The U.S. Air Force has published a report featuring concept art for the ‘Next Generation Air Dominance’ fighter.

Most details about the aircraft itself,beyond a rough idea of how it might look, remains a mystery due to the programme largely being classified.

According to USNI here, the U.S. Air Force has said that NGAD exists to examine five major technologies that are likely to appear on next generation aircraft, with the goal of enhancements in survivability, lethality, and persistence. It has not specified what four of those technologies are.

“The one acknowledged NGAD-related technology is propulsion. Over the past few years, the Air Force has invested substantially in variable cycle engines. Other likely candidates include new forms of stealth; advanced weapons, including directed energy; and thermal management. The current engine on the F-35 and its variants expected to be on the B-21 produce a tremendous amount of electrical power that can enable new weapons. That could require advanced techniques to manage generated heat, so that it does not become part of the aircraft signatures and make the plane easier to detect.”

Describing the programme, the report says:

“Designed to complement the F-35, F-22, joint, and partner forces in the Air Superiority role, Next Generation Air Dominance is an advanced aircraft program for development of penetrating counter air platforms with multi-domain situational awareness, agile resilient communications, and an integrated family of capabilities.

The program uses a non-traditional acquisition approach to avoid traditional monolithic program schedules and exorbitant life-cycle sustainment costs. This strategy, called the Digital Century Series approach, creates a realistic business case for industry to adopt commercial best practices for key design activities – before a part is even manufactured.”

Background

In September 2020, U.S. Air Force acquisition executive Dr. Will Roper announced that the Air Force had flown a full-scale flight demonstrator as part of the Next-Generation Air Dominance programme.

The announcement came as a surprise to many observers, both as the NGAD program was believed to be an early-phase technology development program unlikely to yield hardware in the near term, and because funding began two years ago, which is unusually fast to design and build a military aircraft.

You can read more about the history of the project here.

Additionally, you can read more about the UK’s own next generation fighter by following the link below.

New image of new British fighter jet

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Alex
Alex
6 months ago

Seems like only last year they brought them into service

Frost
Frost
6 months ago

“if it looks right, it will fly right” – That doesn’t look right. It looks like a sixth form project done in the 1970s.

Mark B
Mark B
6 months ago

Looks like a shed roof …

Lebron
Lebron
6 months ago

Lot’s of airfix unveiled this year by world powers

geoff
geoff
6 months ago
Reply to  Lebron

I had a Westland Lysander and a Comet-the piston engined racer, not the jet

Ron5
Ron5
6 months ago

Won’t look anything like that.

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron5

What will it look like then ?

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

😂😂😂

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

Well I would say if it does look like that then I might just be, outside of the program itself at least, the worlds greatest expert upon its aerodynamic performance and flight.characteristics. Because as a kid I just loved taking those large left over polystyrene ceiling tiles splitting them down the middle diagonally and adding a couple of vertical fins and a bit of nose weight. They flew rather well though had a tendency to stall and nose dive occasionally and generally were lucky to last more than 5 or 6 flights without irreparable damage though I suspect material science… Read more »

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Ha ha and Ha ha again !!!! lol, I too experimented with advanced aerodynamic designs based upon Balsa and Paper having long given up trying to get the Airfix stuff to stay aloft. ( why can a 15 ton Metal thing fly so far when a few grams of plastic just nosed dived Stuka style into the ground ! ) I also think Mr Musk is not very clever, how can he be when every test flight ends the same way ?

DJ
DJ
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

Look at a compilation of Musk crashes and you’ll see that with Falcon at least, there really is a happy ending!
Here’s to a happy landing (x-fingers) for SN15!

Jonathan
Jonathan
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

I am in awe of you sir, all those wasted polystyrene tiles I could have been launching into the air……what a missed opportunity.

Jonathan
Jonathan
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

My money is on it looking like an airplane of some description.

GlynH
GlynH
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

I believe it was the great Geoffrey de Havilland who said “if it looks right, it probably is right”. I may be wrong but that was in reference to the proto Mosquito, not yet flown but take a step back and look, just look . . it looked right. The F22 looks right, the F/A-XX looks right, the B-21 looks right. That thing in the header does not 🙂

Nate m
Nate m
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

that thing looks like an over stuffed turkey. how on earth is that thing gonna get of the ground?

