HMS Enterprise has arrived in the Irish city of Cork for a routine port call not long after an Irish vessel visited the British city of Glasgow.

According to local reports, HMS Enterprise is currently tied up in the heart of Cork city, on Horgan’s Quay, where she flies both the Union Jack and the Irish Tricolour (as ships visiting foreign ports do out of courtesy to their hosts).

“The good news is that even as Ireland, the EU and the UK stand on the brink of a possible ‘trade war’ over the Northern Ireland protocol, the Royal Navy has nothing but friendly intentions in the harbour that once was home to the fleets that guarded the Western Approaches of the Empire.

HMS Enterprise is an Echo-class multi-role survey, hydrographic and oceanographic vessel (SVHO) of the Royal Navy and along with surveying and mapping the ocean depths, she has been involved in many humanitarian and emergency missions in recent years, including rescuing more than 2,400 migrants and refugees attempting to cross from war-torn Libya to Italy during the crisis in the north-African country in 2015.”

Irish Naval Vessel LÉ George Bernard Shaw visited Glasgow in April, the visit by the Offshore Patrol Vessel is the first Irish Naval visit to Scotland for over 10 years.

Irish naval vessel visits City of Glasgow

LÉ George Bernard Shaw is a Samuel Beckett-class offshore patrol vessel of the Irish Naval Service. It is the fourth ship in a series of vessels designed by Vard Marine and built by Babcock Marine Appledore, and is named for the writer George Bernard Shaw.

According to the Irish Naval Service:

“LÉ George Bernard Shaw (pennant number P64) is the fourth and final ship of the P60 class vessels built for the Naval Service in Babcock Marine Appledore, Devon. In keeping with the ethos of a continuous learning organisation, she contains a number of minor improvements over her sister ships, aimed primarily at improving energy efficiency whilst still maintaining effectiveness. She is designed as on Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV), with the endurance and capability to defend Ireland’s interests at, and from, any sea in the world.”

The ship was accepted into service in October 2018, and, following a military fit-out, has commenced Maritime Defence and Security Operations at sea. Additionally, the ship recently conducted night operations & fishery protection duties.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Barry Larking
Barry Larking
9 days ago

‘named after …’ Only Ireland would name a naval ship after a writer.

I suppose H,M.S. Kipling is out of the question?

Mark
Mark
9 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

It was one of the pet issues of the Minister for Defence when the ships were being ordered, he hated the norm of female figures that had been used since the founding of the service. The NS at that stage were so desperate to get the order through and start the builds they didn’t care what they were named.

Last edited 9 days ago by Mark
geoff
geoff
8 days ago
Reply to  Mark

Good Morning Mark. I hope you are well.
It was either Echo or Enterprise that visited Durban about 15 years ago. We approached too close on a double kayak to get a better look and were chased off by the gun toting crew of our harbour patrol! The Samuel Beckets are good looking ships-nice to see the RN and Irish Naval service working together. My daughter is moving to Cork to boost the Prod population down south😂
All the best
Geoff

Mark
Mark
8 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Nice to hear from you Geoff, for us it’s mainly the USN a that has that level of security when they are doing harbour visits, drives everyone nuts, for the RN it’s normally just one bored cop. Hope you daughter enjoys the Rebel county.

Richard Graham
Richard Graham
9 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

I kinda like the naming used by the Republic of Singapore Navy… 😉

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ships_of_the_Republic_of_Singapore_Navy

william james crawford
william james crawford
8 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

HMS Kipling, completed Yarrow Jan ’39, sunk in Med May ’42

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
8 days ago

Thank you William, I had no idea. Brave men remembered to God in my prayers.

Simon
Simon
9 days ago

A warship may have to go and do some damage one day, the name cannot be too saintly.

Farouk
Farouk
9 days ago

I did 3 years in the province, loved it. Used to visit HMS Caroline (it was a HQ for some unit) , never bother my backside to look up its history. wish I had, its now been renovated and brought back to its glory days. Next time I am across the water, I intend to visit.

Andrew Munro
Andrew Munro
9 days ago

At least it has a gun not like our Rivers with their pop guns.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Munro

But nothing else, it isn’t built to warship standards! Take time to research the rivers build specs. The rivers are built to warship standards, the Irish ships aren’t. Capability is more than a “bigger gun”. Cheers.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
8 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Munro

The Naval Service OPV’s are smart looking ships with the 76mm gun. But they’re built to a commercial standard. Damage control, fire fighting, watertight integrity, magazine armour etc are way inferior to the Rivers and cannot really be considered warships in the sense that their ability to sustain battle damage is severely limited. An unprotected magazine of 76mm ammunition being struck by an enemy projectile would most likely result in the catastrophic loss of the ship.

Wasp snorter
Wasp snorter
7 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Munro

Yeah but it’s bling and not basics, whereas the Rivers are all basics and no bling. Rivers are built to warship standard. In a war you want the latter as it can easily be upgunned if required. The Irish ships have a pointless gun as it would never be sent in harms way, it only needed a 30mm not 76mm.

Mark
Mark
7 days ago
Reply to  Wasp snorter

The decision for the 76mm standardisation was made in the 80s after the failure of the 57mm on Eithne and the purchase of the Peacocks, after that all the new builds were bought with them. As to the design of the P50/60s, that’s a whole other matter with plenty of different actors having a say.

Andrew Munro
Andrew Munro
8 days ago

Don’t they also have peacocks must have been built to naval standards also with 76mm gun survey we should have kept them after handover??

Mark
Mark
8 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Munro

The Irish Peacocks were sold on long before handover, back in ‘88, suppose you could have held onto the ones Philippine’s ones but for what? Though if you like the RN could buy the Irish ones now, they are heading to the breakers.

Andrew Munro
Andrew Munro
8 days ago
Reply to  Mark

I liked the peacocks, a modern flower.

Mark
Mark
8 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Munro

Not really suited for modern crewing, and relatively short legged.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
8 days ago
Reply to  Mark

Wonder if the Irish navy would be up for 1-2 T31s? Not sure if they have got over their manning issues?

Mark
Mark
8 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Sometimes I wonder if posters have any idea of the size of the NS, even if they were at full establishment that would only be 1000 or so people, sustaining one or two frigates is well beyond that capacity. Hell even if the current plan is approved and it’s grown to 2k with the crewing plan for the OPVs that leaves little spare capacity. The Peacocks are being replaced with the two surplus Lake Class boats from New Zealand and will be based out of Dublin, after that and the MRV things are up in the air but I’d say… Read more »

Andrew Peter Smith
Andrew Peter Smith
8 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

They dont need them

Mark
Mark
8 days ago

Depends on what the Government might take from the. Commissions report, what replaces the P50s end of the decade is ill defined right now.

Andrew Peter Smith
Andrew Peter Smith
8 days ago

Both of those ships were built at Appledore Shipbuilders

criss whicker
criss whicker
7 days ago

is it just me, or does our ship look positively old and rusty, compared to that new shiny ship they have.

just an opinion.

Mark
Mark
7 days ago
Reply to  criss whicker

JJ is the youngest ship in the fleet with a hell of a lot less sea miles than Enterprise, the P50s looked worse before they went in for their midlife’s.

Denis May
Denis May
7 days ago

What do the Irish Naval Service think of their “Sea Camouflage” Uniform?
I hope it is not a route the British take.

Mark
Mark
7 days ago
Reply to  Denis May

It’s better than what they had… That’s about it from what I’ve heard.

Denis May
Denis May
2 hours ago
Reply to  Mark

Sounds like damning with faint praise.