Defence Secretary Ben Wallace has said that HMS Queen Elizabeth and her Carrier Strike Group show that Britain “can do both soft and hard power, and do it with quality”.

Wallace said in a statement:

“The carrier strike group has not only visited and worked with over 44 nations on its tour, but has had visits from 66 Ministers. It is great convenor and a great presence that, made in Britain, definitely does go around the world showing that Britain can do both soft and hard power, and do it with quality.”

HMS Queen Elizabeth and her Carrier Strike Group.

What is the Carrier Strike Group doing?

HMS Queen Elizabeth and her Carrier Strike Group are currently (when this was published) heading north through the Suez Canal on the return leg of their global deployment.

 

By the time the Strike Group is home, it will have travelled over 26,000 nautical miles from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea, from the Gulf of Aden to the Arabian Sea, and from the Indian Ocean to the Philippine Sea and then back again. The vessels will engage with over 40 countries.

HMS Richmond, a Type 23 Frigate assigned to HMS Queen Elizabeth’s Carrier Strike Group, was the first vessel to enter into the Mediterranean Sea on the return leg of the deployment. Besides HMS Richmond, the Strike Group comprises aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, Type 45 destroyers HMS Defender and HMS Diamond (although this ship has had recent issues), Type 23 anti-submarine frigate HMS Kent, and support ships Fort Victoria and RFA Tidespring.

In Addition, there’s an Astute class submarine and a Dutch frigate. You can read more about what the Carrier Strike Group has been up to by visiting the link below.

This deployment will end in December 2021.

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Knight7572
Knight7572
6 days ago

And people say we should stop acting like this global power and just fade into irrelevance

John Clark
John Clark
6 days ago
Reply to  Knight7572

“we should stop acting like this global power and just fade into irrelevance”

Said every defeatist, remoaning Guardian reader ever……

dave12
dave12
6 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Yes I’ve noticed a Guardian silly article claiming the new James Bond film is the UK pretending to be a superpower utter nonsense.

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  dave12

I can better that, one Guardian tit bit that made me laugh until I cried with laughter last week, was a typical “offended reader” who took offence and felt threatened, at the Union flag on a box of Supermarket Oat flakes!

Seriously, not joking, I’m sure you can look it up…

God save us from these weak shrinking violets!

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

maybe it was a box of Quaker Oats.

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

I think it was Jonathan…..

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

That it you see, if I was a Quaker I would be irritated by a national flag on me oats, but since I’m not, pass me the porridge.

Airborne
Airborne
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Brilliant!!!! 😂😂😂

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Why are Guardian readers ashamed of our flag and our country?

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Ever read the Guardian Graham, it’s an absolutely rabid anti British excuse for a paper, with every single editorial brimming with re-moaning Britain bad, EU good hatred…

It’s the great British disease of putting ourselves down unfortunately and the Guardian is head cheerleader for the cause…

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Yes but I find it goes well with a telegraph or mail. I’m a firm believer in a everything in moderation and a well balanced meal of media Trollop.

If I want a real laugh I add in an express for a wee bit of snowmageddion.

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

I think we can agree they are all just terrible, stuck in hospital a few months back and desperate enough to read the papers, just awful, piss poor politically biased journalistic pap of both political colours…

Astonished that anyone still buys and reads them to be honest.

I do enjoy my phone’s news feed, I have deliberately left the Guardian stories as they always give me a good laugh in the mornings, the offended Wokness of it’s stories are just hilarious…

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Yes unfortunately there is not a lot of quality left in the Daily media it’s all so very focused on its favoured political party view. I don’t mind opinion pieces as long as they are balanced out, but now it’s all opinions based on only one side.

I suppose they have to encourage their readership to purchase by supporting their world view…personally I like a bit of impartial facts to I can come to my own conclusion.

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Absolutely…..

Ian
Ian
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

It costs a lot of money to do proper investigative journalism. It costs very little to churn out baseless, opinionated nonsense, or uncritically regurgitate press releases. I think the rise of other media has impacted on the revenue of traditional media to the point that they simply can’t afford to produce anything worth reading any more,even if they still had the inclination.