Last edited 6 months ago by Nate m
George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron5

I still don’t get what the F-35 was for then? The USAF have got their fighter, I thought the USN needed a carrier-born air superiority fighter i.e. F/A-xx. ? So now USAF wants a fighter-to-fighter? They are going to order 1,700 F-35s, where would this new righter sit? The former is already costing $1.7 trillion, where are they finding the money for this?

I guess the US is hellbent on turning the USD into monopoly money at this point, as they know they’re drowning in debt. Might as well ride that world reserve currency status, until the wheels fall off.

TrevorH
TrevorH
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

F35 is not an air superiority aircraft.

Matt C
Matt C
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Joint STRIKE Fighter, not Joint Superiority Fighter.

With regard to debt, most major Western nations have more of a problem on that score than the US does.

Stu
Stu
6 months ago
Reply to  Matt C

US debt has reached 139% of GDP this year. That’s one of the highest in the world and most nations have significantly less in fact. During the pandemic the UK’s debt has reached 111% of GDP for comparison. The US does have particular currency advantages when it comes to borrowing admittedly, but its debt is huge.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_public_debt

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Stu

I think our debt went to 99% debt to GDP. America is cruising at 130%. However, they have debt out of their eyeballs. Corporate debt, household debt, student debt, credit card debt, state debt, etc.

By 2025 they’ll be heading for Japanfication at 191%. At that point, their world reserve currency status is pretty much dead. We should move back onto the gold standard before its too late.

Last edited 6 months ago by George Royce
Jonny Agar
Jonny Agar
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

USA also has a crumbling infrastructure that needs updating bridges,Roads,Railways and buildings they have not maintained. USA was happy to spend what it had and now cannot afford to replace what it has. Hence the tax hikes and cuts to services

Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Post-war UK debt was 240% of GDP! It was brought down to 100% of GDP by 1962.

So those record highs were not the end of the world moment!

Deep32
Deep32
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

As I understand things George, both the USAF and the USN require/want a air superiority fighter. I think that for the USAF it will eventually replace thecF22 despite what the article says. Indeed the USN released some renderings of their version the other week.
Seems to me that the F35 isn’t measuring up to the sum of all its parts (I know it’s not a air superiority fighter but has to fight other aircraft, especially where nations just have the one type of jet). Perhaps I’m wrong on that score, but, recent developments seem to point otherwise!

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
6 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

The Navy seem to want a replacement for the Super Hornet which means Air Superiority and strike missions and preferably two engines. The strike missions seem to be hovering around attacking less defended objectives (of itself or behind F35 defence softening) but rather significantly and importantly able to use greater range than the F35 and/or with greater stand off range weaponry because there are serious doubts about the long term practicality of the F35 longer term when the carriers are increasingly threatened by weapons that keep them at the edge of its range even with their current bomb bay stand… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Agree with all of this, truth be told, never saw the sense in only having the one engine for carrier ops, don’t think the USN went much on the idea either, as traditionally the vast majority of their aircraft have always been twin engines for obvious reason.
I don’t know if the two programmes will ever be able to merge into one type, perhaps the whole F35 venture has put doubt into too many minds. Time will tell, as will costs, so we shall have to wait and see what develops.

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

The USN Navy are really missing the legs that the F14 could deliver. The F18 doesn’t cut it as a fleet defence fighter. The USN are worried about the plethora and disparity of anti-ship missiles threatening the Fleet. The fleet defence fighter is hopefully going to correct the F18s short comings, especially range, thereby pushing out the combat air patrol ring.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

It’s to compliment the F35, not replace.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

“The Joint Strike Fighter program was intended to replace the United States military General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, A10,F/A-18 Hornet, AV-8B Harrier ll.

Vice President of Strategy and Business Development for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, predicted in 2006 that the F-35 would be four times more effective than legacy fighters in air-to-air combat, eight times more effective in air-to-ground combat, and three times more effective in reconnaissance and Suppression of enemy air defences – while having better range and requiring less logistics support and having around the same procurement costs (if development costs are ignored) as legacy fighters.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_F-35_Lightning_II_development

geoff
geoff
6 months ago

Mind boggling science fiction stuff. From Kitty Hawk to this in just over a Century

Sean Crowley
Sean Crowley
6 months ago
Reply to  geoff

Whats even funnier is a pattern Clerk in Switzerland dismissing flying machines as Pie in the sky while at the same time discovering Relativity and proving the existence of the Atom while two bicycle mechanics went on to invent the Aeroplane .

geoff
geoff
6 months ago
Reply to  Sean Crowley

🙂 truth stranger than proverbial fiction!

