceptor is becoming the system most people want and need. I see a new sense of urgency in many NATO, and none NATO countries!

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
15 days ago

Going to be interesting where the Swede’s squeeze the CAMM onboard their Visby’s and how many. Are they going with CAMM or CAMM-MR like the Poles or a mix? It’d be good to get the Norwegians and Danes signed up to CAMM too, but a bit late with Finland who’ve gone with ESSM on their corvettes. Babcock UK is also working with Sweden on their next corvettes which could have a lot of international potential. Something from them might even turn up in the RN!

Last edited 15 days ago by Quentin D63
Oli G
Oli G
15 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Poles are going for CAMM-ER on their ships in short term and developing MR with us (the UK) for use starting in 2030 or later. The swedes are going to fit the CAMM behind their superstructure on the Visby’s, I believe you can see it on the picture at the top of the article 👍 .

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
15 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

It will be CAMM on the Visby in 1 3×3 cell ExLS configuration for a total of 36 missiles.

The Lulea Class which are following in c2030 will probably get CAMM, but may also get CAMM-MR.

Norway and Denmark are ESSM/SM-2 users I’m afraid…..

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
15 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

Sorry Rudeboy, but how do you get 36 from 3×3?😁 Don’t they like our 24 🍄 CAMM configuration? 😂. We might still be able to convince the Norwegians and Danes on CAMM.

Last edited 15 days ago by Quentin D63
Rudeboy
Rudeboy
14 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

3 x 3 = 9 cell.

Each cell has 4 CAMM (quad packed).

4 x 9 = 36 missiles.

Total buy will be around 250 missiles (5 x 36, reloads and test/trial missiles).

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
14 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

Thanks, got it. I missed the quad pack bit! That’s quite a CAMM missile load along with everything else on such a compact ship!

Julian
Julian
15 days ago

I’d be interested to know what all of these countries are using to host their CAMM canisters. As I understand it the mushroom farm on T23 was driven by expediency to essentially repurpose the previous launch tubes which is perfectly sensible but on new builds does seem to me to not be getting maximum packing density and quad-packing into a system designed for hot launch seems a bit wasteful in terms of the host silo being over specified for what is needed for CAMM. One of the big advantages of CAMM is the relative simplicity of the cold launch (no… Read more »

Ray Knight
Ray Knight
15 days ago
Reply to  Julian

I think it would make a lot of sense to install one or two sets of VLS-41 on the two QE class carriers. There is plenty of deck space, that will never see the number of aircraft originally envisaged. The most optimisc plans for the carriers for now centre on UAVs/ drones. We could have kept HMS Ocean for that limited ambition or use a coverted container ship for that! Installing VLS-41 would give great flexibility for better carrier/ fleet defence with CAAM, advanced ASM etc. Pressure on the surface fleet would be much reduced. These carriers are particularly vulnerable… Read more »

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
15 days ago
Reply to  Julian

Visby will be using the LM ExLS standalone system, which will also be used by Canada on their CSC. ExLS will also be used on Saudi Arabia’s MMSC vessels, but whether its standalone or using ExLS as a liner in Mk.41 is unknown at present.

Think we will see the UK use ExLS for CAMM as well in the future…

Rob N
Rob N
15 days ago

A great choice, it also has a limited anti-ship capability that may prove useful…

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
14 days ago
Reply to  Rob N

If we actually get LPS up and running (and the indications are that we will) you could pretty much guarantee a sale to most Sea Ceptor users as well…it would be a fantastic littoral strike missile.

Toby J
Toby J
14 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

LPS? What’s that?

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
14 days ago
Reply to  Toby J

Land Precision Strike.

Essentially a CAMM shapre (not a repurposed CAMM missile though, it has a larger diameter of 178 rather than 166mm) with Brimstone or EO/IR seeker head. Allegedly has150km range (I’m doubtful of that…think 80km is more realistic). Can be fired from M270, a Boxer mount and Land Ceptor/Sea Ceptor.

https://www.mbda-systems.com/product/land-precision-strike/

Toby J
Toby J
14 days ago
Reply to  Toby J

Never mind, I looked it up. Yes, it looks excellent

Toby J
Toby J
14 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

Will LPS fit in Sea Ceptor? If so then it will quad pack into mk41. Sounds a useful bit of kit esp for t31 anti-small boat at 80km range

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
12 days ago
Reply to  Toby J

Yes the 178mm missile will fit in the same canister as CAMM and CAMM-ER.

Rob
Rob
12 days ago

Thats great news. MBDA (Airbus/BAE Systems/Leonardo) are doing really well.