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Ian

Probably true, especially around the new media, which I suppose has increased the demand for opinion over fact.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

BANG ON.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

The Guardian did help out in the first Lockdown of 2020 when there was a shortage of Loo Roll

Goldilocks
Goldilocks
5 days ago
Reply to  dave12

Funny, the Global Times which is a Chinese communist mouthpiece, said pretty much the same thing….

Jon
Jon
36 minutes ago
Reply to  Goldilocks

That’s because every mainstream media news channels all the mainstream papers around the world are owned by the 1% the elites(globalists)they have also bribed and blackmailed 95% of all the politicians around the world own all the corporations,banking including google Facebook Twitter who censor anyone who don’t agree with their narrative and have done for all of our known history(which is a lie)all the wars in our history are down to them they played both sides covid climate change is also a lie so they can enslave us even more it’s about time people realised we are in world war… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Oi cheeky, I read the guardian sometimes, I moan a bit as well, but I’m not defeatist, fight you over it 😀

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Bike sheds after school Jonathan, not the face though, I cherish my looks🤣🤣🤣

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Then they ,shout although with very Liberal voices “Where’s the Sercurity forces when the excrement hits the impeller . Boo whoo

George
George
6 days ago

Hi folks hope all is well.
Good to see and informs us that the UK is one of few powers with a capability to deliver a punch if required.
However, we do look foolish with all this kit and not able to protect 24 mile strip of water between France and England with scores of migrants.
Why fund France millions of pounds to protect our boarder, it’s our responsibility to protect ourselves, better to spend the money in coastal vessels and assets.
Cheers
George

OldSchool
OldSchool
6 days ago
Reply to  George

UK should outlaw accepting asylum seekers from third party countries then should just ship the new arrivals to NI and bus them to the border with Ireland. Point them south and wish them luck. ROI wanted an open border after all and we would just be facilitating transit – just like the EU funny that!

David Barry
David Barry
6 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Scotland will take them.

Andrew
Andrew
6 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Only if they are junkies and agree to be welfare dependent for the rest of their lives….

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
5 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

Hillarious. That would actually work.
Problem is. We would then be as bad as our EU “friends and allies” for not processing and dealing with these desperados who are coming to the UK to generally get a better lifestyle. Most are economic migrants rather than true refugees. If they had been true refugees they would have saught asylum in the first safe country they came too.
Problem is Italy, Spain, Greece, Austria, France are happy to wave them onto the UK and make applying for asylum impossible. They are all in breach of the UN convention on human rights.

Marked
Marked
6 days ago
Reply to  George

Problem is once we pick them up they become our problem. It would be much better for the French to pick them up on their side before they become our problem hence the support given to them.

Not that I’m cynical but it saves the French a lot of hassle if they make it to our little island or far enough out to sea our patrols intercept them. No amount of financial support will change that.

Last edited 6 days ago by Marked
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 days ago
Reply to  Marked

It is blindingly obvious the French are happy to let them come here. Not their problem then. It is our stupidity and weakness, underpinned by the HR left wing lobby, that then prevents action as we are then “racist” for being anti migrant and not accepting them. So 20,000 then becomes 100,000 then they have families themselves, our own population ages, then on and on, the population becomes 70 million, then 80 million, and we wonder why public services are falling apart no matter how much money is thrown at them. There are too many people. In the world. Full… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago

spot on D , Well done for addressing the Elephant in the room!
Why are not China, Japan, Russia, and Middle East oil rich nations compelled by the UN to take up their share of the burden?
Particularly China and Japan who bemoan their shrinking population forecasts.

James Fennell
James Fennell
6 days ago
Reply to  George

Utter and divisive claptrap. Unarmed civilians are not the remit of the armed forces – we have a Coastguard, Border Force and Police Force to manage immigration – and taken together all three have vastly more staff. It is true that migration had been weaponised by the likes of Putin, but the people themselves are not legitimate targets for military action – both an innapropriate use and wasteful of scarce and highly trained military personnel who are sorely needed elsewhere, not least to deter those who facilite illegal migration in order to disrupt the West. We should not forget that… Read more »

Last edited 6 days ago by James Fennell
Cripes
Cripes
5 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

James, your balanced view is a breath of fresh air among the anti-immigrant, anti-French, anti-Remainer, anti-Guardian UKIP stuff that precedes it!

maurice10
maurice10
5 days ago
Reply to  Cripes

At the end of the day, we are talking about human beings some may do us harm the majority just want to be safe. Not one of we site contributors would stand by and watch women and children perish in ice waters. Navy and Coastguard crews face this situation every day. We need a balanced approach to this issue and compassion comes first and foremost.