Andy P
Andy P
6 months ago

I reckon if I was let loose on the crayons I could come up with something fancier with more missiles and stuff. Maybe a couple of gun turrets like the Millenium Falcon as well.

RobW
RobW
6 months ago

Lets just hope we stick to a deliverable design for Tempest with technologies that work. Ignore what the US is doing to a certain extent. Tempest needs to be a step up from Typhoon and at least on par with anything Russia or China can build. We don’t need to chase “next generation air dominance” in the same way the US will, which will no doubt come at a huge cost.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  RobW

INdeed, we should not copy the US. But we need to admit, a flying triangle design is the future.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

This looks to owe more design lineage to the F117 rather than the F22.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Yes indeed. Imagine a F117, but tighter and no tailerons. That’s the kind of design Tempest should focus on.

John Clark
John Clark
6 months ago
Reply to  RobW

To be fair Rob, Typhoon, upgraded with Radar 2 and the other planned improvements is already better than anything China and Russia can deploy in the next 10 years. The Russians seem to be flailing about with troublesome expensive projects that don’t appear to be a huge advance on the Flanker series, particularly the excellent Su35. China is advancing very quickly however, with the money to ‘dream it, build it’ (then incrementally modify and fix), aka the J20, they are making extraordinary progress in aviation. The particular Chinese blend of Command and Market economic models, allows them to do this.… Read more »

Andy G
Andy G
6 months ago
Reply to  John Clark

Also engines, we are 2 generations ahead of them and they are having real problems catching up. The other great advantage we currently have is submarines.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
6 months ago
Reply to  Andy G

Beat me to it presently they are trying to obtain more Russian engines u till they can produce something that not only produces the required thrust but can do so for longer than it takes the J20 to get into the air. That aircraft and others are simply hobbled by the reverse engineered engines. However once they do solve that years down the line and other problems they will be tough to match overall I fear. Their designs are certainly overtaking the Russians in airframes and capabilities.

John Clark
John Clark
6 months ago
Reply to  Andy G

Good point Andy, both the Russians and the Chinese are way behind in advanced power plant design and construction.

In the case of China, it doesn’t matter what blank cheque they might write to cover it, you simply can’t just make it happen, advanced propulsion is really the pinnacle of high end engineering and few countries do it as well as the UK.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  John Clark

Agreed. With what we have available to us now in terms of upgrades and the way things are shaping up both here in Europe and in the South China sea, I would have preferred it if we replaced the Tranche 1’s until the arrival of Tempest.

We could easily find ourselves in a shooting war before the end of this decade the way things are looking.

Radar 2
LERX ( designed and tested will excellent results)
Thrust Vectoring (available since 2010 with many advantages)
Conformal Fuel Tanks
Meteor (JNAAM should arrive by 2025/6)
Advanced EW counter measures(Digital Stealth-Leonardo Praetorian)

https://defense-update.com/20110209_typhoon_tvn.html

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Clearly, we cannot compete with China on Ship numbers, but their is a cheaper and much quicker solution to the problem.

“A few months after having test fired a JSM from a US Air Force 416th Flight Test Squadron (FLTS) F-16C Fighting Falcon, Kongsberg now eyes integration on the Typhoon fighter aircraft. This weapon can be carried on multiple hard points on Typhoon, providing complete Role-Fit flexibility, explained BAE Systems.”

https://www.airrecognition.com/index.php/archive-world-worldwide-news-air-force-aviation-aerospace-air-military-defence-industry/defense-security-exhibitions-news/air-show-2017/lima-2017-bis/lima-2017-news-coverage-report-bis/3367-kongsberg-s-jsm-missile-to-be-added-to-eurofighter-typhoon-weapons-package.html

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Conformal tanks for Typhoon are dead and buried…they don’t work due to aerodynamical issues, confirmed by Airbus.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Interesting, do you have a link to this?

Jonny Agar
Jonny Agar
6 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Follow the issues on the F18s. Have the same issues due to aero issues and leaks

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago

JUST like I have been saying. We need to move to a flying dorito/triangle design for the Tempest. I got berated by commenters but here it is. The future is no tailerons, no canards, flying triangle, hydrogen, etc.

