An Indonesian submarine has gone missing with 53 crew members.

The Indonesian government reported the disappearance of submarine KRI Nanggala during a torpedo live fire exercise earlier today, requesting search and rescue assistance from Singapore and Australia.

An Indonesian Navy spokesperson First Admiral Julius Widjojono announced that Nanggala had failed to report for a post-maneuver brief following a torpedo live fire exercise in the Bali Sea off the coast of Surabaya, about 50 nautical miles north of Bali, an area where the water is reportedly around 700 metres deep.

In the press conference, the Indonesian government announced a search party of warships and specialised divers was being deployed, and revealed they had requested the assistance of the governments of Singapore and Australia to aid in the search. Soon after, the Republic of Singapore Navy submarine support and rescue vessel MV Swift Rescue was reported to have deployed to the Bali Sea.

The KRI Nanggala

The submarine is Cakra classvessel, a class of two Type 209/1300 attack submarines that were bought from Germany and commissioned by the Indonesian Navy in the 1980s. Nanggala is capable of firing four torpedoes simultaneously at four different targets and launching anti-ship missiles such as Exocet or Harpoon. The subs safe diving depth was increased to 257 metres and her top speed was increased from 21 knots to 25 knots as part of her last refit.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
35 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Paul
Paul
2 months ago

Presumably the NATO Submarine Rescue System will have already been in touch…?

Never good to read a story like this, thoughts are with the sailors and their families.

DRS
DRS
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul

Hope they find them safe and sound and quickly.

I wonder if for rescues you could attach some flexible balloons to the sub with an remote vehicle to help float them up?

AJH
AJH
2 months ago

Type 209 German submarine, similar to the Argentinian San Juan that went down. Wonder if there’s any sort of design flaw? Hope the crew are found alive and well

Mike O
Mike O
2 months ago
Reply to  AJH

I think in both cases the submarines were quite old. That is possibly one of the main factors. Good luck to the rescue teams. I hope any survivors are found quickly.

Lordtemplar
Lordtemplar
2 months ago
Reply to  Mike O

The sub was from the 80s, but it had been overhauled in 2010 by Daewoo in South Korea, including upgrade to propulsion and combat systems.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago
Reply to  AJH

It’s just age isnt it? A sub from the 1980s is 40 years old. Has she had all her sea valves and seals checked and replaced?

Spencer
Spencer
2 months ago
Reply to  AJH

Iirc, the San Juan was old and heavily modified (been stretched out at some point with an additional section), the modification being thought to be the point of failure, but I could be misremembering.

Andy P
Andy P
2 months ago

Hopefully there’s a range vessel or similar to narrow the search area down. Fingers crossed for all onboard.

Deep32
Deep32
2 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Water depth is 3x SDD, 40yo hull, I think we need to keep everything crossed and hope MV Swift Rescue gets on scene sooner rather than later.

Andy P
Andy P
2 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

No idea what DDD/crush depth is on these but if its a hull (and backup) valve that’s gone there might still be hope. Can’t speak for the German ‘steaming bats’ but the pressure hulls on ours have given me a lot of confidence in the past. It is the nightmare though.

Deep32
Deep32
2 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Yes, agree that the hull is strong, if any potential flooding can be localised and thus contained, might still be okay.
Then it all depends on the angle shes ay for any rescue attempt. Its still sh*t as you say.

George Royce
George Royce
2 months ago

Prayers for every seamen on the boat.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago

Sad news, it certainly doesn’t look good for all onboard at these depths.

farouk
farouk
2 months ago

A little more info from the Aussi Media: Indonesia asks Australia to help search for submarine with 53 on board Singapore: Indonesia’s military chief says the country has asked the Australian Defence Force to try and help locate a submarine that is missing north of Bali with 53 sailors on board. Contact was lost with the German-built submarine in the early hours of Wednesday morning after it undertook a torpedo training exercise about 100km north of Bali.An oil spill was discovered during aerial surveillance of the area several hours after the vessel disappeared. Air Chief Marshal Hadi Tjahjanto, the commander of… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by farouk
farouk
farouk
2 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Further to my last a little info on Singapore’s submarine rescue vessel, MV Swift Rescue MV Swift Rescue Submarine Support and Rescue Vessel (SSRV)MV Swift Rescue is a Submarine Support and Rescue Vessel (SSRV) that is operated by the Singapore Navy. It was built by ST Marine, a subsidiary of Singapore Technologies Engineering (ST Engineering). The vessel is capable of conducting rescue operations in Sea State 5 conditions. Swift Rescue was launched by the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) in November 2008. The vessel is equipped with Submarine Escape and Rescue (SMER) capabilities. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) awarded… Read more »