Jacko
Jacko
5 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Well you could say they were safe the moment they got into the EU! Then they risk that safety by getting into a little boat and try to cross the ditch!

Andy a
Andy a
5 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

People that are breaking U.K. law by illegal entry then disappear in black economy, no problem with legal ones.
Australia deals with situation fine but U.K. hasn’t got bottle, to many snowflakes claiming would break international law! Funny Oz has done fine for 30+ years

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 days ago
Reply to  Cripes

That does not answer the situation that there are 20,000 people illegally entering a supposedly modern 21st century nation that seems powerless to stop it. How soon would people call the police if someone illegally entered their home? And this country IS our home. And yep, I’m proudly all of those, bar anti French and anti remainer. Leavers are only seen as “anti remainer” due to the claptrap that some of them are still spouting about Brexit. Did anyone else notice RD Shell are moving their HQ to the UK and that the City is still booming? That sort of… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Well said. We are all the decedents of immigrants, the soul, geography and culture of this nation was developed and sculpted from immigration. first Palaeolithic tribes crossing the land bridge clearing land and creating a varied landscape from never ending forest and leaving their monuments and archeology to be dug up, later the p and q celts came creating a vibrant and rich culture that attracted the Roman Empire and creation of Romano-Celtic culture, the movement of Germanic peoples after the fall of the western Roman Empire and creation of Anglo Saxon culture, the movement of Danes and creation of… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Immigration isn’t the issue as like you have stated we have had immigration since at least recorded history. However it’s not immigration in itself, it’s the numbers in a compressed timeframe. Obviously population levels were a lot less but for example between the 5-7th CE when the Angles, Saxons, Jutes came over, the numbers were in the small 10s of thousands over a period of a generation, with the land available to be farmed and shared out (but the actual Romanised and ancient Britain’s didn’t quite agree but that’s another story lol) whereby the numbers we are seeing in the… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

I do know what you mean, I just get a bit pissy when I think people try to simply what is a really complex problem. For me the big problem is it’s just going to get worse and worse the way we are going. The mass migration of peoples have always been sparked by something, the Romans came for wealth and mineral resources, the Saxons filled a power vacuum, the Danes came for land and food security etc. What we are facing now is just the beginning of a likely period of great migrations driven by a massive wealth disparity,… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

We are thinking pretty much along the same lines Jon, immigration will never stop, it just needs to be both sensible and humane! However your correct insofar that the issue is being weaponised by certain countries and their leaders.

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Nicely put AB -on fire today Mate!

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Thanks mate

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

I think Airborne’s comments express my view very well. It is important to note other legitimate refuges will have their place in the ques kicked into touch by theses huge numbers of refugees. It is unfeasible and unrealistic to expect any particular country to absorb numbers like this into their society. Who will pay ? My view is is high time that other non western nations start to shoulder the burden. China, Japan, Saud Arabia ,need to step up and take up a realistic quota of theses souls. They bemoan their shrinking population forecasts whilst remaining ardent racists by not… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Hi Jonathan-apologies for the sudden change in font colour- unsure what I did there.

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

I liked the Blue Klonkie, 😆 I do agree it’s got to be more of an international strategy, one very already well populated island can’t actual do very much around large scale movement of peoples There are lots of nations that do need to take a lot more people.

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Cheers Jonathan!.

Klonkie
Klonkie
5 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

So what is your proposal James? Ho would you manage this?

James Fennell
James Fennell
4 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Klonkie I am go to answer this in a roundabout way, so bear with me. Firstly we are already at war: if you want to know about the Grey Zone, just read that post from ‘George’. Putin has made it clear that he wants to ‘shatter Europe’ – what he means is break it up as a force to be reckoned with so he can have a free hand in the former Soviet sphere of influence. He has cottoned onto a range of issues that divide the West – immigration being one of them. He would much rather the UK… Read more »

Last edited 4 days ago by James Fennell
Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Top post James.