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Makes you wonder why though… after all, most UFO’s are Saucer Shaped !

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

The Aurora secret aircraft that crashed in the UK is something to research. A flying triangle can be made long and thin, able to house a lot of fuel, no tail for better efficiency and take delta design to the next level. It could fly higher than the Typhoon, potentially hit mach 3. RR is working on mach 3 engines with Virgin Galactic. I hope people won’t berate me anymore. It’s coming lads. Best start being a believer now. Flying triangle, hydrogen, no tailorons, no canards, mach 3 capable, and internal bay missiles. When you think of it, its absolutely… Read more »

MikeB1947
MikeB1947
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

One story was that the aircraft that crashed at Boscombe Down in 1994 was a Lockheed Have Blue. However, that is disputed as only two aircraft were officially built and both apparently destroyed in crashes in Nevada during 1978 and 1979. One suggestion is that a third Have Blue was secretly built and flown until the crash at Boscombe.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

I’ve not read any suggestions that was Aurora, which was actually a codename for the B2. I believe an Aurora type exists BTW.

The most credible reports of the Boscombe incident i have read was that it was actually a YF23 type, which should have been the winner of the ATF programme.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago

I have been advocating for a triangular design fighter. To be more stealthy, we could blow jet thrust through the control surfaces for cruising or deeper penetration into a hostile airspace. Of course, when the pilots need to make an aggressive maneuvre they can use the control surfaces conventionally. And we make rudder flaps on the wings fly-by-wire. This involves taking tech from BAE Magma and Taranis to the next level.

I think Tempest should look something like that in the attached photo.

Perhaps we could advance on the heat-absorbing tile technology that was in the YF23’s thrust nozzles?

maxresdefault.jpg
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

No, that’s so 1940s and 50s.
Many “UFO” sightings are Triangular. It’s no coincidence. Plenty of FT sightings over the UK in the early 90s and one that Neatishead tracked from Belgium to the UKADR. Another flew over RAF Cosford.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 months ago

And of course the 1990 Chris Gibson sighting of an FT refuelling from KCs over the North Sea.
If anyone wants any proof there’s stuff up there as yet unacknowledged the MoDs Own UFO report that redacted 2 photos of ongoing programmes will do, and articles from boom operators from the dedicated USAF Squadron that refuels black world aircraft.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago

I have no doubt that we have special projects cooking up as we speak. I just hope it can be utilised in our future aircraft and its not purely just as academic exercise.

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Liquid Hydrogen will never be used as fuel for a fighter type of aircraft, due to the equivalent volume required compared to jet fuel. The much larger volume will require a significantly larger aircraft, at a minimum twice a large.

Andy P
Andy P
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

For now maybe mate, I’m sure some clever clogs down the line will invent a ‘you can’t bend it’ that will make it happen. Its kind of how things go.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

For now yes. But with better tank technology etc, as well as the triangular shape to store more fuel, it will be the future. Hydrogen needs massive infrastructure change/investment, but Airbus is already planning for hydrogen commerical airline travel. It will become the future. It might not be in the first half of this century, but it will beyond 2050. Electric cars are now becoming the norm for goodness sake. Something experts throught would take until 2040-50. But tech is moving very, very fast nowadays.

Rogbob
Rogbob
6 months ago

Interesting layout.

Bit noddy the “V1 to n” idea of changing weapons, engines and components. That just looks like powerpoint engineering from a GCSE project.

Actually changing engines was so expensive in terms of design and certification for F35 they binned it. What revolution has occurred that would obviate needing to go through those processes?

As for new weapons, well blow me down with feather, what a unqiue concept to upgrade the weapons a combat aircraft carries…

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago

This is like the published art of the F117 before it was made public.

It’s got some good points but from the picture’s angle a lot of bad points.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Should the air intakes be underneath the fuselage?