Chris
Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  farouk

I previously worked for James Fisher Defence (now just JFD) for a good few years. Extremely capable subsea operations company. They also operate the Australian SRS and the NATO SRS out of Faslane. If anyone can do it, they can. But if it’s descended to 700m then it’s unlikely I’d say.

God speed to all involved, praying for everyone.

Last edited 2 months ago by Chris
Chris
Chris
2 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Thanks for the updates Farouk.

Rob
Rob
2 months ago

When the words torpedo practise are followed by the words submarine missing it is never good; flooding, explosion and or both are on the cards – I do hope not. God speed to the crew.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
2 months ago

I really hope the crew are OK. Particularly after the very sad Argentinian loss previously. It does make you realise why the UK retires its submarines after a well defined period. I would imagine that with a much smaller hull and therefore less compartments any major leaks would be much harder to control at depth even when fully closed up. I am assuming that the torpedo room would have to be minimum 2x length of a munition plus handling margin so proportionately quite long for a small sub – tube + mention + inner hatch opening + margin so the… Read more »

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago

Oh dear. This looks grim.
Max diving depth 251m and yet water depth 700m. If she has gone to the bottom she will have crumbled.
Hopefully she hasn’t gone down.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago

I know its top secret but I wonder if an astute can even operate at this depth. 700m is pretty deep water.

Chris
Chris
2 months ago

Sad news, my thoughts are with all onboard and their families.

David
David
2 months ago

Their God in their Heaven, give them life. Thoughts.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
2 months ago

Time to rally round. But the prospects look bleak.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago

Bloody dangerous job, every time you set foot in one, peacetime or war. It’s not like driving to SPTA to shoot some rounds down, every time you dive you are in a dangerous, alien environment and every dive is real. Respect and hope these blokes are recovered. Bit far for our submarine rescue people to be involved but I wouldnt be surprise if they are on standby, or even in the air as we speak. Any of you guys who are crazy enough to have been a submariner, update or advise either way, Deep32? Cheers.

Deep32
Deep32
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Morning mate, like everyone else, keeping my fingers crossed for them. Good news is there is a safety ship/Torpedo Recovery Vessel on site, as its a torpedo firing a exclusion area will be declared, so, they should know roughly where she is. Recovery vessel from Singapore and Aussie SSPAG enroute, again good news. Unfortunately at that depth they are not getting out by themselves, so will need a rescue submersible to lift them off. The fact that they didnt manage to get upto the surface under there own power doesnt bode well, some sort of major flooding has obviously occurred.… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

Cheers mate, fingers crossed for these lads.

Deep32
Deep32
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

No worries, however, have to say Im not overly optemistic for their chances, its deep water.

OldSchool
OldSchool
2 months ago

Sad news. God bless all the crew wherever they may be.

Last in Indonesia in 2019 – despite the bad wrap it sometimes gets Indonesians in general are very welcoming to westerners.

Captain P Wash
Captain P Wash
2 months ago

Sadly, there is still no news.

Andrew D
2 months ago

Not seen anything on TV news about this SUB ,but God bless them.

Deep32
Deep32
2 months ago

Indonesian Navy have now confirmed that the SM has sunk in 850m of water, with the loss of the crew. A very sad state for all their families. RIP fellas.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
2 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

A tragic loss of life.

RIP on Eternal Patrol

Andy P
Andy P
2 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

Just posted and now seen your post mate. The boat was found in 3 pieces, be curious to see the outcome of the enquiry.

Feel for them, at least they got to ‘don the white woolly pully’.

Andy P
Andy P
2 months ago

I see its been confirmed that the boat has been found in 3 pieces, poor buggers.