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

hhm, most of it, but not all.

Jonathan
Jonathan
4 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Nice post James, thankyou for taking the time, I have to say I do think migration has become more of a geopolitical tool again ( it was before and is again).

grizzler
grizzler
4 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Theres quite a bit of liberalism and unassociated detail in that post – I may agree with some of the sentiment but not all & in essence If I disect your answer I’m not sure you provided much by the way of detail.
I think you are somewhat obfuscating ,or even missing, the point:
There is a an illegal trade facilitating immigration by subversive mechanisms directly impacting the UK borders – and that needs to be addressed and stopped.

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

My thoughts too- please see my response to James

James Fennell
James Fennell
4 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

I am not an ideologue – I take the ideas that I think are right from whatever canon – I have been around the globe many times and know much about and have respect for other societies. Yet I am a proud Briton, and that means I take seriously and wish to uphold our historical values, our moderate and humane society and our ethical insitutions. You can call that liberalism if you like. I call it old fashioned British decency.

Last edited 4 days ago by James Fennell
James Fennell
James Fennell
4 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

My point is that is people trafficking is not just a ‘trade’ it is also politcised by our adversaries. That you will only deal woith this problem by dealing with those who wish to disrupt our society. However troublesome Macron might be, he is nothing to Putin and Xi – Marcon is pissed with us, and France’s baby is the EU, but Putin and Xi want to smash us back to the stoneage. I’m not sure anyone gets how deeply under threat western society is – economically, politcally and ethically as well as militarily.

Last edited 4 days ago by James Fennell
Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

HI James. Thank you for going to the trouble of drafting such a detailed and thorough reply. Much of your commentary find me in agreements. However the current situation appears untenable. How can one country absorb such volumes of migrants at one point in time? I suspect many of theses folk are not refugees but opportunists seeking a better way of life. I don’t begrudge them for improving their lot, bet thy need to do it through the legitimate framework and process. Why should thy jump ahead of the que ahead of those who have lodged legit applications? My principal… Read more »

James Fennell
James Fennell
4 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Hi Klonkie, Did I say we need to accept more migrants? I don’t think I did. Because I said we should treat any migrants to the UK decently, and look to those who wish to weaponize migration to Europe for causes, you assumed that I support increased immigration, right? I do not – I think are limits and we need to control immigration. But I don’t think blaming the migrants or France will help with that. This is the problem with the current debate – it it not possible to speak of humane values without being branded ‘woke’. I am… Read more »

Last edited 4 days ago by James Fennell
grizzler
grizzler
3 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Thanks for the reply -It gives more detail and a more rounded impression of where you are coming- and for whats its worth I agree with much of that.I dont see them all as the enemy ,although there will of course , be those amongst them that seek to do us ill as there will be in legal migrants and home grown ones!. Indeed I felel sorry for those let down -for example in Afghanistan- in wars we have been involved in. Leaving that aside for the momemt Nor do I feel we should stop all immigration – just a… Read more »

James Fennell
James Fennell
3 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

Yes I agree with those points – and also agree with the impact in Sweden (my wife is Swedish and her family has strong views on silly government policy). I don’t think we will get cooperation from Russia, Belarus, China nor Turkey, but we need to nail the traffickers for sure.

Klonkie
Klonkie
3 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Hi James. My apologies if my comments inferred you were pro to opening up the migration floodgates. I don’t think your view on compassion to those less fortunate is by any means “left wing” I too am an immigrant (to NZ), so as I said I don’t begrudge people looking to better their lot, but it needs to be within a legitimate framework. I’d like to think the UK government would not to quote you” round up people because they are different and throw them in camps.” I believe it is far preferable to prevent illegal migration from entering the… Read more »

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
5 days ago
Reply to  George

France is in breach of international law by allowing the boats to even launch. Also in breach for not processing these illegal economic migrants as if they were true refugees they would claim sanctity in the first “safe country” they entered. The fact they have all travelled through entirely of Europe proves they are not refugees. All should be given humanitarian assistance then as long as not minors (eg under 18 years old) should be loaded onto commercial flights with an air marshal or law enforcement office present and sent back to the country they came from. Namely France. France… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Can’t disagree on what France ( government not people) is doing, a half arse job at best, morally reprehensible at worst, because they want the people to move on and seem to be willing to allow something that involves risking lives.