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Yes, because the aircraft holds a flesh sack, it is designed to perform better in the positive g mode rather than the negative. As humans can cope with a higher positive g than a negative. The aircraft is in general designed around this, which is among some of the reasons why engine intakes are below the wing, especially for aerobatic aircraft like fighters. Putting the intake above the wing does have a stealth advantage in that the intake is shielded from ground based radar. However, depending on where the intake is placed, it will have a detrimental affect on the… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

It looks like something from Ace Combat on the PlayStation 😄

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Excellent post. Yes I don’t like the air intakes beside the cockpit in the Tempest mockup either. The F-35 has intakes beside but that’s because it needs the larger bay for bombs. Tempest is F2F, so I hope they change that. Makes the aircraft too fat as well. I think we should opt for a flying triangle, kind of like a F117, but much tighter, no tailerons and intakes that are flatter but underneath the fuselage. Because of the triangular shape, you can afford to flatten the air intakes, thereby reducing the signature. Maybe they want a stealthy fighter that… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by George Royce
Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

The Tempest will Not just be F2F, but a multi-role fighter as well, like the Typhoon which it is to replace. The Tempest will most likely have internal bays like F-35 as well. It will be the professional aerospace engineers at BAES that will decide on the eventual shape of Tempest, Not You!

Last edited 6 months ago by Meirion X
George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Meirion X

Could you put “meow” at the end of every comment. Sums up your petty contributions on this website.

Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Your reply to my realistic reply to your previous comment, sums you up as very petty person indeed!

I was just trying to tell you to you to
let the professional aerospace engineers at BAES to get on with their job of designing Tempest next gen fighter aircraft.
What the country does Not want, is out of control development costs!

Tantrums of a fantastic, it seems?

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

No, present thinking is to go side or preferably top, mostly for stealth reasons. Obviously the presence of a pilot(s) have a say in this.

DaveyB
DaveyB
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

You can’t fudge aerodynamics, the airflow will do what’s easiest or it will diverge and break up by separating and swirling creating wasted emery vortices and drag. Therefore, there must be a compromise to maintain the airflow to the intake, if this aircraft is expected to do aggressive maneuvers. Perhaps they’ll use large maneuvering leading edge extensions like those used on the Su57. These would help to try to maintain a laminar flow to the intake as well as providing high alpha lift and control. These undoubtedly will be less stealthy than a fixed leading edge, but airflow may be… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

emery = energy – duh!

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

I agree, we’re talking about a air superiority fighter here, aerodyamics cannot be compromised too that extent. But maybe for a 6th gen fighter bomber, I’d agree with Spy, have them side by side but never on top.

TrevorH
TrevorH
6 months ago

Perhaps the USAF are trolling the communists?
Why would they expose the shape of this proposal at this time?
The shape is like a F117, which itself was not a fighter.

Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  TrevorH

Yes, give them a Red Herring!

GWM
GWM
6 months ago

The most interesting thing is it apears to have variable vertical tails,down flat for maximum stealth and vertical for WVR.

DaveyB
DaveyB
6 months ago
Reply to  GWM

Don’t get me started!

Peter S
Peter S
6 months ago

A solution without a problem? Unless the USA and the UK with FCAS can break the pattern of exponential cost growth, neither of these projects will achieve delivery.
The F35 is planned to stay in service until 2070, F22 until 2060. Looking at the history of F15,16,18, these dates are not unrealistic. So what gap in the inventory is this supposed to fill?

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  Peter S

Employment Gap ? dunno really apart from the ever constant game of technical advancement.

Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  Peter S

The UK with Tempest, is supposed to be a replacement of the Typhoon multi-role aircraft. If the ambition is a 5.5 Gen successor to Typhoon, a product could be deliverable by 2035. If a more ambitious 6 gen successor is in process, it will be unlikely deliverable before 2040.

dan
dan
6 months ago

I doubt the fighter will have any vertical tails.

John Hartley
John Hartley
6 months ago

It does not seem to have a big enough nose for a high performance AESA intercept radar. It could be a stealthy attack aircraft to replace F-15E Strike Eagles perhaps?

John Hartley
John Hartley
6 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

I read Ben Rich’s book on his time with Skunk works & I wonder if this is one of the F-117 follow-ons that Lockheed offered the USAF in the 1990s, that did not proceed.

Marked
Marked
6 months ago

It’s a concept and hardly representative of what will replace the f22!

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
6 months ago

Interestingly the wing shape itself is not dissimilar to the F22 it’s just like the nose and tail has been squashed into it. I really do think that the demonstrator announcement last Sept was a combination of Trump hype needing to allay public fears they were falling behind Russia/China, what with their announcements of advanced projects to counter combined most like with in essence an F22 with a range of updates and general developments as a flying demonstrator enabling him to make that claim. The lack of any sort of informed renderings tend to back that up it’s the PR… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
6 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Have a look at the BAe image that went with the following link:

BAE develop tech to protect wideband receivers (ukdefencejournal.org.uk)

Have BAe let slip what Tempest may actually look like?

TrevorH
TrevorH
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

But isnt this just another rendering? This is where we came in…

DaveyB
DaveyB
6 months ago
Reply to  TrevorH

Yes, but as concept art, the design is more realistic as it’s a better aerodynamic model, especially compared to the Tempest model BAe have produced and displayed.

Ron5
Ron5
6 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

How would US Bae be privvy to UK Bae’s Tempest design?

DaveyB
DaveyB
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron5

I know they are supposed to be separate entities, but I’m pretty sure there is a lot of communication between the various sites.

The BAe artwork is very similar to the US Navy’s F/A-XX programs artwork that has been released. Which I think is more representative of what is may be coming.

Ron5
Ron5
6 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

There’s a Chinese wall between the two arms of the company.

Meirion X
Meirion X
6 months ago
Reply to  Ron5

Highly likely.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

I think this maybe closer to the mark given the results so far with Magma.
I’m unsure how much weight this might save, but a possible indication to the launch weights for a future EMCAT design onboard the carriers may hold the key compared to a conventional aircraft ?

https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2014/05/whatever-happened-emcat/

Andy
Andy
6 months ago

Looks like Maverick’s ride in the trailer.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
6 months ago

Notable in the report it says that this wont be a mass produced fighter but will be an iteratively upgraded platform in small batches, i.e. they would produce a dozen, tweak the design, produce another dozen, tweak the design and so on…

If you reduced the scale from hundreds to dozens its actually got a lot in common with British WW2 fighter development where they would continually iterate around an engine upgrade or tweaked aerodynamics.

TrevorH
TrevorH
6 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

I do not see the link or similarity with that.
Small numbers seem expensive, unless there is some new inexpensive, efficient way to build in penny packets. Not that many F22s were really built anyway.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
6 months ago
Reply to  TrevorH

This might give us a clue as to how this could be achieved?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cC3GNbEaz1o

MikeB1947
MikeB1947
6 months ago

It has been suggested that a prototype for the F-22 replacement may already be flying and also, a design concept for a F-35 replacement is well advanced. Knowing how the US military is constantly looking into the future, I can accept the idea that there must be a number of classified programmes that are actively being progressed at places such as Area 51 in Nevada.

pkcasimir
pkcasimir
6 months ago

The article does not discuss what is really at the heart of the USAF’s NGAD. (The US Navy is going is own separate way on a sixth generation fighter). The USAF no longer plans to have airplane manufacturers design, build demonstrators, and then compete for fighter contracts. The acquisition process will now split design, production and sustainment. Whoever designs an aircraft may not get the production contract and whoever gest the production contract may not sustain the aircraft in the field. Its a reallocation of roles and is designed to open Air Force programs to firms that aren’t traditional military… Read more »

Peter Crisp
Peter Crisp
6 months ago

Looks like the USAF finally got round to watching Battlestar Galactica.

Steve M
Steve M
6 months ago
Reply to  Peter Crisp

my thoughts exactly, us = Cylon raider, tempest more colonial blackbird

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 months ago

The rendering reminds me a bit of the THAP ( Tactical High Altitude Penetrator ) design from the 80s, but with B2 shaped saw tooth trailing edges.

Taffybadger
6 months ago

Looks like Cylon fighter from the 70’s show!

Leslie Leveson
Leslie Leveson
6 months ago

One should always remember these generations of aircraft design taken many years to fruition.We wii live in a world eventually where these craft will be robotic con trolled as the world heads into the 21st century.
One thing for certain theadvancement of air sea and land is gathering more speed now,as new threats emerge, being one step ahead.
Stabilty today instability tomorrow.

Jolly roger
Jolly roger
5 months ago

Don’t really see the point of the F35. Not really a stop gap, if it is, it’s a VERY expensive stop gap! B version is probably the most capable and practical. But we’ve paid up and are stuck with this pig. Don’t get why UK is stalling on buying more though because to fill 2 operational carriers and look credible, we will need more. Can’t fly anything else off them. We’re did we park those old but capable Sea Harriers again…….? I bet Cameron’s ‘cats and traps’ had the Navy brass drooling. Imagine that, a proper aircraft carrier that can… Read more »