Andy a
Andy a
5 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

What makes u think france is breaking law? Before u start there is no international law which says they must claim asylum in first country visited

grizzler
grizzler
4 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

It may not be part of the 1951 UN Refugee Convention, but there is both UK law and EU law that has the potential to address the issue. There also sufficient ambiguity therin as to whether your statement is actually correct.
Whether or not that will hold any sway with France is quite another matter of course:

https://fullfact.org/immigration/refugees-first-safe-country/

Andy a
Andy a
4 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

Your own link says in their opinion there isn’t international law to back this up, we are also not in the EU. This is from law journal “The Home Secretary has said that a genuine refugee would claim asylum in the first safe country he or she reaches. He therefore deduces, or at least claims to deduce, that those traveling from France to the UK are not genuine refugees.” “This sounds good and appeals to a certain constituency. It is also what some in the UK would like the law to be. But we have seen that human nature does… Read more »

grizzler
grizzler
3 days ago
Reply to  Andy a

I know we are not in the EU but France Belguim etc are – hence me stating the implications reagrds UK & EU law. There is a return treaty if we want to use it- we dont..in the same way Cameron didnt want to invoke a cap for fear of upsetting Merkel…that turned out well for him in his referendum didnt it.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
5 days ago
Reply to  George

George, the Navy don’t do migrant control duties – that is for Border Force, HM Coastguard and the Police.

grizzler
grizzler
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

The Police- Christ they can’t even handle the criminality already endemic in the UK- what are they supposed to do.
There have been many on here who have in the past suggested the Navy get involved.
I also take issue with RNLI being used tbh-whitlst they are being cajouled into getting involved with the illegal people traffiking their real purpose is being undermined. I await the outcry following the drowning of some guy fishing off the coast whilst the nearest lifeboat is out acting as an immigrant ferry, a most definate missappropriation of a valuable resource.

Jon
Jon
31 minutes ago
Reply to  George

That’s because the politicians are doing as they are told if you think they run the country or ever have you are sadly mistaken

Paul42
Paul42
6 days ago

I think a few things need to be recognised and accepted before we try and pump ourselves up at it were….. Firstly, our F35Bs have the absolute minimum weapons fit at present and do not have any kind of Anti-Ship or Land Attack missiles. Our carriers whilst impressive in a lot of ways, have absolute minimum defensive fit and rely too much in escorts to stay alive in a high threat area Our escorts whilst fitted for AAW, are unable to demonstrate any significant anti-ship capability or land attack capability…..so, in short, it looks good, sounds good, but sadly truly… Read more »

Marked
Marked
6 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

Yeah, like all our forces its the same story. We punch above our weight. As long as the enemy cooperates and doesn’t throw out any threats our forces are fitted for but not with countermeasures for…

John Clark
John Clark
6 days ago
Reply to  Marked

glass half full guys, it’s more than good enough to act as the big stick of foreign diplomacy, as it stands and take on many potentially hostile counties around the world.

Future improvements will see the gaps being filled.

The capability is already better than anything anyone else can field, bar the super powers to be honest.

Marked
Marked
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

The worry is our wonderful political dictators will feel the need to show our support to our bigger friends if the balloon goes up. If they don’t they’ll be left shown up and lose any credibility to the world audience. Bye bye global Britain boasts. That will leave our forces far from home ill equipped for the mess they find themselves in. It could end up a slaughter. Either we stick to using our forces at the level they are equipped for or we equip them to match the posturing they are doing. What is being done right now is… Read more »

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  Marked

I’m not sure Marked, I think the right posture is slightly more shades of grey than Black and white. Our carrier capability will be used over the next 40 odd years against all sorts of rouge states on operations like Libya, the Balkans etc. Any conflict in the SCS will likely spark off quickly and go from 0 to 100mph in the blink of an eye. An accidental shot will be retaliated for (probably Taiwan, but perhaps the Spratly’s) and it will turn into all out war very quickly. I would expect a brief, but very bloody conflict involving the… Read more »

Paul42
Paul42
5 days ago
Reply to  Marked

A paper tiger…..

John Clark
John Clark
6 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

To be fair Paul, any Ding Dong in the SCS will be a two way effort in the land of the Giants, with the US and China slogging it out, South Korea and Japan pitching in.

The UK will always be a bit part player there, perhaps causing a little mayhem with SF and the odd astute SSN.

Paul42
Paul42
6 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Problem is our allies will expect us to get in there with our new big carriers and 5th gen Stealth aircraft. We’ll end up relying on US Easorts for all round protection…..

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
5 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

And the RN has provided T45 capability to the American carrier’s. Because they bring capabilities US escorts can’t.

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

Australia have just said they would stand up if Taiwan invaded. The Chinese replied they would Australia if they did.

All becoming very bellicose; of course, if a US ship gets in the way, can we see an Article 5 being called?

Paul42
Paul42
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Things are warming up a bit with China determined to test the west to the limit….in what is effectively becoming a game of chicken…if it starts, where will it stop? I think China heavily underestimates the US, thinking by flashing all these new weapons that it is in some way indicating military superiority…..but it fails to stop and think about US Black projects that the world knows little or nothing about….what was it flying over Amerillo all those years ago? It wasn’t B2s…..

Gr
Gr
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Article 5 can only be invoked as per Article 6 if a member state’s forces or territory are attacked north of the Tropic of Cancer, which is why it couldn’t be invoked over the invasion of the Falklands.

Taiwan is right on the line though, so it could be invoked if a US ship in the northern part of the Taiwan strait was attacked.

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  Gr

Have an informative.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
5 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

All carriers of any nation are heavily reliant on escorts. Nothing moves within 500 miles of the carrier without them knowing about it. And we do have land attack capability. Astute class with TLAM capability. Carrier strike is an evolving capability, with much more to come. It takes time. And even today is only beaten by the American carrier’s in strike capability.

Paul42
Paul42
5 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Our TLAM capability is very limited. Whilst the US might launch 30 at a time, we might be lucky if we manage 3 due to very limited missile stocks. We need to do much better, but funds are are limited…..

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
5 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

Hi Paul, i totally agree with all on your “shipping list”! But to give some credit it’s a pretty darn good show for the UK and its allies to pull off this CSG round trip…even if they did leave out a visit to Sydney!

DanielMorgan
DanielMorgan
6 days ago

This whole thing smacks of Norma Desmond in Sunset Boulevard.

Cripes
Cripes
5 days ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

??? – Don’t know this one Daniel, could you elucidate?

simon alexander
simon alexander
5 days ago

the achievement speaks more than the words. we have carrier capability and friendly countries willing to sail alongside.

Cripes
Cripes
5 days ago

I don’t know about punching above our weight but we sure talk above it. One Harrier carrier with a small number of rather short-range aircraft is not that big a deal outside the UK, certainly not compared to USN carrier air groups or emerging Chinese carrier capability. The carrier certainly has a useful role to play in any limited out-of-area conflict. But its role in NATO is also marginal, given that it would be foolish for it to enter the Baltic or Black Sea if there was any risk of a shooting war. The fact that the B barely has… Read more »

Knight7572
Knight7572
5 days ago
Reply to  Cripes

Umm the Panavia Tornado is 40+ years old and is frankly becoming obsolete

Germany is already planning to retire them in favour of the Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornets and Eurofighter Typhoons and the Panavia Tornado ECR with Boeing EA-18G Growlers

Italy is replacing their Panavia Tornadoes with F-35A Lightning IIs

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
5 days ago
Reply to  Cripes

Cripes, I am a bit confused by nearly everything in your post: We haven’t had Harrier carriers for over 10 years. We don’t have one carrier, we have two. Pointless to compare our carrier capability to that of the USN – they are a superpower and we are not. Why would non-Brits not be impressed by the world’s second best carrier capability outside the USA? We did not envisage carriers playing a role in eastern European waters during the Cold War, so why now? Are our two carriers really now meant to take on the Russians, if the balloon goes… Read more »

grizzler
grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

In any substansial conflict I cant see the RN allowing a couple of dozen Bs to be transfered off the carriers so one or two carriers if the range of the aircraft is the same and if they cant get to where they are needed and perform any real role for any length of time then they become aomewhat surplus. Regards the possibilty of A’s to the RAF theres plenty on here that don’t see why the RAF should get any A variants at all- they would prefer to wait for Tempest…so lets hope Russia and China afford us that… Read more »

Last edited 5 days ago by grizzler
Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Cripes

The Combat range difference between a F35A and F35B is a bit marginal ( 155 miles ish) and is totally overshadowed by the fact a carrier based F35B can be transported and launched from almost any part of the worlds oceans and the F35A is chained to 10,000 feet of friendly runway.

Esteban
Esteban
5 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

UK needs to actually buy some weapons for their B’s. It is a emperor has no clothes situation at the moment.

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Esteban

Agreeded it’s a bit of a blunt instrument at present although Paveway is a very effective weapon system.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
5 days ago
Reply to  Esteban

Enhanced Paveway 4 is an extremely accurate and flexible weapon. Laser guided and GPS guided. It’s a true all weather day/night precision weapon. Can hit moving targets too. Can be re-targeted in-flight. And 6 weapons can hit 6 different targets in a single pass. Very advanced fusing options, and angle of penetration. A bunker busting version is entering service soon. It’s a very capable weapon.

Jonathan
Jonathan
5 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Hi Robert although it’s only one of the tools the F35 will have and therefore has limits until it gets the rest of the tools in a few years. although a very clever/accurate guided 500kg bomb has a broad use from moving targets to hardened bunkers, it becomes more difficult in the situations where less is more ( spear 3) which means at present the F35 is a well armed hammer, awaiting some finesse tools. What interests me is how effective a fifth generation fighter armed with Paveway would be against surface warships ? I imagine it would be devastating… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
4 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

EPW4 can dail down it’s warhead, and has been used to take out individual snipers ect. Dailed up, due to it’s clever fuse options, it can provide about 80% of the same bang as a 1000lb weapon. Use against vessels would be pretty effective, if the aircraft can get close enough and get through the warships defences, so it’s big if. Any anti ship warfare is very difficult to pull off. Finding, tracking and engaging is a tricky business, even for the most capable weapon systems and platforms. Submarines are the most effective anti ship capability. Presence alone will keep… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
4 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Hi Robert, cheers, I did not realise that the Fusing on Paveway 4 was that flexible around reducing the area effects of the weapon. Even more flexible than I thought.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
4 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

It’s a cracking bit of kit. And has pretty much replaced the 1000lb & 2000lb paveways. Spear 3 and spear EW will bring another superb capability. F35 will be able to carry 8 Spear 3’s internally. 👍

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
4 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

It can also be re-targeted in flight, or steered away to a safe area if civilians are spotted in the target area.

James Fennell
James Fennell
5 days ago
Reply to  Esteban

No F-35Bs have been cleared for more weapons than the UK’s. Its to do with the software updates. UK F-35B’s can carry the same weapons as USMC F-35s, plus ASRAAM and Paveway IV. Also we forget that the F-35 is designed to penetrate enemy A2AD bubbles with stealth and powerful ISTAR, electronic attack and countermeasures capabilities – it does not need to rely on stand-off weapons. They can defeat hostile air defences to enable gen 4 aircraft or long range missiles to deliver the goods. In a maritime environment, Spear 3 is good ensough to degrade a naval task force’s… Read more »

Last edited 5 days ago by James Fennell
Esteban
Esteban
4 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Spear 3 will not reach FOC until 2028. No heavyweight SSM until at least 2030. Flying around within visual range of any sort near peer adversary seems like a really poor idea. The AC is low observable not invisible.

James Fennell
James Fennell
4 days ago
Reply to  Esteban

F-35B is not cleared for any ASM – so integration will take longer than for Spear 3, and as long as FCASW.

Last edited 4 days ago by James Fennell
Daddy Mack
Daddy Mack
5 days ago

I’m sure when it all kicks off the two Carriers, dozens of Escorts and 24 F35B’s will be instrumental in the defence of The Royal Family and the Right Honourable Cabinet ministers, ensuring their liberty and their personal evacuations to the land of self preservation.